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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 1014417 times)

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Offline Jon

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #990 on: December 22, 2012, 11:38:16 AM »
It's not hard to see what tree that CB1100 fell from, would look right at home sitting next to my 1976 CB550 SS.

jon
Underhouse Engineering
Luck = Opportunity + Preparation^3

Online Peter Jack

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #991 on: December 22, 2012, 05:13:50 PM »
The way a stock motorcycle should look like! We used to refer to the look as UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) and the English had a similar look before that.

Pete

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #992 on: December 22, 2012, 05:14:32 PM »
These are the new 500cc parallel twins.  The cylinders tilt slightly forward like a 305 superhawk.  Specs:

CBR500R (optional ABS), 471cc DOHC liquid cooled parallel twin, seat height 30.9 inches, weight 425 lbs w/o ABS, 430 lbs with it, Colors Red, White/Blue/Red, Red
CB500F (optional ABS), 471cc DOHC liquid cooled parallel twin, seat height 30.9 inches, weight 420 lbs w/o ABS, 424 with it, colors Pearl White, Black

The CBR500R would be the bike I would buy if I could purchase any one of them at the show.  

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #993 on: December 23, 2012, 11:26:04 AM »
Jon, you are not alone.  There were a lot of people looking at that bike.  Mostly they were old silverbacks like us.

Pete, the standard bike is rare now.  This Honda and the Triumph Bonnevilles are about the only ones left. 

A while ago I was looking for a new oil.  The price is raised on the Mobil 1 to the point where I have no incentive to use it.  The people at Cascade Moto Classics help me a lot and I want to use an oil they sell.  It is good promotion for them.  This narrowed my choices a bit - Mobil 1 or Silkolene.  Mobil 1 never gives a detailed and specific answer.  The Silkolene company has the opposite approach and this is the deciding factor for oil choice.  Advice I have from Silkolene is the Pro-4 10W-40 is a 50% ester, 50% PAO mix, it was their top of the line oil till a few years ago, it comes in 10W-40, and it is recommended for street use.  The also make Pro-4 Plus 05W-40, a 75% ester, 25% PAO blend, and it is their current premium oil.  It is more expensive.  The added protection from the higher ester content makes it their recommended oil for racing.  They suggested that I do a dyno comparison with the two oils to see which one makes the most power.  The new engine will be tight this year and I will use the Pro-4 Plus, after that the Pro-4 will be good enough.

A friend in my youth had BSA 441cc Victor Shooting Star.  It was a pretty bike with its red and white fiberglass tank.  The Victor engine was developed from the Triumph Tiger Cub motor and it was as reliable as a hand grenade.  An oil seal would pop out from the engine when he rode it hard.  Oil went everywhere.  We traced this problem to excess crank case pressure.  Combustion gas blow by past the rings pressurized the lower end when he was riding hard.  The standard BSA engine breather could not bleed the gas out in time to prevent trouble.  This pressure also hurts performance, I learned later.

The job here is installing an extra breather on the filler hole where the oil is poured into the crankcase.  The plug has metric threads and I could not make one on the lathe.  It was hard to find a plug that could be modified.  Finally, I found one, it is Part # NBCA-1050S, LCF Custom OIl Filler Cap, Silver, see www.lcfabrications.com

Some sort of baffle is needed to keep the oil that flies around in the engine from going up the breather pipe.  I drill four holes in the bottom of the plug and one big one in the top.  Hopefully this will catch the oil and it will drip down rather than blow up through the pipe.  The brass spigot for the hose is turned from a piece of 1/4 inch ID brass gas line with pipe style threads.  The rubber hose is from the Triumph pollution control system that almost everyone removes, often called the "octopus."  A PCV valve and oil catch tank will be made, too.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #994 on: December 23, 2012, 11:27:20 AM »
More case breather pix.

Offline Graham in Aus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #995 on: December 23, 2012, 06:30:13 PM »
Nice job Bo!  :-D

Good to see that lathe get some jobs done!  :cheers:

Graham 8-)

Offline Koncretekid

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #996 on: December 24, 2012, 05:32:04 AM »
"A friend in my youth had BSA 441cc Victor Shooting Star.  It was a pretty bike with its red and white fiberglass tank.  The Victor engine was developed from the Triumph Tiger Cub motor and it was as reliable as a hand grenade.  An oil seal would pop out from the engine when he rode it hard.  Oil went everywhere."

