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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 713240 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3075 on: June 19, 2018, 10:59:10 PM »

Type "triple clamp offset" into Google and select "Images."  All sorts of diagrams appear and there is a little movie, too.  This explains offset and trail better than I can.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3076 on: June 25, 2018, 12:30:28 AM »

The new triple clamps are on the bike.  The zener diode clamps to the middle of the lower triple clamp below the headlight.  The headlight was moved back when the offset was changed and the diode had to be relocated.  The wiring is done and the smoke stayed inside the wires when the key was turned on.  This is a miracle when my electrical skills are considered.  Rubbing the Volta statue was a good idea.

There is some idiotic federal requirement that motorcycle lights turn on when the ignition is turned on.  The poor battery has to deal with the wattage of the lights, ignition, and starter motor at the same time.  The previous version of the wiring had a UK light switch I got in London.  That allowed me to turn off the lights when starting the engine.  The new wiring harness is changed so that fix cannot be done.  Another problem to figure out.  Maybe some low wattage LED headlight and taillight bulbs will be enough.

Progress is being made.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3077 on: July 08, 2018, 05:29:30 PM »

Today the bike was rum through the usual test loop in the Cascade foothills.  The break in oil was in the engine and only the outer valve springs.

The new triple clamps with less offset do not hurt straight line stability.  They make the front wheel feel more "planted" on the pavement.  The steering felt a bit vague and light with the old clamps.

The new cam timing does not produce noticeable reversion effects at street rpm (under 4,000).  This is very nice considering the cam lift and duration.  Credit the computer based wave action design for this.  The PC did the hard thinking.

The lack of counterbalancers with the 270-450 crank does not make the the bike vibrate enough to be unpleasant on the street.  The blur on images in the mirror shows that all of the vibration is sideways and not up to down.  Intensity is between an old Meridan Bonneville and a Norton Atlas.

Long term plans are to race again in Straightliner events.  The bike would be used for transportation while in the UK and I want to ride through Cheddar Gorge, the Lake District, the Peak District, across the Pennines, and up to Edinburgh.  The bike has enough street manners to do this.  This was something I was worried about.           


* 2018 Build 082.JPG (433.03 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 57 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3078 on: July 09, 2018, 08:46:45 PM »

The clutch slipped during the 2017 meet and that might have cost me a record.  There was plenty of power in the engine to go fast enough.  The oil I was using for both break in and racing was a car oil with friction modifiers.  They did not have JASO MA-2 certifications and that is what is needed for an engine with a wet clutch.  Also, I was told that clutch plates contaminated with friction modifiers might be permanently affected.

My preference and experience says to use a break in oil with a good zinc-phosphorous package.  I cannot find any with a MA-2 rating.  What I did was to use the old contaminated clutch initially with the non MA-2 rated break in oil.  That was used for the break in loop through the mountains.  Then the engine and filter were drained and a MA-2 rated mineral oil was put in.  A loop was made down to the local for Sunday steak dinner and a few pints.  That flushing oil was drained and a new filter with the MA-2 rated race oil will be installed tonight, along with a new clutch pack.  What a pita this is.  I am not taking any chances this year.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3079 on: July 14, 2018, 12:35:40 AM »

The head was pulled off and the inner springs and shims were put in place.  The clutch was replaced with a new one and synthetic race oil is in the engine.  The pump gas was drained and replaced with race gas.  Lots of mickey mouse little problems were fixed.  The trailer is serviced and ready to go.  Everything is prepared for tomorrow's dyno appointment.  Except the flippin' truck.  Rose borrowed it for something and it is not here.  It is always something...
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4-barrel Mike
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« Reply #3080 on: July 14, 2018, 12:50:37 AM »

-> Willamette Valley Yellow Cab -> U-Haul -> F-150 -> home to get the trailer -> dyno session  cheers

Mike
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Mike Kelly - PROUD owner of the V4F that powered the #1931 VGC to a 82.803 mph record in 2008!
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3081 on: July 15, 2018, 09:39:29 AM »

Rose brought the truck back late at night.  She told me what she was going to do and when she would be back before she left and I did not listen to her.

The dyno session went OK.  It was with a new tuner in Beaverton on a Dynojet rear wheel dyno.  This is similar to the setup we used for the last 12 years.  Just like the last setup, the exhaust went out of the bike into the dyno booth air before it was sucked out of the room and blown into the neighborhood.  This was one reason why I stopped using leaded gas and it looks like I will continue to use unleaded in the future.

The late model OEM headers have a large diameter and a cross-over pipe under the engine in the correct place to reflect the third harmonic.  They were wrapped with insulating tape and two Predator glass-pak style slip ons were installed.  That was the first setup.
The 2 into 1 header and collector I designed and built was the second setup.

Both systems have similar power and torque and the jetting used for one can be used for the other.  The predators made a couple of more horsepower in the midrange and lost a couple on top end compared to my system.  The predators are the best choice for runway racing and my pipes for land speed.  The predators are much quieter.  They might be the best choice for the Yorkshire mile in the UK.       
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3082 on: July 16, 2018, 10:40:18 AM »

The previous dyno curves are shown.  The cluster of curves are 2017 pulls with different jetting.  The blue 2014 curve is printed and the 2016 curve is drawn in pencil.

The 2017 curves show a big drop in torque at 6,000 rpm.  It could not be smoothed out by jet changes.  It is suspected to be reversion.  The peak torque in 2014 was 72 pounds-feet.  It was substantially greater than the peak torque of 69 pounds-feet in 2017.  Two projects for last winter were getting rid of the midrange dip and restoring the lost torque.  Also, the 2017 horsepower peaks past redline.  It was desired that the peak be pushed back to just before redline.

