Landracing Forum Home
December 18, 2017, 05:57:54 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
BACK TO LANDRACING.COM HOMEPAGE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  


(Note: Donations are not tax deductible)







Live Audio Streaming and Archives of Past Events
Next Live Event: TBD
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Indy or straight?  (Read 12297 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
RICK
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Elsberry.MO
Posts: 202





Ignore
« on: February 03, 2006, 01:57:36 PM »

I was just going thru some pics in "BUILD DIARYS" and I saw a Vega with a front tube axle? Is that the prefered suspension or would a independent front be better?
 And I think it had a PACCARD? motor? Why?
Logged

It's not over, it's just harder.

"Herion addiction, is cheaper, and safer." *Will Fields
landracing
Guest

« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2006, 04:36:45 PM »

That pictures was Rich Fox's car. You ask why a Paccard.. Because he had one sitting around probably would be the answer...

Jon
Logged
JackD
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 71
Location: The great race track in the heavens above
Posts: 4684




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2006, 07:16:47 PM »

It is the same "Burning Desire" that caused the first person to Climb Signal Hill. wink
Logged

"I would rather lose going fast enough to win than win going slow enough to lose."
"That horrible smell is dirty feet being held to the fire"
RICK
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Elsberry.MO
Posts: 202





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2006, 07:57:12 PM »

Packard motor/top loader in a Vega racing car? In my heart, in the pit of my stomach, I know why. I just can't explain it to anybody I know. Don't get me wrong,,, I think the consept is way way cool. Almost better than sex. I just don't have the nuts to try it.
 
  Which brings us back to the original question, ,,Which works the best, independent or straight  axle and why?


        eye think my spell check, she is no workin
Logged

It's not over, it's just harder.

"Herion addiction, is cheaper, and safer." *Will Fields
JackD
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 71
Location: The great race track in the heavens above
Posts: 4684




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2006, 02:53:19 AM »

If you are building from scratch the straight axle offers less monkey motion unless you have to take it under the motor.
The various speeds and conditions seen by an LSR vehicle don't require near the suspension science that other series need but it does have to be strong.
A drag race set up on the front of a car that would run forever on the strip failed on the salt and put the driver on his head.
Logged

"I would rather lose going fast enough to win than win going slow enough to lose."
"That horrible smell is dirty feet being held to the fire"
dwarner
Guest

« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2006, 12:28:01 PM »

Bill Ward's Opel has the axle welded to the frame as does many a Lakester and Streamliner. Works just fine for what we do.

DW
Logged
JackD
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 71
Location: The great race track in the heavens above
Posts: 4684




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2006, 12:43:58 PM »

Quote from: dwarner
Bill Ward's Opel has the axle welded to the frame as does many a Lester and Stream liner. Works just fine for what we do.

DW

Bill has a BBC in an Opel GT that runs 250 if you need test results. wink
Logged

"I would rather lose going fast enough to win than win going slow enough to lose."
"That horrible smell is dirty feet being held to the fire"
RichFox
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: San Mateo, Ca
Posts: 2439





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2006, 01:54:47 PM »

When I built the car a tube axle with early Ford type suspension was what I was used to and easiest to construct. I have run the car with different GMC 6 cylinder engines, a 460 Ford, 455 Pontiac, and a 392 Chrysler. When I was a kid I thought Packards were neat. I have never seen a Packard powered Vega. I have some Packard motors. What's the big deal. At least it's not a '32 Plymouth with a '57 Ford head. The car has a best run of 208 mph and many runs in the 180-208 range. Always straight and easy to drive.
Logged
Sumner
Global Moderator
Hero Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 73
Location: Blanding, Utah
Posts: 3968


Blanding, Ut..a small dot in the middle of nowhere


WWW
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2006, 02:45:17 PM »

Just to present a different perspective, last year and some other years provided some real difficulties for cars with no suspension.  They will come again and if the time to run is limited, you have paid up front and you want to run under varying conditions I would suggest some suspension even if it is very limited.

