Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 831233 times)

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3420 on: September 11, 2019, 11:20:33 PM »
This is the end shoe.  There are four of them with one on each corner.  They hold the tires in place and they are made from the same channel as the rails.  A chunk of the channel is cut away to make a shoe.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3421 on: September 11, 2019, 11:24:26 PM »
This is the top of an end shoe.  It has threaded holes to retain a brace.  The next foto is the bottom of the shoe.  It has 11 mm holes an inch apart.   These holes in combination with the 2-inch spaced holes in the rails allow the shoes to be placed at any inch interval on the rail.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3422 on: September 11, 2019, 11:30:12 PM »
Three 10 x 1.25 bolts hold the shoe to the rail.

This new puppy is an ANIMAL.  The dog grabs her water bowl, full of water, in her jaws and flings it up in the air.  So, the water bowl is bolted to a chunk of 2x12 plank.  She flips the bowl, water, and plank up in the air.  Finally, a piece of mainline railroad track is deployed to use gravity to attach the bowl the floor.  This works. 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3423 on: September 14, 2019, 12:25:14 AM »
This is the brace plate that is attached to the top of the end shoe.   There are braces on both pars of end shoes.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3424 on: September 16, 2019, 01:20:39 AM »
These are the inner shoes.  There are four of them.  The holes are drilled at one-inch soaking just like the end shoes.  The entire alignment fixture, except for the bolts, can be made from the 25-foot long channel.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3425 on: September 16, 2019, 01:34:32 AM »
The rear wheel is wider than the front on most motorcycles.  These plywood wheel shim plates are used.  The front wheel width plus the thickness of the two shim plates should be close to the same as the rear wheel width.  Offset alignment is done by using a thicker shim plate on one side of the front wheel.  The difference in the thickness of the two shim plates is equal to the offset.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3427 on: October 03, 2019, 02:46:58 PM »
An article about bias in decision making and its consequences.  This is something I will think about when deciding what to do when building and racing.https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20191001-the-bias-behind-the-worlds-greatest-catastrophes

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3428 on: October 09, 2019, 11:24:47 PM »
Cast aluminum wheels from the chain drive version of the Triumph Tiger 800 use the same size tires as the spoked wheels my Bonnie.  A used pair with small dents in the rims were given to me.  They were sent to a repair shop in Ohio that specializes in wheel repair.  They will be fixed up as good as new for about $1,000 including shipping.  This includes the replacement of the 90 degree angled OEM valve stems with straight no-angle racing grade valve stems.  Costwise, fixing up these used wheels saves a few hundred dollars as opposed to buying new ones.

A sprocket carrier is the thing that the rear chainwheel bolts onto.  It connects into the rubber cushions in the rear wheel.  Neither the sprocket, its carrier, or the cush drive rubbers came with the wheel.  A new one needs to be ordered from Triumph.  The wheels are from a 2014 Tiger 800 and the carrier costs $490.34 for that model.  The same carrier in a slightly different color is used on the 2018 models.  It costs $290.58 from Triumph.  The later model one was ordered.  It is black rather than the dark silver of the 2014 model.  This is no big deal.  It will work fine.

It pays to check the prices for parts shared by different years and models of bikes, I learned.  The prices vary.     

Online Lemming Motors

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3429 on: October 10, 2019, 07:21:27 AM »
You made my day.

I was flicking through the detail and pics and got to the dog bowl and lmao.  :-D

Thanks for the article on Outcome Bias too - probably why we take risks - we are programmed to consider the outcome; that woolly mammoth is going down and I have some Stilton sauce in the back of the cave that will go nicely with a back steak, rather than the risk; Dodge that woolly mammoth has big tusks - that is going to hurt in the morning.

John
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3430 on: Today at 12:06:20 AM »
Rational thinking is something I am not familiar with.  The thought of sizzling mammoth with stilton sauce would be enough motivation to make me take any risk in the past.  The American Eagle and Carbliner incidents have a lot to do with a change in attitude.  Us bike guys have zero roll cage, just like Ms Coombs.  Rob Freyvogel was a lot smarter than me and he got into trouble.  It is time for me to engage the frontal lobes in the decision making process.  The outcome bias article came along at the right time.

The outcome bias was discussed when I was in engineering skool about 35 yeas ago.  What I remember the professor saying is "When you roll the dice the chances of a double six are always the same regardless of what you rolled before."  That lesson I remembered.  I never really understood it or used it until now.

In the past with a loose and wet track the bike was run with reduced tire pressures.  This increased the tire footprint and it worked.  The results were reduced wheelspin with no apparent tire damage like delamination.  Now I need to reevaluate this strategy without biasing my thinking from past experience.  "What will be different now?" I ask myself.  Back then I was in the 120 to 130 mph range.  Now speeds between 150 and 160 are possible.  It make no sense now to base my decisions on what worked back then.   This is how I am trying to make decisions with out outcome bias.

In the past my philosophy was to run V rated tires for speeds under 150 and ZR rated tires for anything over that.  Now I am looking at the issue in more detail.  Tire calculations are attached.  A load rating chart is also attached.  This is originally from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation and I downloaded it from the Bike Bandit website.

These load ratings are based on tires inflated to the manufacturer's maximum recommended cold pressure.  Lower pressures result in lower ratings than those published.  In the future I will use the 42 psi maximum recommended cold pressure. 
       

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3431 on: Today at 12:18:52 AM »
This table is from an out-of-print handbook from the Japanese Automobile Tire Manufacturers Association.  It shows how load  capacity decreases with speeds over 150 mph.  An expert in the tire industry sent me this.  It shows the need to keep weight down to get good tire life at high speeds.  The other table is some kilometers per hour to miles per hour conversions.  This makes it easier to understand the JATMA chart.

Two things are obvious.  One is wheelspin needs to be controlled, in some cases, to keep tires together.  Second, adding ballast weight may be a bad idea.  Electronic traction control seems to be a much better solution.