The latest dyno curves are shown, too.  The only difference between 2017 and 2018 is a lobe center timing shift and going from a 360-360 firing order to a 270-450 degree sequence.

The two peaks are smoothed out and the torque curve is much flatter.  This was done using the computer model.  The lobe center angles are the widest that gave decent virtual power in the model.  The intent was to reduce the overlap window and the reversion.  It worked.

The peak torque dropped a bit compared to 2017.  It is normal for the peak torque to drop when the torque curve is smoothed out in my experience with other engines when cam timing shifts are the only change.  No worries about this.

The 2014 engine made the most torque.  It was one of my best efforts in this respect and it gave a personal best speed of 146 mph.  It fell flat on top end and that is the reason for further development in 2017 and 2018.

The power peak was moved back where I wanted it by advancing the cams.

This is the end of engine development.  The motor is as good as I can get.  Now it is the time to do something with it.


* older dyno curves.jpg (227.31 KB, 791x1024 - viewed 76 times.)

* July 2018 dyno curves.jpg (185.96 KB, 994x768 - viewed 61 times.)
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RansomT
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« Reply #3083 on: July 17, 2018, 06:37:12 AM »

Just out of curiosity. Did you use the same rear tire (brand and model) on all pulls?
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3084 on: July 17, 2018, 02:18:49 PM »

Yes.  They are two different dynos and operators. 
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3085 on: July 18, 2018, 12:19:25 AM »

That post with the dyno curves is incorrect.  I reviewed my notes.  The 2107 cam timing used lobe center angles of 112 intake and 111 exhaust having a 35 degree overlap at 0050 lift.

The 2018 cam timing used 106 intake and 116 exhaust with 36 degrees overlap.  The intake cam was advance 6 degrees and the exhaust was advanced 5 degrees.

Most racers wind these engines up to 10,000 rpm or more and the 2017 cam timing was optimal for that.  They blow them apart occasionally, too.  I cannot afford to take big chances on my tiny budget.  The redline is at 9,000 rpm which is relatively safe.  My cam timing goal was to bring the power peak down to 8,700 rpm, so the cams were advanced. 
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3086 on: August 06, 2018, 09:58:46 AM »

This will be a "data collecting" year at the BMST.  There is not enough power to get a record. There was a second engine that was virtually designed last winter.  It is the same as the one to be used this year with one exception.  The cams are set at maximum overlap with the their lobe center angled governed by clearances between the valve heads and piston crowns.  This was the way many Triumphs were set up decades ago.  The computer model shows it having substantially more power and torque than the current engine.

This clearances engine has two issues.  First, it is a 10,000 rpm motor.  This winter I need to take apart the engine and check the rod big end bearings and crankcase bolt tightness to see if the problems are solved in these aspects.  Then the ignition module rev limit can be raised another 1000 rpm if everything is OK. 

The second issue is intake/exhaust tuning for big overlap.  These engines are very sensitive to this in my experience and there is no certain way to figure out what works except trial and error.  This takes a lot of time and I do not have it this year.  The conservative cam timing I am using is best for now.

The virtual model of the clearances motor shows that if that motor functions as the tables and graphs show, more power is needed for a record and I see no way to get it.  Aerodynamics is the only other option.  A two hour test is scheduled at the A2 wind tunnel in North Carolina on the 18th of September.  The prep for this long trip involves upgrades to the trailer and lots of servicing and repair for the truck.  Progress is made in these areas.

The FIM rules changed and a lot of sheet metal mayhem is needed to comply and to take advantage of the newer permitted shape.  This is major work.  This build is not dormant.  Right now I am too stressed out and thrashed to make frequent posts about the project.   

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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3087 on: August 07, 2018, 06:53:58 PM »

The engine made 87.3 rear wheel HP on the dyno in 2014 adjusted to SAE standard environment.  The timeslip climatic data is available for the 146 mph run at 2014 BMST.  The "on the salt" horsepower is 73.2 using an SAE correction based on timeslip data.  Overcoming friction drag used 17.8 HP.  The remaining 55.4 HP went to overcoming aero drag.  The aero drag equation was used with the air density, frontal area, and velocity to back calculate the aero drag coefficient.  It was 0.427

The aero drag is calculated for typical salt flat climate using this drag coefficient at 5 MPH increments between 145 and 175 mph.  Friction drag is calculated for the same speeds.  Both are combined to make a total drag vs speed curve for 145 to 175 MPH.

The new engine is expected to make 87.8 HP on the salt using a SAE correction based on typical Bonneville climatic data.  This gives 155 MPH based on the 0.427 aero drag coefficient.  A 170 mph average speed is needed to break the record.

The gearing will use a 19 tooth front and 42 tooth rear sprocket.  This gives 8,570 rpm at 155 MPH with no wheel slip.  It provides 8,740 RPM with 2 percent wheel slip.  This is right at peak power and below the rev limiter at 8,900 rpm.  It should give a solid 155 MPH.

The bike might work better than expected and "shoot ducks" through the measured mile when it hits the limiter.  In this case another run will be made with a 40-tooth rear sprocket.

"Target 155" is this year's goal.
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« Reply #3088 on: August 07, 2018, 09:06:22 PM »

+1 on the 40 rear sprocket.  Sometimes, an ever so slight over gear is good for a couple mph.

I notice no calculation on tire growth...
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #3089 on: August 07, 2018, 10:58:50 PM »

It is a steel belted radial.  Do they grow?
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