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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 1014412 times)

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3525 on: February 10, 2020, 09:27:12 PM »
The cush drive is narrowed 0.400 inches to move the wheel centerline closer to the swingarm centerline.  The sprocket carrier vanes are cut down 0.400 inches on the lathe.  A new spacer was made to go inside the Tiger sprocket carrier bearing so it will fit over the Bonnie axle.

The wheel is to big for the lathe.  The vanes are cut down 0.400 inches using burrs held in an electric drill.  This job took 2.5 days and it drove me to drink several times.  Note the reinforcing band on the hub. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3526 on: February 10, 2020, 09:39:28 PM »
The shorter spacer in the first foto is one I made for the standard Bonnie wheel on the brake side.  The longer spacer is a new one for adapting the Tiger wheel to the Bonnie.  Both are structural titanium

The second foto shows the wheel hub bearing spacers.  The rusty one is a standard Bonnie spacer.  The new one has Tiger dimensions except for the smaller inner diameter.  Annealed 304 stainless was used for the new spacer.

The newer Triumph rear wheels have two bearings per wheel and an extra bearing for the sprocket carrier.  This is a good and stronger design compared to many rear hubs that have only two wheel bearings. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3527 on: February 10, 2020, 09:53:45 PM »
This is the chain side wheel spacer.  The longer aluminum spacer is standard issue Bonneville.  The new titanium spacer is 0.055 inches shorter to move the wheel centerline closer to the swingarm centerline.

These are the Tiger cush drive rubbers on the trimmed sprocket carrier.  Normally the vanes are as tall as the rubbers.  This shows how much depth was removed from the cush drive.  The cush drive narrowing and the wheel spacer shortening moved the wheel 0.455 inches toward the swingarm centerline.  Now it is 1/16 of an inch away from the center.  It is close enough.  I did not want to remove any more depth from the cush drive.  A design compromise is what engineers call this little imperfection.       

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3528 on: February 10, 2020, 09:57:44 PM »
Both new wheels are in the wheel alignment jig.  Precise measurements are made to make sure the rear axle and swingarm spindle are parallel.  A straightedge is clamped against the countershaft sprocket.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3529 on: February 10, 2020, 10:07:07 PM »
The straight edge goes alongside the sprocket carrier.  The gap is exactly the width of a new sprocket.  Primo.  What a good and lucky day it is.  A new sprocket can be simply bolted on.  It is time to go to the pub and celebrate.

Here is a useful link.http://www.hagon-shocks.co.uk/common/pdf/wheels2011.pdf

The chart in this catalog shows the preferred rim sizes for different tires.  The original Bonneville rim was an "alternative rim" on the narrow side.  Now the rim will be the ideal size.  The Tiger rim is one size wider than the Bonnie rim. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3530 on: February 13, 2020, 12:04:31 AM »
This is a custom made sprocket for the Tiger 800 hub.  The order was received at the factory at 1:36 PM on Monday of this week.  It is Wednesday and the chainwheel arrived in this morning's mail.  The price was $77.10 including shipping.  That is some fast service, for sure.  The Tiger 800 and the Bonneville have a 525 width chain and this sprocket is cut for a narrower and lighter 520 width.  This should reduce friction and increase power to the rear wheel.  It is a common thing to do for race bikes.  This 44 tooth sprocket is for the last race of my career at RAF Elvington in the UK.   

 

     

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3531 on: February 13, 2020, 11:29:21 PM »
This is the countershaft sprocket for the 520 chain conversion.  A company called "Sprocket Center" has these things and it was ordered through the i-net.  "Use the largest countershaft sprocket possible" was something I learned years ago while building desert race bikes.  The chain is bent at less of an angle when it goes around the bigger sprocket and the load is shared among more teeth.  This lengthens chain life.  This 19 tooth one is the biggest that will fit.  Of course, the back sprocket has to be bigger, too, to get the correct drive ratio.  Pages 90 and 91 of the attached gie some useful info.  https://www.diamondchain.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/TechnicalEngineering.pdf 

Offline RidgeRunner

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3532 on: February 14, 2020, 06:49:51 AM »
     A big thanks for posting that link! 

     I've been messing with chain drives on and off for more years than I care to remember and thought I had learned and knew a lot about them.  After a quick scan I learned how much more there is for me to learn and have saved the pdf for further study and reference.

           Ed

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3533 on: February 14, 2020, 12:11:12 PM »
It is nice that that info is a help.  There are a few on-line chain drive design calculators.  No answers from them when the sprocket rpm and torque are entered.  It seems land speed demands are "off the chart" for these industrial based design aids.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3534 on: February 23, 2020, 01:16:12 AM »
The Wilder vs Fury fight was on the screen at one of the locals this evening.  The gypsy was the crowd favorite based on the cheering volume...     

Wheel swaps almost always require adapter rings for the brakes and sprocket.  This ring moves the rear brake disk 0.653 inches outward.  The foto shows the outward face of the ring and a rear brake disk.

In the old days Triumph would make minor changes to parts and it was easy to use the wrong combinations of bits to build a bike with poor results.  Times do not change.  These are different bolts to hold the Bonneville brake disk on.  The shoulders under the heads are of different lengths.  Use the shoulder length that holds the disk fixed onto the wheel with no free play if that is desired, or the other way if a floating disk is what you want.  Problems occur if both fixed and floating bolts are used on the same disk.

 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3535 on: February 23, 2020, 01:20:15 AM »
This is the side of the adapter that faces the wheel.  The raised outer flange supports the sheet metal disk that covers the wheel spokes.  The other picture shows the adapter ring in situ on the wheel.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3536 on: February 27, 2020, 06:21:53 PM »
Six safety wired nuts are needed to retain the sprocket.  Six blind holes are drilled for the safety wire.  Then the big hole is drilled through the nut for the threads.  The little wire holes daylight into this big hole.  The small wire hole drill bit does not break when this method is used.  The safety wires cross through the nuts over the tops of the studs as shown.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3537 on: February 27, 2020, 06:49:16 PM »
All of my stainless steel bar stock is some type of austenitic alloy.  Parts with cut threads in this metal have a tendency to gall and friction weld to other stainless steel fasteners.  Structural titanium fasteners have the same issue when they are used with others made from the same alloy.   The combination of structural titanium and austenitic fasteners does not have this problem.  The big engine mount bolts are titanium with stainless steel nuts, as an example.

The studs in the hub are stainless steel so the nuts are made from structural titanium.  This eliminates the potential for galling.  Ti is a very noble metal on the galvanic scale and stainless steels are less so.  Wicking grade Type 290 loctite, the green stuff, is applied to the threads after the bolts are tightened.  It coats the fastener threads and it prevents galvanic corrosion between the dissimilar metals.         

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3538 on: February 29, 2020, 12:00:55 AM »
This has been mentioned in some earlier posts.  Tonight I was able to get some better pictures so here it is again.  The three essentials for die cutting threads in structural titanium.  First, threading the stuff takes a lot of force and round bar slips in the chuck.  The hex is cut first so a wrench can be used to turn the bolt while the threads are cut.  Second, cutting lube is essential.  There are all sorts of proprietary cutting fluids in this shop made for ti and other exotic metals.  None work for this.  Basic anti-sieze is the only lube that works for threading, in my experience.  Last, the uncut tops of the threads are barely visible on the threaded shaft.  It takes some trial and error to figger out the right diameter.  The shaft dia is 0.300 inches for this M8x1.25 bolt.  This is a bit smaller than it would be for other metals.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3539 on: February 29, 2020, 12:01:46 AM »
The threads...