Keith showed last year that with some well thought out suspension you can set a high speed record on really bad salt when most of the other solid suspended cars are parked.

Just my thoughts,

Sum
Logged

russ jensen
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: N.IOWA
Posts: 205





Ignore
spn
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2006, 09:59:13 PM »

Cool I was told the salt was so smoth that I needn't worry about bump stear or any of that, didn't quite beleive @ time , must be salt isn't always smoth, I keep thinking about the yellow crosley that went airborne @ 300+, Tape said he lost wheel but it looked like he hit a small bump that resulted in [what a ride] can't beleive he survived it.
Logged

speed is expensive-how fast do you want to go?-to soon old & to late smart.
Dynoroom
Global Moderator
Hero Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 60
Location: Chino Hills, Ca.
Posts: 1985




« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2006, 12:22:35 PM »

Quote from: russ jensen
Cool I was told the salt was so smoth that I needn't worry about bump stear or any of that, didn't quite beleive @ time , must be salt isn't always smoth, I keep thinking about the yellow crosley that went airborne @ 300+, Tape said he lost wheel but it looked like he hit a small bump that resulted in [what a ride] can't beleive he survived it.


Russ, Earl did in fact have a right rear tire go down, this allowed the front to pitch up (looking as though it went over a bump) The tire was blistered badly and deflated. He had this problem (blistering) on a previous run but didn't put 2 & 2 tegether 'till after the crash.
Logged

Michael LeFevers
Kugel and LeFevers Pontiac Firebird

Without Data You're Just Another Guy With An Opinion!

Racing is just a series of "Problem Solving" events that allow you to spend money & make noise...
russ jensen
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: N.IOWA
Posts: 205





Ignore
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2006, 07:02:29 PM »

smiley 2 pt ? why do tires blister, was he spinning them and getting them hot. doesn't seem like the run would last long enoudh to get hot ? I rember somebody telling me that [I think it was vesco streamliner which had a bunch f cords hanging from rim] [ some multy ply tires from micky's chalanger] was told he had 500mph power & 400 mph car and spun all 4 wheels the length of course,  I degress; or was it low air pressure. 2nd part, if I rember he was running some pretty wide tires on back , is this a problem with open wheeld cars running eagles??
Logged

speed is expensive-how fast do you want to go?-to soon old & to late smart.
JackD
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 71
Location: The great race track in the heavens above
Posts: 4684




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2006, 07:31:12 PM »

If you consider how tires are assembled, you will understand how they come apart.
 The strength is in the cord body.
 The rubber keeps the pressure in to help hold the shape and the tread provides the
 contact patch to allow the power to contact the drive surface.
The tread is bonded to the case and is the point of failure with a blister.
 Grab up a truck tread along the highway and take a close look at it.
The results are the same.   Like a grinding wheel. if your object is going the same speed
as the grinding surface it produces very little heat.
 Get them going at different speeds like tire spin and heat happens.
Lots of HP produces lots of heat right away when it is put through a very small area and failures occur.
Logged

"I would rather lose going fast enough to win than win going slow enough to lose."
"That horrible smell is dirty feet being held to the fire"
russ jensen
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: N.IOWA
Posts: 205





Ignore
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2006, 09:23:55 PM »

smiley Do open wheel cars get enough cooling from the high speed air to avoid this problem?Huh
Logged

speed is expensive-how fast do you want to go?-to soon old & to late smart.
JackD
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 71
Location: The great race track in the heavens above
Posts: 4684




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2006, 09:33:09 PM »

A shrouded tire will build more heat with all things being equal.
Things are never equal and the tires see different conditions every run.
 One driver might have repeated failures and another in the same machine might make them last a long time.
Power, conditions, and technique all contribute to the life of the tire just like the resultant speed.
Logged

"I would rather lose going fast enough to win than win going slow enough to lose."
"That horrible smell is dirty feet being held to the fire"
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page August 08, 2017, 05:49:33 PM