Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 782493 times)

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3345 on: March 06, 2019, 12:12:24 AM »
These beads were laid on both sides of each flange.  They shrank them and straightened the rail out.  There were craters at the end of each bead where they ended.  The sooty welds are where I went back after the flange cooled and tried to fill the craters with more weld metal.  The beads were ground flat and some holes showed that I did not completely fill the craters.  They are quite deep.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3346 on: March 06, 2019, 12:13:40 AM »
This is another crater.  What causes this?  How is it prevented?

Online Stainless1

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3347 on: March 06, 2019, 08:11:22 AM »
If you were using TIG at the end of a weld I would back off the pedal a little and add filler...
MIG... did you stop moving and let it fill... were you pushing or pulling... did you pull the torch back at the end of the weld losing the gas envelope

Disclaimer... I am not a Weldor.... but I weld a little....  :cheers:
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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3348 on: March 06, 2019, 09:46:49 AM »
It seems that the temperature in the metal affects penetration with deeper penetration in hotter aluminum.  The weld blew through the aluminum at the end of the joint so I made a tack at the end before the weld to act as a backstop.  The bead ended at the tack rather than at the edge of the part.  This kept the weld from blowing a notch through the metal.  It seems the heat from welding makes the metal hot and terminating the weld tricky.  A push weld works best.  There are bubbles in the bead when a pull weld is made.  I did not pause at the end of the weld.  I will try that method this this morning.  Thanks for the advice.  This is a big help.

Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3349 on: March 06, 2019, 10:22:56 AM »
Go with Bob.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3350 on: March 06, 2019, 12:18:33 PM »
A pause was tried at the end of the first weld using this method.  It just made a bigger crater than the welds done earlier this morning with no pause.  A longer pause was tried for the second weld.  It blew a hole through the metal.

Offline Peter Jack

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3351 on: March 06, 2019, 03:34:51 PM »
Bo, heat builds up in aluminum as you move toward the end of the weld. When you get close to the end of the weld take your finger off the trigger and pause in place for just a second. then give it a quick blast as you move forward with the puddle cooling. Repeat as required to get to the end of the weld. As long as you do this quickly enough the weld will be high quality and won't blow through. Adding heat to an area that's already fragile is just going to result in large holes and a lot of aluminum on the floor. A short rest followed by a short blast right into the center of the weld puddle will solve your problems.

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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3352 on: March 06, 2019, 11:54:41 PM »
Thanks Pete.  I will do what you suggest.

The center section was welded onto the cross braces.  It is 2 inch wide x 3/16 thick aluminum bar stock.  There are two pieces, one for each end, and the welding started at the middle and proceeded outward toward each end, one weld after another.

The inner line is the edge of the cross brace before any welding.  The outer line is the cross-brace edge just before the last weld is done.  The distance between the two is about a millimeter.  This shows how aluminum shrinks during welding.

The ramp was made in a similar way except the center bar was welded onto each end first.  The middle welds were done second.  This produced tension stress in the middle bar due to shrinkage and it contributed to warping the ramp.  The ramp middle is bowed upwards.

It is important to pay attention to weld sequence to prevent stresses from shrinkage.

The ramp was held down with blocks under the center and each end was unsupported and tied down.  The ramp was bowed under tension in the opposite way it would shrink due to the welding of the center piece.       

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3353 on: March 06, 2019, 11:58:11 PM »
This is a blurry picture of the rail on its side after welding on the center pieces.  It is straight.  Pre-tension and welding sequence helped to make this good thing happen.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3354 on: March 10, 2019, 11:45:31 PM »
Thanks for the advice on filling the crater when finishing the weld.  It solved the problem.

This is the ramp, rail, and wheel chock.  It is the old ramp widened out.  All aluminum work on the trailer is done.  It was very frustrating and it took a long time with lots of redo until things got to be OK.  A very educational project, for sure.  Now I will see how it holds up in service.     

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3355 on: March 10, 2019, 11:51:55 PM »
The next part is to restore and add braces to the frame.  There is a lot of saline related distress throughout.  Many trips out onto the flats have taken their toll.  Use stainless steel fasteners is one thing I learned when taking this thing apart.  Lots of bolts were rusted together and heat and force were needed.  All replacements will be brass or stainless depending on the stress loads.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3356 on: March 26, 2019, 11:32:23 PM »
The trailer was originally bought from K-Mart in 1986.  The bearings and spindles were typical for a 2000# axle.  Both had a 1-1/16 ID.  They were replaced a few times due to wear.  The axle was bent and very rusty.  So, a new axle was made with spindles and bearings for a 3,500# axle capacity.  The trailer capacity will stay at 2000# like it was before.  Hopefully these beefier bearings will last longer.  Unfortunately there seems to be no reputable name brand bearings made in the US available anymore.  All is red Chinese crap now.  This makes me upset but there seems to be no other choice.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3357 on: March 26, 2019, 11:50:21 PM »
A leaf spring broke a few years ago while the bike was being towed to Bonneville.  It was one of the original K-Mart 500# springs.  Some 750# springs were ordered on the internet and they arrived at the West Wendover KOA.  They were installed.  Both springs were made by different manufacturers.  One sacked out during the next few years and one did not.  The good spring had an identification tag on it.  It was sold by Rockwell American.  Two new 1000# springs were purchased from them to bring the spring capacity up to a ton.  American made springs could not be found.  These springs are imported.

The 500# springs I really liked.  They would flex and the suspension would bottom out often.  This gave a smooth ride.  This concept of soft springs may have worked OK with the coil springs I was familiar with.  Unfortunately leaf springs cannot flex as much and often as coil springs without fatigue failure issues.  Hopefully these 1000# capacity springs will not flex enough to fail prematurely and still provide a sorta smooth ride.

Offline Old Scrambler

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3358 on: March 27, 2019, 09:45:05 PM »
Shocks????
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Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #3359 on: March 29, 2019, 10:05:25 PM »
Maybe some shocks will go on the trailer.  There is a pair of good triumph rear shocks in the junk pile.

The old 2K hubs had four lugs.  The new 3.5 K hubs are made with five or six lugs and not four.  These are Dexter and are made in the USA.  New wheels were needed.  These are Dexstar ones made in the US.  They painted them gloss black in a custom order for me.  Their service was fast with a reasonable cost.

The old tires were Carlisle USA Trail 4.80 x 12 with a 990# load rating and a 62 mph speed rating.  Two delaminated on my big trip back east.  We typically do not use our car tires at the maximum recommended cold inflation pressure.  We use a bit less so the ride is smoother and the tire wear more is more evenly spread across the face.  This is what I was doing.  This caused the delams along with using the tires at higher speeds than rated according to the Carlisle tech guy.  He said to run the tires with the maximum recommended pressure and the tires are designed for this.

The tires and bearings are felt for heat when I stop for rest breaks.  The tires are pinched to check for delams.  The delaminations were noted early and in both cases and I was able to put on the spare before the distressed tire blew out.

The new tires are 5.30 x 12 Carlisle USA Trail with 1050# and 87 mph load and speed ratings.  They are made in America.