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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 1014437 times)

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3405 on: August 24, 2019, 12:26:49 AM »
There are a lot of bolted connections holding the bike chassis together.  Each bolt hole is a little bit larger than the bolt that fits through it.  It is possible, and has happened, that the wheels are out of alignment when the chassis is assembled due to the cumulative slop in the many connections.  An assembly jig can be used to keep things in alignment.  The next posts show how one is made.

The start is a 25-foot long piece of 6-inch wide and 2.5-inch tall aluminum channel.  Two 8-foot, 6-inch long main rails are cut along with two 1-foot long sections.  The remaining channel is diced into 9-inch lengths.     

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3406 on: August 24, 2019, 12:30:23 AM »
A chop saw helps a lot.  These are the cut-up channel parts before machining.  The little bike is used for illustration.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3407 on: August 24, 2019, 12:32:00 AM »
Close-ups of the cut parts at the front and back.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3408 on: August 29, 2019, 10:29:31 AM »
The nights are warm and I take advantage of that to work in the sheds with the doors open for good ventilation.  There are many dubious characters wandering around here and local shootings so personal safety is a concern.  "Gypsy" is a ten month old black labrador.  Her first day here was yesterday.  She keeps a good watch over me and I am much safer.  It was hard to get a decent picture of her.  She does not stand still.

Offline manta22

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3409 on: August 29, 2019, 10:32:10 AM »
That looks like a nice dog, WW.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ

Offline ggl205

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3410 on: August 29, 2019, 10:41:40 AM »
Strap some ordinance on her in case you need it, WW.

John

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3411 on: August 30, 2019, 12:24:55 AM »
She is bred and partially trained to be a national champion field trial dog.  The fellow that owned her is 81 and he had to downsize his commitments so he sold her.  All she knew was a concrete floored kennel with chain link walls.  She is learning how to swim, walk up and down stairs, chase squirrels, sit outside the pub, and other basic dog skills since we got her.  She will be a full size old school labrador, which is a big and burly dog. 

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3412 on: August 30, 2019, 06:28:20 AM »
Shame she can't visit the UK - she could learn to sit inside the pub.
All of our local establishments have dog biscuits at the bar. My fave are the bone shaped ones made with oats and cheese at the Yew Tree - they go really nicely with a pint of IPA, Nonu our labradoodle likes those biscuits too.

Rebellion is a local brewery - snapped this recently outside a pub - most civilized.
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3413 on: September 02, 2019, 12:57:31 AM »
The barmaids at our local are taking a liking to her.  They bring her a bowl of water and some treats.  She gets faster and better service than we do.  She is adjusting well to the shop.

The frame and wheel alignment jig is finished.  It is something I designed in my head and built from my imagination.  I was too lazy to use pencil and paper or computer aided design.  It has not been used.  One of my friends wants to check his bike for straightness on Wednesday.  Some pictures will be posted.

     

Offline Stainless1

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3414 on: September 02, 2019, 08:45:41 AM »
Don't be surprised if the front and rear centerlines are .060 or so out from each other...
 :cheers:

I thought all the breweries up there were Gypsy friendly...  :cheers:
Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.

Offline Koncretekid

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3415 on: September 02, 2019, 10:39:47 AM »
Don't be surprised if the front and rear centerlines are .060 or so out from each other...
 :cheers:

I believe the flat track boys used to intentionally offset the rear wheel to make the bikes turn left, and I was thinking about trying that just before I quit roadracing, depending on whether the track was clockwise or anti-clockwise, but never got to do so (the BSA B50 didn't seem to like left hand turns, although it was probably just me)

I wonder if it would help to do so to counter a steady crosswind?

Tom
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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3416 on: September 06, 2019, 12:53:42 AM »
Anyone is welcome in the pubs here is they have had a recent bath, are over 21, and they pay for their beer.  Gypsy just got spayed and she is stumbling around the house with a cone on her head.  An Elizabethan Collar is what the vet calls it.

Offset will be addressed in a forthcoming post.  This tool will work when aligning an offset bike if the offset and its direction are known.

The tool is made for the bikes my friends and I ride.  None are over 1000cc and all are normal bikes.  No choppers.  The longest one is my Triumph Bonneville with a 3-inch swingarm extension.  It has a 62 inch wheelbase.  Two 102 inch by 6 inch by 2.5 inch aluminum channels are long enough for the rails.  One flange of each is not drilled.  The other flanges are, with 20 holes per channel end, for 120 holes, total. The hole row starts one inch from the end and is 1 inch inside of the outer flange edge as shown in the foto.  The holes are 2 inches apart and are the pilot drill size for a 10 x 1.25 bolt hole.  THis is a 11/32 inch drill.       

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3417 on: September 06, 2019, 12:59:37 AM »
A drill press makes the tapping quicker and in better alignment.  A spiral tap is shown.  The drill press motor power can be used to screw the spiral tap into the part.  There is no need to demean yourself by use of hand labor to turn the tap.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3418 on: September 06, 2019, 01:01:27 AM »
Cutting oil is essential to get good quality threads.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3419 on: September 09, 2019, 12:44:19 AM »
These are the end plates.  One is on each end and they hold the rails in alignment.  The widest tire any of us use is 150 mm.  A 7-inch spacing between the rails will accommodate this size tire.  The most accurate alignment is done with the rims between the rails without tires.  A 2-inch minimum width within the rails will work for this.  The end plates shown provide this 2 to 7 inch spacing.

There are several ways to use the alignment jig.  One is to clamp the wheels in place in correct alignment with the chassis loosely bolted together.  Then, the chassis bolts are tightened.  It takes considerable downward clamping force from the end plates onto the rails to make sure the rails do not spread apart during the bolt tightening process.  Experience has shown that the six bolts per plate provide enough clamping force.