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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 670923 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #840 on: August 15, 2012, 11:33:29 PM »

Drop handlebar?  Shades of Burt Munro, it is.  Most of my internal fairing bracing and steering damper is in the way.

The handlebar was trimmed 3/8 inch on each end.  The sides were opened up as per FIM rules where the rider's arms and hands must be visible.  Now I have 1 inch of clearance all around.  Looking from the front, all of this is behind the widest part of the fairing and nothing is out in the wind.  Opening things up a bit should have a minimal, if any, effect on aero.  I will probably leave it like it is for AUS.

The bike will be on display with me there to talk about it this Saturday between 10:00 and 2:00 at Cascade Moto Classics, 13705 Farmington Road, Beaverton, Oregon, (503) 374-3353.


* Fairing Rebuild 174.JPG (157.68 KB, 800x533 - viewed 122 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 175.JPG (121.19 KB, 800x533 - viewed 131 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #841 on: August 16, 2012, 11:32:51 PM »

The bike is done and on the trailer.  Side views with me on and off of it.  Bradley's book "The Racing Motorcycle" is what I used with a few tricks of my own.

The wheelbase is lengthened 3 inches by stretching the swing arm.  This puts some more weight on the front wheel and it helps the handling.  A six inch stretch is recommended for LSR.

Rear set foot pegs are best for LSR.  It is easier to tuck down if your legs and feet are back.  My foot pegs are half sets.  This is halfway between the standard location and rear sets.  Rose rides with me so I cannot move them too far back.  She needs room for her feet.

The 3 inch longer swing arm and half sets gives a good weight distribution for street riding.  Better than the standard bike.   


* Fairing Rebuild 176.JPG (209.95 KB, 800x451 - viewed 179 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 177.JPG (240.57 KB, 800x465 - viewed 138 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #842 on: August 16, 2012, 11:47:39 PM »

The front and the back.  The angle of convergence toward the tail is the maximum that will allow attached flow.  The tail is truncated.  Most of the aero literature says this causes a lot of base drag.  It seems their data is based on solid shapes.  My tail is open and it is likely to create a lot less base drag than the formulae indicate.

Engine cooling must work well.  I need to keep the temperature down if I intend to a run at full throttle for three miles and gain speed toward the end.  An overheating motor would slow down as it heats up.  The oil radiator and cam towers block a lot of paths for cool air to reach the cylinder head so cooling can be problematic.  The problem baffled me.  I used the spermatazoa method.  The engine is flooded with lots more cool air than it needs and hopefully a small amount will get to the important place.
   


* Fairing Rebuild 178.JPG (178.56 KB, 405x640 - viewed 205 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 179.JPG (208.38 KB, 512x800 - viewed 142 times.)
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saltwheels262
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« Reply #843 on: August 17, 2012, 06:36:15 PM »

it turned out nice.
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bub '07 - 140.293 a/pg   120" crate street mill  
bub '10 - 158.100  sweetooth gear
lta  7/11 -163.389  7/17/11; 3 run avg.-162.450
ohio -    - 185.076 w/#684      
lta 8/14  - 169.xxx. w/sw2           
'16 -- 0 runs ; 0 events -- made a 2 state change in ZIP codes

" it's not as easy as it looks. "
                            - franey  8/2007
Peter Jack
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« Reply #844 on: August 17, 2012, 09:36:28 PM »

You're certainly well tucked in Bo. Good luck!!! grin grin grin

Pete
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #845 on: August 19, 2012, 12:37:41 AM »

This motorcycle racing can be scary to think about.  It really makes sense to be safely tucked in a nice roadster for this LSR business.  I love to design and build these things.  Riding them is different.  Every year it is the same.  I get the heebee geebies about now and they do not go away until I am waved off for the first run.  My thinking clears up when the flag drops.  The first run is usually good and it shows me I was worried about nothing.  Then I make my second run with no anxiety.

Zillions of years of evolution give is the instincts to avoid doing dumb things.  Us bike racers must completely turn this off for a while.  It is hard to do.   
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JimL
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« Reply #846 on: August 19, 2012, 01:10:47 AM »

I found our Modified Roadster a lot more scary than the bike.  I like the single thrust line of the bike.

Have a fun time.....we'll be watching results soon!

JimL
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DND
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« Reply #847 on: August 19, 2012, 02:44:08 AM »

Heck i use to get the heebe Geebes running my B/Gasser in the 60's, after the first run then i could eat and all was ok.

I think a lot of guys & gals get them too just part of the driving package, but when you do good it is all worth it then and that is what keeps us in the seat with the gas WFO.

