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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 530447 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #420 on: March 23, 2011, 09:05:47 PM »

The fork lowering shown a few posts previous is for the little Yamaha.  The Triumph will not be lowered.

Often I will try new things.  There are four things I look at.  First, the basic principles must make sense, second, I need to be able afford it, and third, there has to be an exit strategy.  Fourth, and most important, the change must not cause a bunch of problems in other areas.  The concept of inertia or speed sensitive damping makes sense from a theoretical viewpoint and it costs only a few hundred dollars.  What the heck, I will try it.

There are several companies that make fancy damping valves.  RICOR is in Henderson, Nevada, and they promptly answered my questions in an intelligent manner.  This is a custom application and I had a few.   Also, their modification does not require drilling the damper rod.  Going back to standard simply means draining the fork oil, removing the springs and the valves, and putting the springs back in.  The "exit strategy" is simple.  I chose RICOR Intimidators.  They are custom made for the narrower fork tube internal diameters.

The Intimidators are shown.  I also ordered extra shims and an adjusting tool.  They fit below the fork springs and on the top of the damper rod as shown in the photo.

The fork springs I am using are made for holding up the fairing.  They are stiff for use with out it.  Hopefully the speed sensitive damping will smooth things out when street riding and they will help make things a bit smoother.   


* Valves and Tool.JPG (108.17 KB, 640x329 - viewed 169 times.)

* Valve in Place.JPG (134.66 KB, 640x408 - viewed 159 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #421 on: March 30, 2011, 12:11:34 AM »

Engines are the most expensive part of racing.  Mine are expected to give me five years between builds.  My method is to stash away some money each year in the motor fund between the builds.  I have been stashing away a lot.  All of the easy stuff is done and the next build will cost major $$$.  The hoarding will give me the money I need when I need it.  A brilliant plan.  There is one minor flaw.

The oldest girl works hard as a waitress and she needed a car.  Bus service is cut back because of the depression and she could no get to school.  No problem, I dug into the motor fund for a down payment.  It was tough.  Then there was the new washing machine...  Many months later the motor fund was finally back up to some useful level.  Visions of big valves, titanium, mongo size pistons in billet jugs, all were in my daydreams at work.  Life was good.

Last week the youngest girl and I went up to Portland to retrieve the oldest girl at the airport.  We scheduled an extra few hours in case there was heavy traffic.  There was none and we got there early.  Enough time to nip into a bike shop and get some cartridge fork oil for the Triumf.  The youngest and I have been looking at some small bikes on the second floor for many months.  She is growing fast and wanted to see if she could straddle a bigger scoot.  She sat on various bikes and she picked one she really liked.  A brand new 2009 model.   It was time to go.  Then the salesman showed up.  He said "You want it?  $600 off of the 2009 price and 0% interest for 6 months."  She looked up at me with those big brown eyes and said "I'll take care of it papa."  "I really want to ride."  This girl does all of her chores and gets straight A's in school.  What else could I do?  The motor fund takes a big nuclear bomb hit.

Vaguely on the way home I remembered doing the same thing with my father.  He was a tough old cookie and I paid half of the $869 cost of my new Yamaha DT1.  He took care of the rest.  We bring the new baby home on Saturday and I will post some pix. 
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MC 1314
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« Reply #422 on: March 30, 2011, 06:12:02 AM »

 Wobbly.. That will pay dividends forever! You certainly did the right thing. The only thing I haven't decided on is the color of my 5 year olds first Corvette..lol
Bob
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« Reply #423 on: March 30, 2011, 10:53:03 PM »

What a dad!
Wait 'till she comes up the driveway on a liter bike.
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« Reply #424 on: March 31, 2011, 05:19:32 PM »

Wobbly,
I always enjoy reading your build threads.  A lot of people don't post simple fixes because they must figure everyone else already knows how to do it.  Not So!  

I have two comments.  One about your problem with being able to see out of your helmet.  When I ran my BSA B50 in '09 &'10, I had the same problem.  But by duct taping a firm chunk of foam rubber to the top of the frame (on top of the oil fill on the B50) I was able to rest the front of my helmet on that rubber, which forced my helmet up which allowed me to lower my head.  I picked up 2 mph with that change alone.

