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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 988789 times)

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3585 on: April 02, 2020, 11:35:13 PM »
Another project is to  make a steering stem and some more of the big 12mm diameter engine mounting bolts.  This is where I get round stock.  The 6Al4V alloy is what I use.  They are nice folks.  https://www.grandis.com/

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3586 on: April 05, 2020, 01:57:13 PM »
The conversion from 525 to 520 chain size is complete.  The chain is RK GB520MXZ4 "Premium Motocross Racing Chain."  It is non-O-ring.  These chains without the rings are lighter, have less internal friction, and last much longer than the o-ring chains, in my experience.

The chain is like a conveyor belt and the tire flips salt onto it.  This reduces chain life and it causes a power loss 'cause the stuff needs to be crunched up when it is carried by the chain past the sprocket.  The chain guard is supplemented on the back side to keep the salt off of the chain.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3587 on: April 05, 2020, 01:59:22 PM »
This is the back side of the chain guard and the guard on the bike.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3588 on: April 07, 2020, 10:28:56 AM »
"That project will get done when the wheels are on the race bike."  That is what I told Rose countless times.  Now the wheels are on and it is time to do other things, like build this dog house out of a wine barrel.  No more posts from me for awhile.  The bike is on hold until I get some other things finished.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3589 on: April 08, 2020, 12:35:28 AM »
The whale incident.  This was an old story when I started to work for the highway department in 1985.  It is amazing to see that folks still remember it.https://www.foxnews.com/us/british-town-oregon-exploding-whale-coronavirus-social-distancing   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3590 on: April 10, 2020, 11:09:33 PM »
This is a hard and durable finish for small steel parts like nuts and bolts and brackets.  It is a procedure I have used and modified over several years.  The piece is cleaned and heavy rust, paint, or spooge are removed.  Zinc coating is applied.  This paint in the can works best although the spray version will also work.  The canned paint has more zinc.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3591 on: April 10, 2020, 11:15:35 PM »
Between 20 to 30 minutes after the zinc paint is applied header paint is sprayed on.  The two paints mingle together.  The zinc gives good corrosion resistance while the header paint provides toughness.

There are three heat cycles listed on the header paint can.  I do the first two 'cause the kitchen oven cannot get hot enough for the third cycle.  The paint is dry and the part is ready to install when it cools down.     

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3592 on: April 18, 2020, 01:03:04 PM »
The connecting rods had 5/16 inch diameter bolts.   Some calculations were done assuming the engine speed was 10,000 rpm.  The tensile stresses on the rod bolts were very close to the steel yield strength.  The engineers at Carrillo also did some calculations and said the preload needed to be higher and they gave me a recommendation.  A bolt stress calculation with that preload said it would work, barely.  So, a new set of rods was ordered with larger 3/8 inch diameter bolts.  They arrived yesterday.  Carrillo and Arias are now part of the same company.  They did some calculations on the pistons and they should survive at 10,000 rpm, also. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3593 on: April 21, 2020, 10:56:22 PM »
The Triumph "frame" has four parts.  One is the engine-swingarm-rear wheel assembly.  The swingarm spindle goes through a bushing at the back of the engine so the engine and rear wheel act as one unit, alignmentwise.  The second piece is the main frame and it connects the steering head to the engine.  This connection is done by many fasteners and there is slop in each one.  It is pure luck if the engine-swingarm-rear wheel assembly is in correct alignment with the steering head after the bike is assembled.

The third part are the frame downtubes.  They go down from the steering head, under the engine, and they connect to the frame  behind the engine.  They add rigidity to the assembly.

The fourth part are the outriggers that connect the main frame to the ends of the swingarm spindle.  They add rigidity.

Aligning the wheels by cocking the rear wheel in the swingarm was shown in the last series of posts about the alignment jig.  This works as per making the bike go straight.  The sprockets are not in the same plane after the cocking is done.  This makes chains wear out early and creates power-robbing friction in the chain drive.  The following procedure aligns the wheels and keeps the sprockets in line.

First, the axle is adjusted in its slot using the screw adjusters so the axle and swingarm spindle are parallel.  Care needs to be used to assure this is done correctly.  It is a critical step.  My method is to measure the distances between the axle and swingarm pivot bolt centers on each side.  The axle nut is tightened down after this is done.  It will stay tight during the entire alignment process.  Note that the wheel is not cocked in the swingarm.

The workbench is leveled and the alignment jig is loosely assembled around the bike.  The picture shows the front wheel in the jig.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3594 on: April 24, 2020, 10:33:55 PM »
This next photo shows the rear wheel with the bars fit loosely against it.  The C-clamp will be used at a later step to tighten the bars against the wheel.  The horn mount bolt is at the center of the frame just behind the steering head.  It is used to hang the plumb bob.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3595 on: April 24, 2020, 10:39:36 PM »
The bob hangs down between the rails.  The bike is held by four tie downs, one on each corner, during all of this.  Now the bolts holding the frame together are loosened.  The picture shows the brace in front of the engine.  This is typical of the items that should not be fastened tight.     

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3596 on: April 24, 2020, 10:49:28 PM »
This picture shows typical bolts to be loosened.  The two lower bolts hold the lower frame rails to the main frame.  The big bolt at the top is an engine mounting bolt, and the other two in the middle retain a triangular brace.

The second picture shows an outrigger.  The big bolt is the swingarm pivot bolt and most of the slop in the system is there.  It definitely needs to be loose along with all bolts on the outrigger.  All engine mounts and the stay on top of the engine need to be loose and are not shown.  Also, the clamps holding the headers to the head should be loose.

 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3597 on: April 24, 2020, 10:57:59 PM »
Now the rails are snugged up against the tires and they are clamped to the bench.  There are four horizontal plates with slotted holes connecting the jig frame rails.  They are tightened down onto the rais, too.

The tie downs at the back of the bike are removed.  The front tie downs connect the handlebars to the sides of the work bench.  They are adjusted as needed so the plumb bob is centered between the rails.

A bottle jack is placed under the engine and the motor is raised just enough the take the tension off of the engine mounting bolts.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3598 on: April 24, 2020, 11:20:16 PM »
This photo shows how measuring is done to make sure the bob hangs down midway between the rails.  A level is put against the rear brake disk to make sure it is plumb.  The back wheel was not plumb on this example and it was pulled into plumb by pushing on the top of the wheel.

At this stage the wheels should be clamped between the rails.  This puts them in proper alignment.  The plumb bob is midway between the rails.  This makes sure the steering head is in alignment.  The back wheel is plumb.  Also, the chain adjusters are set so the rear axle is parallel to the swingarm pivot bolt.  This was one of the initial steps.

Now everything is aligned to be where it should be.  The swingarm pivot bolt and outrigger bolts are tightened first in the order and to the torque specified in the manual.  Next the frame and engine mounting bolts are tightened as per the shop manual.  The alignment is done.

This is my street bike and it has not been taken apart.  It was out of alignment with the back wheel cocked to one side.  It most likely came from the factory like that.  It is typical of the Triumphs that have been aligned and it handles better now.  Making and using these rails is something I recommend for all land speed bike racers.  The procedures will be different than for the Bonneville but the results will be the same, an aligned chassis. 
           

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3599 on: April 25, 2020, 11:24:30 AM »
Selling surplus bike parts on E-bay is an ongoing task.  This is a piston that has been sitting in a box on a shelf for 11 years.  I was taking pictures of it for the auction and I saw this on the skirt.  A crack running from 5 to 11 o'clock and another smaller crack going out from it to the right.  Has anyone seen this distress on a new and unused piston?