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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 713740 times)
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thefrenchowl
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« Reply #540 on: September 18, 2011, 12:33:28 PM »

Yes, wider is better as far as streamlining goes... Wixon Brothers replica stuff here:

http://www.airtech-streamlining.com/Harley/XR750TT1970-74.htm

Main page, they sell a lot of replica stuff:

http://www.airtech-streamlining.com/

Patrick
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #541 on: September 18, 2011, 11:10:51 PM »

Patrick, that Airtech and replica stuff looks good.  Ordering the streamlining and adapting it to fit would be the smart way to do it.  Anyway, these three posts tonight show the other way to approach the problem.

The gap between the back of the windshield and the rider's helmet should be kept to a minimum according to Bradley.  I put on the monkey suit and my helmet and laid down on the bike with my helmet on the chin rest.  My cute blond laboratory assistant took a side shot.  Next she took a level and put it against my helmet, held it vertical, and made a mark on the bike directly under the top of my helmet.  She also made marks on the chin pad where my helmet contacted it. 


* Fairing Rebuild 5.JPG (166.45 KB, 640x427 - viewed 240 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 6.JPG (199.61 KB, 640x427 - viewed 200 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #542 on: September 18, 2011, 11:30:56 PM »

This is the second of the three posts.  Now I use the photo she took and the marks on the bike to position my helmet exactly as if I was in it and I clamp five guide bars to the bike.  One bar on each side represents the sides of the streamlined shape.  One bar loops up over the bike to show the streamlined shape in end view, and another bar extends from the nose to the bar that loops over the top.

The side view picture shows the bar that goes from the nose to the loop.  This gentle curve would be the ideal shape.  I clamp the back of my windshield to the bar in a location a few inches in front of my helmet.  The windshield is mounted to my old dashboard and the tachometer is attached to it.  My notes from previous runs say the windshield is at the ideal height when the bottom of the tachometer is at the same height as the top of the headlight.  I move the loop up and down until the windshield is at this height.

The front view picture shows the bar that loops over the bike.  The "Bell" sticker on my helmet is a couple of inches above my eyes.  The photo shows that I am looking through the dashboard.  I go to the back of the bike and look through my helmet to the front.  I adjust the windshield height a little bit until I am looking through it correctly.

 


* Fairing Rebuild 7.JPG (185.86 KB, 640x427 - viewed 178 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 8.JPG (175.33 KB, 640x472 - viewed 238 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #543 on: September 18, 2011, 11:38:17 PM »

This is the last of tonight's three posts.  This is a top view from the ladder.  It shows the back section that was built to a tapered shape last year.  The guide bars alongside the bike are visible and they show the taper.  The camera angle exaggerates the taper.  It is slightly less than the ten degree maximum described by Bradley.

These guide bars will not be part of the fairing or tail.  They are there to give me reference points for the design fine-tuning and fabrication.  It is beer-thirty on a warm Sunday afternoon.  Enough fabrication for one day.


* Fairing Rebuild 9.JPG (187.3 KB, 640x427 - viewed 183 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #544 on: September 20, 2011, 11:47:59 PM »

The fairing layout did not look right.  It seemed to be too big.  Yesterday Rosie took some pictures from the front and sides with me on the bike.  I unloaded the photos on the computer and looked at them.  The opening was too small.  Then I adjusted the guide bars, Rosie took photos, and I looked at them.  After the third try everything looked OK.  The bigger opening will keep my shoulders, hands, and arms out of the wind.  This taught me a lesson.  The streamlining must consider the rider.  I fill in the hole behind this fairing and together we make a nice aerodynamic shape.  Also, I learned that the camera is a valuable design tool.  Today I started to do more metal bashing. 


* Fairing Rebuild 10.JPG (218.84 KB, 668x600 - viewed 193 times.)

* Fairing Rebuild 11.JPG (260.72 KB, 800x589 - viewed 180 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #545 on: September 22, 2011, 10:46:12 PM »

The Cook Shootout performance of Poteet, Main, Dutweiler and crew means a lot to this backwoods boy.  It would not mean as much if it was a three engine six wheel drive car or some other technological complication.  Instead they are breaking the big records with a single engine two wheel drive car.  A car that is much more similar to our typical rides.  This is way cool and it is traditional hot rodding at its best.   
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bones
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« Reply #546 on: September 23, 2011, 05:42:14 PM »

Hey Wobbly
   You're at it already.
   I enjoyed meeting you and your
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bones
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« Reply #547 on: September 23, 2011, 06:20:21 PM »

Wobbly I'll try again
 I think you are on the right track with the fairing.
 I bought a magazine (Bike from the UK) the other day with a test of 3 Yamaha Diversons
  n/a ,modified -56hp --  115mph
  NOS injected- 57hp --  116mph
  standard with modified fairing-47hp-  123mph
  The fairing used is a "Peel Mountain Mile" from a Manx or G50
  They calculated 69hp is needed for a standard bike to match the faired one.
  Hope to see you next year.
   cheers    Bones
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Koncretekid
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« Reply #548 on: September 23, 2011, 07:06:59 PM »

Bo,
I'm thoroughly enjoying your fairing build, as it is what I have to do for next year.  Big difference is I have to start from scratch.  How do you plan to make your windshield?

