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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 1040005 times)

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3510 on: January 25, 2020, 12:37:01 AM »
The safety wire holes are drilled and the bolt is cut off using the parting tool.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3511 on: January 25, 2020, 12:44:39 AM »
A lot of short bolts are cut in this project.  They are an alloy and size that I cannot get here with a reasonable cost and delivery time.  So, I made them.

Lets say a longer bolt is needed with the head where my finger is.  Flats and a flange would be milled in the rod just up from the threaded portion.  The flange would be support during the threading and a wrench would be put on the flats to keep the bolt from turning.  The flats and flange would be cut off when the bolt shank is turned. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3512 on: January 27, 2020, 12:56:42 AM »
This is where the brake disk bolts onto the wheel.  Five bolts with threads on their entire length were drilled for safety wire and ready to be installed.  Then I noticed that the threads were recessed in the wheel.  It seems these partially threaded bolts are more appropriate.  Five of these were drilled for wire.  The unthreaded part of the bolt goes through the disk and it fills the recess.  The unthreaded shank has more cross-sectional area than the threaded part.  This provides extra metal in the shear plane between the disk and the wheel and it makes a stronger connection.

The center of the bolt was drilled just deep enough to intersect the future safety wire holes.  Then the six wire holes were drilled in from each side of the hex.  A lot less drill bits are broken doing this as compared to drilling the wire holes through the entire bolt end.         

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3513 on: January 27, 2020, 01:09:49 AM »
This is the finished wheel on the street bike.  The new wheel will be used on the race bike without the disk.  It is three pounds 8 ounces lighter than the OEM Triumph spoked wheel with its steel rim.  It is 2 pounds eight ounces lighter than the OEM spoked wheel with an alloy rim that I have used for the last twelve years.

Tires with tubes on spoked rims deflate almost instantly when punctured.  The air can quickly go out of all of the spoke holes.  Tubeless tires on one-piece rims usually deflate at a much slower rate.  There are fewer places where air can escape.  These new wheels provide safety advantages as well as reducing weight. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3514 on: January 30, 2020, 10:55:36 PM »
It is time to work on the rear wheel.  The bike is making substantially more power than the 900cc Tiger that the wheel was designed for.  An aluminum ring will be made to reinforce the outside of the cushion damper assembly.  Previous experience with drag bikes says if there is a weak point in the drive system it might be here.

An aluminum strap is cut to length and welded to make a hoop. The ring is deliberately made a bit small to fit over the hub.  It will be enlarged to exactly the right size using the heat and beat method.

Soap is rubbed on the outside of the ring.  Heat is applied from the inside and the ring is heated until the soap is a chocolate brown color.  This anneals the ring so it will deform under the hammer.  The ring in the picture has not gotten hot enough to toast the soap to the darker color.  The annealed ring will make a dull sound when it is dropped onto the anvil and it has little strength.
     

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3515 on: January 30, 2020, 11:03:44 PM »
The annealed ring is placed on a drain pipe and beat all along its periphery.  This stretches the metal to increase the ring's diameter.  It also work hardens the metal and makes it stronger and stiffer.  It took four heat and beat cycles to make the ring just the right size.   This is slightly smaller than the hub.  The work hardened ring makes a sharp pinging sound when dropped on the anvil.

The ring is heated on the stove.  It is not heated hot enough to anneal the work hardening.  This is important.  The ring in place on the wheel must not be in the weak annealed condition. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3516 on: January 30, 2020, 11:08:37 PM »
The ring should be sanded smooth on the inside before installation.  I got the pictures in the wrong order.  Here is the ring being heated and installed.  The installation needs to be fraction-of-a-second quick.  The objective is for the ring to cool and shrink onto the hub.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3517 on: January 30, 2020, 11:12:08 PM »
The ring is shrunk fit tightly against the hub.  Nothing is perfect and there is a slight gap in places.  Loctite 290, the wickable green stuff, is used to fill the gap.  It also helps to lock the ring on extra tight.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3518 on: January 30, 2020, 11:35:16 PM »
We had three hour long lab sessions every day in machinist school.  A fellow only needed to attend an hour of that to pass the class.  The teacher and his assistant left at the end of that hour.  No supervision for the last two hours.  I was there all three hours and I made some spending money doing machining for hire and making race parts for my Honda 350.  One job was to cut down the diameter of a two-stroke crankshaft flywheel to the minimum needed to provide strength around the crank pin.  This was done on a lathe and the outside diameter was about a quarter inch away from the crankpin.

