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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 713585 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #765 on: April 30, 2012, 09:55:15 PM »

A fellows never knows what will turn up here during spring cleaning.

Not much has been posted about this build.  Rosie's shift schedule changed and we have a lot more days off together.  That one little hen keeps this mighty rooster awfully busy.  She is on vacation in New York and I am trying to get back on track.

Everything is preparation for running in AUS in 2015.  No surprises is the big goal.  That is halfway across the world and getting there is all I can do.  This year I will run as a 1000cc AMA APS-AG.  The record is held by a Triumph Bonneville and I cannot beat it.  APS-AG is an altered partial streamliner with an altered gasoline powered engine.  My bike is for all practical purposes a modified partial streamliner with a production engine.  The longer tail section and the flatslide carbs put me into the altered body and engine classes.  The American AMA and Australian DLRA rules for APS streamlining are similar.  The main difference is the tail.

The AMA says "Streamlining shall not extend beyond the rear edge of the rear tire more than 8 inches.  No streamlining behind the rear axle is permitted to be lower than the top rim of the rear wheel."  The DLRA says "If a streamlined seat/tail section is used, it cannot extend further to the rear than 10 inches beyond the rear edge of the rear tire, or 1/3 of the wheelbase, whichever is less.  No part of the seat/tail section may be closer than 4 inches from the ground, or over 40 inches from the ground with the rider seated."  The AMA and DLRA tails might make the bike handle differently and I want to get this sorted before I go to AUS.  I asked BUB if I could run a tail with deeper skirts to see if the handling will be OK, with the proviso that it disqualifies me from any record.  They have not replied yet.

The AMA and DLRA front sections are similar.  Right now I have an FIM record out on loan and someday it will be time to get it back.  The fairing has cutouts so my hands and arms are visible as per FIM rules.  They are blocked off as allowed by AMA and DLRA rules.  The photo shows how I did it.  It is fairly east to put them in or to take them out.

     

   


* Fairing Rebuild 139.JPG (105.84 KB, 448x256 - viewed 127 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 140.JPG (150.53 KB, 640x427 - viewed 116 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 141.JPG (108.44 KB, 512x395 - viewed 112 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #766 on: May 01, 2012, 10:03:33 PM »

BUB replied.  A bike has to be completely legal with class specs to run in APS.  No longer skirts are allowed, even if no record runs are made.  Plans are to run as an APS bike at BUB this year and to enter speedweek in 2013 if I get the tire dilemma figured out.  The SCTA has the same streamlining rules as the DLRA.  A run or two at speedweek will give me the opportunity to try out the setup I will use in AUS.  Also, a visit to speedweek will give Gretchen and me a chance to see the cars.  It will be the first time for both of us.

The lathe was leveled with a carpenter's level when the pad was formed and poured.  The final leveling should be done with something more accurate.  A machinist level was ordered through Fastenal.  It is an American made Starrett.  The concrete has cured and the forms were knocked off.  The mix I used was bony and there were a lot of voids on the surface.  It was ugly.  There was some blue, pink, and tan grout left over from some tiling jobs.  This was mixed up to make a grey grout and I covered the pad.  The pad is portable and some handles are cast into each end.  The builder's paper under the pad kept it from attaching itself to the floor when it is poured.
 

       


* Lathe 31.JPG (211.56 KB, 800x542 - viewed 99 times.)

* Lathe 32.JPG (249.82 KB, 800x564 - viewed 113 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #767 on: May 02, 2012, 09:13:53 PM »

The machinist level is placed on the ways for the final leveling.  It is much more sensitive and accurate than the carpenter's level.  Shims are put under the feet as needed to level the lathe.  The shims I cut out of 0.005 inch thick brass sheet.  They can be purchased ready-made.  Ask for arbor shims.  The shim stock is a little piece I bought at the hobby shop and it cost me much less money to make my own.  The leveled lathe will cut much more accurately than it would if I had not done this.  A lathe that cuts a taper when making long shafts usually needs to be leveled.  This is the last lathe post.     