Don
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #848 on: August 20, 2012, 01:14:07 AM »

Pete, Jim, and Don, thanks for the encouragement.  This is a development year and I will be busy collecting data and trying different things.  There will not be much time to worry and and the first run or two will be at part throttle while I gather tire slip data.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #849 on: August 22, 2012, 08:06:06 PM »

The smallest rear sprocket in my collection had 38 teeth.  Last year the bike could pull a 40 tooth one.  I thought the 38 would be plenty small.  About three weeks ago I had a momentary burst of clear thinking.  Is a 38 that small enough?  First I looked at my speed vs power vs aero chart and figured out how fast I could go.  Then I did some calculating to figure the engine rpm at those speeds.  The 38 was OK for the added speed the 84 horsepower would make me go with last year's drag coefficient and frontal area.  It was too big a sprocket if the new aero helped me.  I needed to get 37 and 36 tooth sprockets quick.

A call to Sidewinder in St Charles, Illinois (630) 513-1000 did the trick.  Two billet sprockets arrived today at a reasonable price on very, very, short notice.  Normally I like them hardened.  There was no time for that.  These folks are more famous for dirt bike stuff.  They can do other things, too.


* 2012 BUB 1.JPG (273.83 KB, 800x533 - viewed 118 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #850 on: August 23, 2012, 11:27:53 PM »

Kawasaki Mach III's are a topic on Freud's birthday post.

It was 1969 or 1970 and I was in hi skool.  A fellow bought a Mach III.  It was the fastest bike around and he knew it.  He swaggered around and made sure every one else knew about it, too.  He would pass my friends with his front wheel in the air.  No one could keep up with him.  My buddies got to work with heavy figuring and and deep thinking.  They came up with a plan.  All they needed was someone dumb enough to try it.  This is when I enter the picture.

My bike was a 250cc Yamaha DT-1 with K-70 dirt track tires, a high compression head, bigger carb, some port work, and a Schwerma expansion chamber.  It was a dirt bike with lights.  It was not a fast street bike.  It could lean over very far in corners.  Its light weight gave it very precise handling.  All of this was needed.

The school was on a ridge overlooking the town and there were several city streets connecting it to the rest of the city.  All had two lanes in each direction and most had an island to divide the lanes in one direction from those going in another.  The street that Mr Kawasaki used to go home was mostly level for a mile, then it dropped and went down the side of the ridge in a long series of S curves.  Most were flat camber and some were off camber.  A gaggle of fifteen or so school busses also used this route.  Mr Kaw loved to do his after school blast on this road.

Mr Kaw had no power advantages on a steep downhill road, my buddies figured.  He could not handle corners at speed and especially off camber ones.  Our classmates in the school busses would be the witnesses to the whole thing.  My role was to ride in a gap between the buses.  Mr Kaw would pass me and I would pass him back on the downhill turns.

It took a few days for Mr Kaw, the busses, the curves, and me to be in the proper places at the right times.  Mr Kaw suspected nothing.  I never tried to race him before.  One day he blasted pass a couple of busses.  I was in the gap between them and the downhill curves were ahead.  I launched from between the busses and headed for him like a little missile.  He braked for the corners.  I did not.  One quick pass and he was left behind.  I shot down through the S curves and needled between a couple of busses.  He did not have the handling accuracy to follow me.  There was Woodminster shopping district at the bottom of the hill.  I pulled into a side street and hid.

My buddies plan worked.  It was humiliating to be beat by a clown riding a 250 dirt bike.  The guy was quieter after that.  I was too.  The episode scared me into a short bit of sensible behavior.  Anyway, this is my Kawasaki Mach III story.                   
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RidgeRunner
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« Reply #851 on: August 24, 2012, 06:56:43 AM »

    And now we know where your use of logic in measured steps approach to LSR originated  grin

             Ed
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #852 on: August 27, 2012, 04:14:02 PM »

We got here three hours ago.  This is not an optimal situation.  Weathered out for now.  We are ready.  Its like being a stud horse in a corral and the mare is in the pen next door.  No one will come and unlock the gate.  A nice fire in the KOA fire pit and bench racing will be in order tonight.
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Kiwi Paul
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« Reply #853 on: August 27, 2012, 10:57:32 PM »

Best of Luck, Bo. I am looking forward to your report on some successful runs.....
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SaltPeter
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« Reply #854 on: August 28, 2012, 12:01:07 AM »

Great stuff, go fast, keep safe most of all have fun  cheers

Oh yeah Wobbly, Mach 111 Kwakas had a hinge in the middle of the chassis, or mine felt like it, so most bikes went round corners quicker LOL grin

Pete
DLRA#866
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The Mission is to go as fast as possible along on that old Road Less Traveled.
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