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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 1005467 times)

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #345 on: January 05, 2011, 09:15:53 PM »
Those are nice bikes.  The pointy one, in particular.  It gives me some ideas.  The last two photos look like Frank Kletchkus shots.

In "The Racing Motorcycle", Bradley says "Do not attempt to pull the seat section in too sharply.  If the air has managed to stay attached this far then it will surely separate at a steep contraction.  The seat should only approach a point if the riser's backside is small enough to allow the seat section to reduce slowly in the available length."

My Acura is too big.  A contraction from my bum to a sharp point in the available length would be to sudden and flow separation would occur.  The seat sides taper to the rear at no more than 10 degrees and the back end is truncated at a flat plate.  The 10 degrees is the maximum taper I figure that is allowed without separation.  This is not an ideal situation.  I make the best of it by minimizing the truncated end height.

There is a lot of power robbing turbulence caused by air passing around and under the lower part of the motorcycle.  The skirts are an attempt contain this turbulence and to release it in a sort of organized manner.  They are an attempt to reduce base drag.

One picture shows the tail right side up and it is upside down in the other.  Right now I am putting the skin on the top part of the tail.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #346 on: January 07, 2011, 12:06:33 AM »
LSR motorcycle crashes are shown on u-tube video and in still pictures.  These are painful to look at and there are lessons they teach us.  One is that we do not want to be dragged along with the bike.

The tail could be built as a shell with an open gap between it and the bike.  The gap is blocked with sheet on this build.  There are no places on the tail to catch my boots if the bike flips me off.

Genuine crashing experience has shown me that the projection of the sewed on sole on a welted boot can catch on the bike and trap my foot.  My preference is a weltless boot like the Triumph one shown.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #347 on: January 07, 2011, 10:14:02 PM »
The old tail was taken apart to build the new one.  The old one was redone once, already, before this.  Salt is sprayed up onto the tail bottom every year and lately I am not washing the bike until I get back to Oregon.  The salt is on the bike for several days.  A perfect corrosion test.  Body work aluminum is the only thing I looked at.

The outside is waxed with airplane wax a few weeks before I leave.  I like the aluminum body work to be nice and shiny.  The wax does not work well to prevent corrosion.  Lots of pitting and white powder on waxed areas.

The unwaxed areas, such as the inside, were coated with ACF-50 after I put the tail section together.  There was dark grey oxidized aluminum in between the plates in some areas but no pitting or fuzzies.  The ACF-50 is working well to prevent corrosion.

Keep in mind that I use a cold water soak and cold running water from a garden hose on these parts.  They never see hot water, a spray, or soap.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #348 on: January 09, 2011, 08:26:36 PM »
This thing is done, finally.  Today it was weighed with the number plates and seat pad.  It weighs 20 pounds, for the curious.  I do not know how that poundage compares with a similar tail made from another material.  The pictures give a rough idea of the size.

This year I planned to do a lot more to the bike and not much more will be done.  The build will be on hold for awhile.  There is a small window in a teen's life where they are mature enough to grasp complex skills and ideas, yet they have not reached the rebellious and independent stage.  My youngest daughter is there now and she wants a motorcycle.  We are going to get my old desert race bike running and during the process she will help me rebuild the engine, suspension, etc.  During all of this I will show her how to operate all of the shop tools and machinery.

She plans to paint the bike pink.  Egad.  I guess it will be hers when we are done.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #349 on: January 14, 2011, 12:30:35 AM »
A goal in the partial streamlining is to get the teardrop shape.  The widest part of the rear streamlining is at the seat pan just under my bum.  The widest part of the front streamlining is the fairing in front of the handlebar ends.  The handlebar ends are about ten inches higher than the seat pan.

Ideally, the widest front part of the front streamlining should be at the same height as the widest part of the rear.  This clubman bar will place the handlebar ends 3 or four inches lower than they are now.  I will rebuild the fairing so the widest section is lower, too.  This will make the front and rear wide sections closer to the same height, give the bike a more teardrop like shape, and help aero.  This bar is made by Biltwell, an American company.  It is very strong and well made.