I resemble that remark!  Luckily the B50 is an improvement, but still likes to pressurize the crankcase with the resultant oil leaks.  The B50 breathes thru the primary case, where we attach a PCV valve at the outlet.  Seems to help.  Make sure all other breathers have a PCV valve as well.  Also, I've read that these PCV valves need to be as close to the crankcase as possible.
We get too soon oldt, and too late schmart!
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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #997 on: December 24, 2012, 05:00:15 PM »
The Victor had a kick starter mechanism gear that was mounted on the end of one of the transmission shafts.  The countershaft, I recall.  The bikes would kick back when fellows started them and the ends of the shafts would break off.  There was a condition attached when I wrote up the work orders for them.  "No guarantee.  We will not start the bike.  That is for you to do."  Folks understood and accepted that.  I repaired a few.  It was an expensive job.  BSA, to their credit, did something.  The Victors were the only bikes that had the problem, that I know of.  Actually, I like the single cylinder BSA's.  A Starfire 250 was one of my favorites and I wish I would have kept it.

 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #998 on: December 24, 2012, 05:25:22 PM »
The crank came back today.  A most excellent Christmas present.  The price was reasonable at $80 for the dynamic balance.  It did not need heavy metal addition, just filling some of the old balance holes in the crank webs with weld.  "We balanced it at a 52% balance factor that should make it really smooth 2,500 and up" according to Larry Revis of Revco Precision in Long Beach.  Revco has experience with these engines and was why I chose them to do the work.
   
This engine, along with the other Bonnevilles and Thruxtons, has a 360 degree crank where the pistons rise and fall together and the mixture is lit on alternate strokes.  This is the traditional configuration for British twins.   The Americas, Speedmasters, and Scramblers have 270 degree cranks where the big end journals are offset 90 degrees to each other.  These latter motors are a lot smoother.  As I understand, it was either Phil Irving or Phil Vincent, of Vincent fame, that first suggested this idea for a vertical twin.  Given the choice, I would build this engine with a 270 degree crank. 

This is a street motor with a 8,400 rpm redline and it will hardly ever be over 8,000.  The cranks are not knife edged.  Triumph Performance recommends knife edging the crank for high rpm race motors and they can see 10,000 rpm.  Knife edging will almost certainly require crank web drilling and the addition of heavy metal. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #999 on: December 29, 2012, 07:27:59 PM »
There are secret plans for the new big motor that will not be discussed here.  One aspect is the possibility, probability actually, of some blowby past the rings that will pressurize the crank case.  This is detrimental to power output and it might pop out a seal or gasket.  An extra case breather is installed and both breathers need to be connected to a catch tank.  Standard practice is simply to stuff the hose ends into a little tomato paste can and call it good.  There is an overall plan to do things less hillbilly on this new build.  A purpose built catch tank is in order.

All parts of the tank except the o-rings and hose clamps for the Tauruck tube were made from stuff laying around the cellar.  I was having so much fun I decided to make all of the brass fittings - so I spent $30 for a brass rod.  There went the project budget.

 

Offline Koncretekid

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1000 on: December 31, 2012, 05:45:13 AM »
And I thought my Canadian flagged stainless steel water bottle catch can was cool.  You didn't use a single pop-rivet????  Impressive!
We get too soon oldt, and too late schmart!
Life's uncertain - eat dessert first!

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1001 on: December 31, 2012, 09:43:48 PM »
It has been raining here for weeks.  The last few days have been a little bit sunny.  Bored semi-old guy + big junkpile + lots of time = some nice little trinkets.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1002 on: December 31, 2012, 10:43:13 PM »
There will be Marines in the Rose Bowl parade tomorrow.  They will be wearing uniforms from the early days to the present.  The one in the Desert Storm uniform is my middle boy, Josef. 

Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1003 on: January 01, 2013, 02:33:54 PM »
That's an honour of note. Good on you Josef. I'll look out for him.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1004 on: January 01, 2013, 07:46:50 PM »
Tauruck, this is good duty for him and he feels proud, although he did not say it.  He was near the beginning of the parade and said he walked 6 miles while waving at people.  His arms are tired.  That is the biggest parade I have seen and I missed the very beginning.  I was out in the woodshed, lighting the fire, or feeding the cats.  Nice warm Southern California was looking good this morning.

This Lamba meter setup was all connected together in a Prince Albert tobacco can.  Totally Mickey Mouse and the next trick is to get it squared away.