In regards to shortening the length of your forks (those pictured on the previous page - Yamaha?), which look a lot like the CB360 ones that I am using on my new build.  Funny how thoughts happen, but I was going to cut a piece out of the damper tube (irreversible), but now realize that all I have to do is add a spacer between the rebound spring and the top of the damper rod, which will limit the travel. Easy and reversible.


* Bonneville 2010.jpg (58.38 KB, 998x602 - viewed 170 times.)
« Last Edit: March 31, 2011, 05:23:48 PM by Koncretekid » Logged

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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #425 on: March 31, 2011, 10:59:54 PM »

Thanks for the compliment.  That foam trick is great.  It works.  So simple yet not obvious.

The tubes arrived from Franks.  The standard tubes weigh 3 lbs 1 oz each.  The thicker tubes are 3 lbs 14 oz.  Showa has bottoming blow-off valves that are pressed in to the tube ends.  I was worried about the Franks tubes.  Would they have the valves?  They do.  Franks installs their own as part of the standard price.  They are held in by circlips.  These tubes from Franks are a good deal when considering the amount of work and material it takes to make them.  Their service was very good. 

The tubes have 1.380-inch inner diameters and these are smaller than standard as mentioned in prior posts.  The Triumph upper springs will not fit.  Progressive Suspension makes some that will and Franks knows the part numbers.  The little topping springs fit around the damping rods and they are often forgotten about.  They must be smaller diameter, too.  Both the longer and shorter springs are being wound in AUS by Ikon.

The damper rods fit in the narrower tubes.  The damper rod rings do not and the end gaps need to be filed larger.  This is just like filing the gaps on piston rings.  The damper rods would need to be drilled to install some types of aftermarket valves.  This is not needed with the Ricor.  It must be specified on ordering that the valves are for a late model Triumph Bonneville with 1.380-inch inner dia tubes.  Otherwise, the valves will not fit.

Ricor specifies AMSOIL 5W fork oil and they developed the valve settings using this oil.  Fork oils in 5 weight, or any other weight, are not all the same viscosity.  There is a lot of variation between brands.  I could not find the AMSOIL locally.  Instead, I am using a high quality cartridge fork oil I can for a good price and I am adjusting the valving as needed for that oil.  It is important that I continue to use the same oil after the adjustment.  Use of another brand might mean a readjustment will be needed.   

     


* Bottoming Valves.JPG (155.27 KB, 800x441 - viewed 170 times.)

* All Sortsa Parts.JPG (178.77 KB, 800x394 - viewed 273 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #426 on: April 03, 2011, 12:49:58 AM »

The little bike came home today.  Gretchen is 13 and it will be a few years before she can ride on the street.  She has time to get dirt and salt experience first, like her older brother, Werner.  Tomorrow we take off the street equipment.  Also, we take off and store the nice new plastic.  Some less expensive aftermarket stuff will be put on for use in the dirt.  She is a happy girl and ready to go.   


* Little Bike Nearside.JPG (336.61 KB, 693x600 - viewed 220 times.)
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Old Scrambler
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« Reply #427 on: April 04, 2011, 04:06:04 PM »

++++ for Wobbly and Gretchen!!!!  Good idea about saving the original plastic.  The next owner will think it was ridden by a 'little old lady'.
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2011 AMA Record - 250cc M-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 82.5 mph
2013 AMA Record - 250cc MPS-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 88.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc M-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 130.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc MPS-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 137.7 mph
Chasis Builder / Tuner: Dave Murre
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #428 on: April 08, 2011, 11:28:35 PM »

Now I have three bikes needing work.  The LSR bike, my dirt bike, and Gretchen's Yamaha.  It is crazy and I am trying to avoid doing things I do not need to do.

The fairing interfered with the low bars and I could not turn.  A fellow at BUB rides from the pits down to the start, makes a run, and circles back to the pits.  Left hand turns all the way, so I trimmed one side.  I could make left turns no problem.  I was done.  Then, in an Einstein-like flash of clear thinking, I realized I might need to make a return run.  The loop would be ridden in reverse and right turns would be the rule.  Drat.  Nothing is simple these days.  I trimmed the other side, too.  Now I can turn in either direction.     