* Lathe 33.JPG (155.38 KB, 800x435 - viewed 85 times.)

* Lathe 34.JPG (265.01 KB, 800x550 - viewed 85 times.)
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Jon
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« Reply #768 on: May 06, 2012, 04:27:11 PM »

Looking good Bo, a lathe will make a lot of jobs so much easier.

Any updates on your windscreen?

Cheers
jon
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #769 on: May 07, 2012, 12:21:22 AM »

The windshield was brought home on Friday.  Geoff at Kent Plastics did the job for a reasonable $85 USD covering labor and materials.  Kent Plastics makes all sorts of plastic items using different materials for various purposes.  My feelings are:  they are generalists and they do as good of work as can be expected from anyone except a specialist in polycarbonate forming.

The material is Makrolon, a polycarbonate.  The sheet stuck onto the plastic is shown.  This is a legal windshield material in AMA, DLRA, FIM, USFRA, and SCTA.  The material is very clear.  There is none of the bluish or yellowish tint that some clear plastics possess.

The windshield was vacuum formed.  It is shown on the table like it was removed from the mold.  Some sawing is needed to cut off the flange and the back side.  The next few posts will discuss what I would do different next time and the things I did correctly.

 


* Fairing Rebuild 142.JPG (209.26 KB, 777x600 - viewed 98 times.)

* Fairing Rebui;ld 143.JPG (180.07 KB, 800x454 - viewed 199 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #770 on: May 07, 2012, 11:50:57 PM »

Several materials were considered for this windshield.  Aircraft grade acrylic was one.  There are several quality grades.  The premium ones for military helicopter windshields seem to be most appropriate.  The advantages are it can be drape or vacuum formed over the mold, it is comparatively easy to polish out defects, and it has less memory.  In other words, there is less tendency for it to assume its original flat state when it cools.  The disadvantages are it is not known if it is accepted by some sanctioning bodies and it is expensive.  The local shops in my area wanted me to buy a whole sheet to get the one little windshield.  They said they do not use the stuff on a normal basis and they do not want the leftovers.  This seems fair.  Unfortunately a single sheet costs over $500 for a lesser quality grade and just under $1,000 for the best grade.  This is too much money for the old walrus.  No acrylic for this guy.

PETG was considered.  Many grades are impact resistant and some are used for airplane windshields.  It can be drape or vacuum formed over the mold and the cost is very reasonable.  Just under $100 for a sheet of impact resistant material, as I recall.  See the Utah Belly Tank build diary by Elmo Rodge.  This is what I wanted to do and did not.  I was worried about SCTA and DLRA approval.

The polycarbonate is what I chose.  It could not be drape formed over the compound curves on this windshield.  It has too much memory.  It could be vacuum formed and that is the method that was used.

The shield is shown on the mold.  It shrank about 1/8 to 1/4 inch in length when it cooled and it cannot fit entirely over the mold.  I was aware this would happen and the fairing is not finished where it will attach to the windshield.  This will be done with the windshield in place.  This way, everything will fit.


* Fairing Rebuild 144.JPG (165.04 KB, 800x477 - viewed 101 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 145.JPG (190.59 KB, 800x487 - viewed 108 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #771 on: May 08, 2012, 10:47:32 PM »

The windshield is vacuum formed with a flange around it.  It is awkward to cut it off with any of the saws I have.  This tile cutting bit in a Dremel tool does the job.

The mold was made on the bike.  It is put back on and the windshield is put on top of it.  Now it is time to form the sheet metal around the windshield base.