A titanium ring was made for each flywheel half.  The inside diameter was a few thou less than the outside diameter of the crank.  The ring was a bit wider than the flywheel and the outside diameter was slightly too large.  The flywheel half was frozen in the freezer in the reefer in the break room.  The ring was heated in the forge.  The hot ring was placed over the cold flywheel and both were set aside to reach room temperature.  The ring was solidly locked onto the flywheel.  It was machined to final dimensions.

Ti was used for the ring 'cause it expands less at elevated temperatures than steel.  It locks on tighter when the engine heats up to running temperature.  Also it is lighter than steel.  This helps performance.  The final diameter and width of the ring were bigger and wider than the flywheel steel it replaced.  This was done to reduce the crankcase volume.  A two stroke performance tuning trick.  The crank was for a Suzuki 500 Titan, as I remember.  This was in 1972 or 73 so my memory is a bit vague.   

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3519 on: January 31, 2020, 07:35:23 AM »
Sharp intake of breath moment then I realized the pup was not nosing a hot band being fitted - I was going to ask why the pup did not have a leather muzzle like your gloves to protect him from the heat.

More pictures of the dog please.  :cheers:
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3520 on: February 01, 2020, 12:08:46 AM »
She ran across the room and tried to take the mallet.  Her nose did not get burned.  Her name is Ruby and she is Rose's pup.  The older dog is Gypsy and she is mine.  They are distant cousins.

The post said I heated up a titanium ring in the shop forge.  I was an idiot.  Fortunately the ring did not get hot enough to ignite.  That would have made that story much more interesting.     

Online 4-barrel Mike

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3521 on: February 08, 2020, 12:16:29 PM »
Just returned from breakfast at McQueen's on River Road in Oak Grove.



Just sayin'.   :cheers:

Mike
Mike Kelly - PROUD owner of the V4F that powered the #1931 VGC to a 82.803 mph record in 2008!

Offline salt27

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3522 on: February 08, 2020, 12:58:47 PM »
Just returned from breakfast at McQueen's on River Road in Oak Grove.



Just sayin'.   :cheers:

Mike


Did you have "green eggs and ham"?    :-D

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3523 on: February 09, 2020, 10:36:32 PM »
That labrador pup will be the rider.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3524 on: February 10, 2020, 09:18:16 PM »
This is the rear wheel.  The Bonneville has a smaller diameter axle than the Tiger 800.  The Tiger bearing is replaced with a Bonneville bearing.  Both bearings have the same OD and width.  This is the brake side.

The other picture shows the bearing spacer and sprocket side bearing.  The front wheel bearing spacer was made from aluminum alloy 6061-T651 having a 31,200 psi tensile yield strength.  The rear axle is under more tension and it carries heavier loads.  Alloy 2024-T351 with a 47,000 psi tensile yield strength was used for this more highly stressed part.  This alloy has poor corrosion resistance so it would be OK for a protected internal piece like this spacer.  It would not be used for an external part.

The part is in compression so the tensile yield strength is not valid except for comparing metals.  Often this is the only data we have so it is frequently used.  The bearing yield strength is published for the 2020-T351.  This compressive yield is 64,000 psi.  It is much higher than the tensile yield.  It is a safe assumption to use tensile yield in compressed part design, but not the other way.