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Author Topic: newbe considering getting started.  (Read 4747 times)
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Seldom Seen Slim
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Nancy -- 201.913 mph record on a production ZX15!


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« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2010, 01:15:40 PM »

Could be, Fred.  We used MUL-B last year, too.  I still think he's got a pair of unleaded.  I'll go check his site and see if he says which he takes to the Salt.
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Jon E. Wennerberg
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McRat
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« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2010, 02:15:33 PM »

Thoughts:

I agree your estimate for safety equipment is low.  Pretty much double any estimate you come up with.  Such is the life of a speed freak.
For me, helmet, firesuit, gloves, shoes, were about $2000 alone, but I'm legal for any speed, and fire safety is very important for me.  Chute, 2 fire systems, window clips, roof rails, window film were about another $2000.  Seat, padding, harness were $500.  Cage?  Not sure how much.  It was over $3000, but I used chrome moly, and twice as many bars as the minimum requirement, and I had someone who is very good with TIG and cages do it (Mitch, the same guy who did the Hot Rod Magazine Special).  Keep in mind the SCTA cage rules are NOT the same as NHRA, so if you are going back to the dragstrip ever again, read both rulebooks before starting.

And tires are problematic if the existing record in your class is over 200.  There are very few "cheap" LSR tires.  If you can find a class you can run that is under 200, you can run cheap speed rated tires.  Or run time-only up to 199.999. 

Sea level HP is not the same up in Bonneville.  It's about 6000-7000' DA in August.  I don't have concrete #'s, but often N/A car will add .7 to 1.0 second drag racing at Bandimere (6500'?).  You can run higher than normal compression in thin air, and you'll have to jet down, and advance the timing.  If you can spend a day in SLC at a dyno shop for tuning, it might save you some time.

Might sound like a hassle, but it is worth it.  To race along side some of today's premier hotrodders on the legendary Bonneville salt cannot be described by words or pictures.  If you are gearhead, you will be in heaven.
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holland
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« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2010, 10:43:09 PM »

What is the reason that the parachutes have such a long line.  I have  one availble that is used at the drag strip,would'nt it work just as well?
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Bville701
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« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2010, 12:55:38 AM »

Not all parachutes have a long line. Our parachute is from a drag race vehicle and works fine for our application, but every car is different. Some cars need longer lines so the the "chute" doesn't ride high. A "chute" that rides high could possibly pick up the rear of the car causing an accident. A lot of us have seen this happen. Now, I don't know much about parachute length, but I'm sure that if you call Deist, Stroud, or DJ Safety they would all be willing to give some insight on the subject. www.deist.com www.stroudsafety.com www.djsafety.com
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Ryan LeFevers

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Brian Westerdahl
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« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2010, 05:14:10 PM »

The reason for the different lengths in the parachute line is that you want to get the chute into clean air.  The air is dirty or turbulent behind the car and all cars are different.  You need to experiment and talk to people to find out what has worked for them.  There is alot of expertise here on this site.


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Glen
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« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2010, 06:09:16 PM »

Brian is right on the clean air or so called sweet spot. The other thing is the faster one goes the smaller the chute dia. The high speed chute is first out and the med.speed usually has a shorter tow line so the chutes don't tangle. The Vesco 444 streamliner has a high speed chute with a 70 foot tow line. Every car is different due to design and turbulence caused by body design and other factors. Talk to the experts first with what you want to run.
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Glen
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holland
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« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2010, 07:30:14 PM »

I've learned so much in just a short time already. Only because of this forum..       I can see that I'm not going to do things over as much because I got it wrong.   I've learned the hard way from drag racing over the years that if I built my car right the first time,I could have cut the cost by 2/3rds.           Thanks again for all the help.
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