* Fairing Rebuild 146.JPG (259.05 KB, 703x600 - viewed 104 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 147.JPG (203.16 KB, 800x567 - viewed 98 times.)
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« Reply #772 on: May 08, 2012, 11:03:38 PM »

Very interesting build. Tony
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« Reply #773 on: May 08, 2012, 11:44:26 PM »

Hi Tony.  A few of your ideas have been adapt-a-fitted into this thing.  We share a few things in common.  Both of us are new at this and we bring in experience from other areas of motorsport. 
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #774 on: May 20, 2012, 10:27:36 PM »

This book is fairly recent with a 2011 copyright date.  It is ISBN 978-1-934709-47-4 "Performance Automotive Engine Math" by John Baechtel.  The book lists a lot of formulas like many others.  The difference between it and most are the explanations about what the numbers mean.  John is a land speed racer and there is a lot in the book that is useful for this.  It is money well spent for this guy.  The chapter on atmospherics and combustion math, by itself, made the book worth the purchase price.


* Good Bedtime Book.JPG (273.86 KB, 708x600 - viewed 103 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #775 on: May 22, 2012, 11:10:52 PM »

The lathe was taken apart, all parts inspected and cleaned, and it was adjusted and put together.  Only two gears were damaged, the bevel gears for the automatic cross feed on the carriage.  They work for now and I will find another pair in good condition.  All of this taking apart and putting together showed me how everything works.

In my apprentice days we moved from machine to machine through the shop.  I started on a planer, then the broacher, a mill, and a shaper.  The drill press and a file were part of the program, too.  The last machine before graduation to journeyman was the lathe.  The journeymen "picked their machine."  They were expected to master them and they rarely switched from one to another.  The job was boring most of the time.  Many of the same parts were made and I watched the same things go back and forth or spin around all day.  It was a dark and smoky place and I smelled like a fish at the end of the day.  The cutting oil.  A mechanic's job supported me when I was going through machinist school.  That was a much better job - I was always doing something interesting.  I quit before I got my journeyman card.  This is something I always regret.  I never ran the lathe.  The only time I used one was in school.  Now I get an opportunity to learn what I missed.   

   


* Lathe 35.JPG (226.74 KB, 800x533 - viewed 104 times.)

* Lathe 36.JPG (233.82 KB, 800x537 - viewed 113 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #776 on: May 23, 2012, 10:15:09 PM »

Grinding and wood work happen in this cellar.  Sawdust and grit are the by products.  It is a good idea to cover the lathe.  This cover is on sale at Cycle Gear at 50 percent off.  $19.95 and the sale is still happening.  A great machine cover.  The "Cruiser" size fits perfect.  This is the last lathe post.


* Lathe 37.JPG (238.95 KB, 800x533 - viewed 93 times.)

* Lathe 38.JPG (212.91 KB, 800x533 - viewed 98 times.)
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Jonny Hotnuts
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« Reply #777 on: May 23, 2012, 11:08:05 PM »

Mr. WobblyWalrus,


I was wondering if your team name was taken from the PD Eastman book:



Stupid question, just had to know.

~JH
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« Reply #778 on: May 24, 2012, 11:10:57 PM »

Yes, the dogs are the inspiration for the team.  They are faster.  It will take awhile to go like them.  Burt Munro is an inspiration, too.  Strangely, I get the occasional urge to pee on a tree.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #779 on: May 28, 2012, 11:43:03 PM »

Polycarbonate is not the easiest plastic to form.  Several methods were discussed with plastics formers in Salem and Portland.  Vacuum molding was the best and probably only method that could be done with the equipment and expertise around here, I gathered from the conversations.  The local ovens are not very big.  My mold was 22 inches wide and it barely fit in the forming oven.

The windshield is a bit narrow and some windows are added to get side vision.  They are lexan and they are cut out of a Triumph windshield that Cascade Moto Classics had in their attic.

Tomorrow morning I will add the tachometer and the Spitfire decals to the sides.  This big fairing project will be finished.  The time I am spending on the build is controversial.  I get up real early in the morning and do most of it before work.  That way I can be with the family in the evenings.  It is a good system except I cannot get a lot of sleep.  It will be a good day when this thing is done for the year.


* Fairing Rebuild 150.JPG (217.22 KB, 800x533 - viewed 86 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 151.JPG (186.75 KB, 800x533 - viewed 100 times.)
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