This year's racing expenses are two rear sprockets, this handlebar, a new helmet, entry fees, and travel to the race and back.  All other costs are raw materials.  I did not plan this, but the concept of a partially streamlined special construction bike is working out well.  Before the recession/depression, when I had money, I bought the riding gear and did the expensive stuff, like alloy rims, the racing engine parts, carbs, etc.  Now, when I am low on dollars, I can do the big jobs that take a lot of time and do not cost much, like rebuilding the tin work, building an exhaust, fabricating an intake plenum, etc.  I figure I can stretch these low budget tasks out and it will be at least two and maybe three years before I buy anything that is costly.
 

Offline gearheadeh

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #350 on: January 14, 2011, 08:48:07 AM »

This year I planned to do a lot more to the bike and not much more will be done.  The build will be on hold for awhile. Sad to hear this! There is a small window in a teen's life where they are mature enough to grasp complex skills and ideas, yet they have not reached the rebellious and independent stage.  My youngest daughter is there now and she wants a motorcycle.  We are going to get my old desert race bike running and during the process she will help me rebuild the engine, suspension, etc.  During all of this I will show her how to operate all of the shop tools and machinery.

She plans to paint the bike pink.   Egad.  I guess it will be hers when we are done.

Why not post a build thread here for her? Call it something pink! :-D
40 is the old age of Youth, 50 is the young age of the Senior years.

Offline Geo

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #351 on: January 14, 2011, 10:34:25 AM »
You are the Man, in my book!  Taking the time to work with your children and delaying what you would really like to do.    :cheers:

I have learned a lot from your postings.  Keep them up!

The build diary on the pink bike is a great idea.

Geo  - the car guy  :-)

Offline octane

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #352 on: January 14, 2011, 12:09:06 PM »
Bo ! ..as always; it's a pleasure reading you posts.


You might want to show your daughter this:






...or, maybe not

.-)


.
"A designer knows he has achieved perfection
not when there is nothing left to add
but when there is nothing left to take away"

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Offline Seldom Seen Slim

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #353 on: January 14, 2011, 12:41:25 PM »
Unh, mmm, Lars - is this a sign that you're going off on a tangent?  Maybe a sign of your life style changing.  Let us know so we don't get the wrong idea.
Jon E. Wennerberg
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Offline octane

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #354 on: January 14, 2011, 02:46:51 PM »
Unh, mmm, Lars - is this a sign that you're going off on a tangent?  Maybe a sign of your life style changing.  Let us know so we don't get the wrong idea.
No, you haven't got the wrong idea.
I would never underestimate me female side.
As part of my life style change, I'm trying to get in contact with my inner knitter.

It's amazing how one can knit a motorcycle when on magic mushrooms.......yeah man.....er.....woman
"A designer knows he has achieved perfection
not when there is nothing left to add
but when there is nothing left to take away"

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #355 on: January 14, 2011, 08:16:18 PM »
We will make some posts.  The old bike is "Thrasher."  It was raced and ridden a lot for fourteen years.  It is well used.  Fixing it up real nice and reliable is to take off the gas cap, roll the bike away, and roll a new one under it, and screw the cap back on.  Its main purpose now is a learning tool.  She will put some flower stickers on it and learn to ride it when we are done.  I am saving a little bit of money and I will get her a better bike if she helps me to the end and is still interested.  Then I will ride Thrasher when we go out into the woods together.  My testosterone level is dropping with age.  I might, or might not, take off the flower stickers.

Offline Peter Jack

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #356 on: January 14, 2011, 08:34:23 PM »
Maybe it's just a little of the ol' hippie influence coming through. :-D :-D :-D

Pete

Offline Freud

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #357 on: January 15, 2011, 12:03:33 AM »
Peter, do u think there is any chance that the Old Hippy is trying to reform?

Do you think that next he will be using a CAD program and aluminum torch welding?

FREUD
Since '63

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #358 on: January 16, 2011, 12:13:04 PM »
Freud, you discovered my secret!  Yes, a long time ago I was a hippy.  That was in pteredactyl times.  I have a yard full of rocks, sticks, and old bones for tools.  No need to spend money on anything fancy.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #359 on: January 17, 2011, 10:54:05 PM »
Today it was cool and cloudy with breeze instead of wind.  A perfect day for putting on the clubman bar.  Club racers in England used their bikes for transportation and raced them on weekends.  It was easier for them to change from their street setup to racing configuration and back with this type of bar, rather than with clip ons.  Hence the name "clubman" for this bar.  The advantage of this bar is mainly psychological.  It is more natural to tuck down low when a person's hands are also low.  Installation was easy.  I cut 2.5 inches off each end to give the 24-inch overall width that I prefer.