* Cut to Fit.JPG (179.6 KB, 800x533 - viewed 243 times.)
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saltwheels262
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« Reply #429 on: April 09, 2011, 12:25:02 PM »

ww,

you would need to turn to the right on a down run also;
if there were health issues w/ you or the bike.

franey
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bub '07 - 140.293 a/pg   120" crate street mill  
bub '10 - 158.100  sweetooth gear
lta  7/11 -163.389  7/17/11; 3 run avg.-162.450
ohio -    - 185.076 w/#684      
lta 8/14  - 169.xxx. w/sw2           
'16 -- 0 runs ; 0 events -- made a 2 state change in ZIP codes

" it's not as easy as it looks. "
                            - franey  8/2007
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #430 on: April 11, 2011, 12:11:20 AM »

The 2011 build is done for all practical purposes.  The only things left are to finish the front forks, turn it back to a street bike for the summer, and then convert it to a lake bike for BUB.  Any speed gains this year will be due to better aero.  The pictures show last year and this.  A brand new custom cut 40 tooth will go on the back.  I need to remember "toes in, head down, and back straight" when I ride.


* FIM Pix 1 Offside.JPG (183.53 KB, 640x435 - viewed 175 times.)

* Standing Behind Bike with Copyright Ray.jpg (302.6 KB, 800x468 - viewed 177 times.)
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Peter Jack
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« Reply #431 on: April 11, 2011, 02:33:25 AM »

Good luck Wobbly. It definitely has a smoother more streamlined look. Hopefully it will result in more speed. It might be worth doing a little tuft testing if you get a chance and have someone who can do the photography. cheers cheers

Pete
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Koncretekid
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« Reply #432 on: April 11, 2011, 09:30:44 AM »

Wobbly the Walrus (or should that be Lobby the Lobster?)

Great looking body work.  But what class will you be running in?  The tail section now protrudes beyond the rear wheel, so MPS is out.  Maybe APS, or is it FIM?  Or you could add a longer swingarm to get the wheel back to back of tail section, but that would be quite a stretch.

Tom
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We get too soon oldt, and too late schmart!
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #433 on: April 12, 2011, 01:00:12 AM »

Pete, thanks for the idea.  It got my devious mind to thinking and I will do it.  This year I plan to make my runs for time and then, the next day, tuft the bike and run it again.  Scooter Grubb's photos are very good and his normal race photography shows the rivets.  I expect the tufts will be easy to see.  The sheet metal rework is half done.  Next year I am going to move the windshield back to close the gap between the back edge and my helmet, tilt the shield so the trailing edge is flatter, and redo the lower front so it encloses the wheel in a more modern shape.  Then it will be time for some more tuft testing in 2012.

Tom, the old streamlining was legal for AMA MPS.  The new is for FIM partial streamlining and the tail can extend up to 1/2 the rear wheel rim diameter beyond the rear tire and at least 135 degrees of the lower half of the rear wheel must be visible.  The shrouds on the sides could extend farther back and lower if I wanted them to.  The swing arm is as long as it can be and give reasonable handling on twisty roads.  It is extended 3 inches.

These bikes are never finished.  There is always something to do.



 

 
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saltwheels262
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« Reply #434 on: April 12, 2011, 09:09:51 AM »



These bikes are never finished.  There is always something to do.



 

 

how right you are.

like when diane will ask- "are you done in the garage , yet? "
and i answer- " i'll never be done "
after 6 years together , she's starting to get it.

franey
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bub '07 - 140.293 a/pg   120" crate street mill  
bub '10 - 158.100  sweetooth gear
lta  7/11 -163.389  7/17/11; 3 run avg.-162.450
ohio -    - 185.076 w/#684      
lta 8/14  - 169.xxx. w/sw2           
'16 -- 0 runs ; 0 events -- made a 2 state change in ZIP codes

" it's not as easy as it looks. "
                            - franey  8/2007
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