Also, I can see a couple of problems with your build.  Your footwear is not appropriate, and that big Acura chain attached to your carport column is going to slow you down.....

When I get started, which probably won't be until I get back to N.S., I'll keep everyone posted.

Tom
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« Reply #549 on: September 26, 2011, 01:01:47 AM »

Bones, those numbers from the UK seem reasonable.  The tail is as important, or more, than the shape of the front.  Did they put on a tail piece?  We will be there next year, too.  It was nice to meet you.

Tom, look on Scooter Grubbs website.  The 2011 BUB pictures are posted and the bikes are in numerical order.  There is a familiar looking yellow BSA in a few pictures.  The windshield is something I will have made for me by a professional.  There are some complex curves in it.  A bit much for me to figure out.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #550 on: September 28, 2011, 12:04:44 AM »

Our team records are 2007 AMA 1000cc Modified Partial Streamliner, Production Engine, 2008 1000cc AMA Modified Partial Streamliner, Production Engine, 2009 AMA 175cc Modified Partial Streamliner, Production Engine, 2010 FIM Category 1, Group 1, Partially Streamlined, Naturally Aspirated, 1000cc Twin Cylinder flying kilo and mile.  Every bike has gone to impound every year it ran.  Twice we lost records later in the meets.  The Triumph held four at year's end and the Honda one.  I do not mention these in my posts.  This brings bad luck and no more records.  Now I am racing for fun and not records and I will list them just this one time.

None of our bikes have been competitive and we simply were the first to figure out unique combinations.  We show what people can do with a dream, little resources, sketchy talent, and lots of crafty thinking.

The AMA and FIM records are within reach.  The little Triumph could be modified to the extent where I could get them back.  The bike would be fit for only one purpose, LSR, and it would be useless for everything else.  The bike has treated me well and it does not deserve this.  Also, I do not have the money.  The plan is to stick with the street roadster concept, try to get a 150 mph coin at BUB, and race in Australia in 2015.  Simple dreams.     


* Dusty Dry Racers.JPG (454.08 KB, 887x676 - viewed 199 times.)
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bones
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« Reply #551 on: September 28, 2011, 02:04:00 AM »

Bo
   the seat was really basic- a rolled up sheet of something about the size of a orange marker cone.
  If you make it to Aus I'm sure we can look after you.
Remember the place is BIG, you need as much time as you can afford
  cheers   Bones
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #552 on: September 29, 2011, 12:02:17 AM »

Hi Bones.  We are figuring on six weeks total vacation with five weeks in AUS.  One of my friends showed me pictures of his trip there last year.  He said food was expensive.  My, oh my.  I just made a trip to the kitchen and had a big bowl of ice cream on top of oatmeal cookies.  The plan is to fatten up for the trip.  I have until 2015 so I am getting an early start.   
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #553 on: October 02, 2011, 11:45:16 PM »

Financial planning for the year was the big topic this weekend.  The kid's college savings and my racing money all comes out of the a same paycheck.  The girl that comes with me to the races is fourteen.  I asked her about her plans after high school.  I was hoping she would say "I want to join the Marines" like her two oldest brothers.  Or, "I'm off to join the Navy" like her mother.  Or she could say, like I did, "Pops, I am sick of skool.  I want to be a machinist."  She said "I want to go to college."  "What major?" I asked.  "Biochemistry" she chirped, like she already had given it serious thought.  I do not know what this is and they do not teach it at the local community college...

These Triumphs like I have are originally 790 cc or 865 cc depending on the production year.  Mine was a 790 cc model that is upgraded to 865 cc with 10.5 to 1 pistons instead of the standard 9.5 to 1.  The #813 grind cams I have are great street cams that produces lots of mid range power.  They are not the best for Bonneville.  I am looking for cams that give more top end power.

People that race these things typically install big bore kits and sometimes stroker kits to raise the displacement from 904 cc to over 1,000 cc.  This is something I might do in the future.  I cannot afford it right now.  The hot cams are all made for these larger motors.  I asked the expert that helps me if installing the mildest of the racing cams in my 865 would work.  He a said "I do not know and I need to think about this.  That little engine might have enough size and compression to scavenge with the big cams."

My question is, what is scavenging?     
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octane
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« Reply #554 on: October 03, 2011, 12:01:46 AM »

 He said food was expensive.  My, oh my.  I just made a trip to the kitchen and had a big bowl of ice cream on top of oatmeal cookies.  The plan is to fatten up for the trip.  I have until 2015 so I am getting an early start.    
Bo, my man:
you SERIOUSLY crack me up !
Love your posts here !

The girl that comes with me to the races is fourteen.  I asked her about her plans after high school. ... "What major?" I asked.  "Biochemistry" she chirped, like she already had given it serious thought.
That girl, Gretchen, is one h*ll of an allmightingly ( that's probably not a word in the English language ) smart girl !!!
Obey her, with all you can possibly give !!!!!!!


Wonder where she got it from......mmmmm.

« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 12:04:17 AM by octane » Logged

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