Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 801715 times)

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Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2340 on: March 02, 2016, 08:16:25 AM »
Good one John.
 :cheers: No hijack intended Bo but it took me 40 years to find out
the Japanese use a different pattern. 

Offline manta22

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2341 on: March 02, 2016, 12:36:33 PM »
Interesting- I didn't know that the Japanese standard was not a Philips head. It looks more like a Reed & Prince to me.

Other self-centering designs are found in aerospace stuff: Tridair developed a tri-wing design and someone else developed a four-wing design. Both types grip the fastener tightly when being driven.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ

Offline Ron Gibson

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2342 on: March 02, 2016, 12:54:13 PM »
I'm with Neil on that but don't forget the pozi drive, just to confuse things. :-D :-D


Ron
Life is an abrasive. Whether you get ground away or polished to a shine depends on what you are made of.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2343 on: March 02, 2016, 07:41:24 PM »
Most of us who worked on bikes in the 60's and 70's had one of these.

Offline Speed Limit 1000

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2344 on: March 02, 2016, 08:10:17 PM »
I have one like that and a smaller one. They work great. My Blue Point 3/8 impact also works wonders :-D
John Gowetski, red hat @ 221.183 MPH MSA Lakester, Bockscar #1000 60 ci normally aspirated w/N20

Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2345 on: March 02, 2016, 09:31:14 PM »
Bo, you just reminded me.

Someone borrowed my impact driver and I can't remember who. :evil:

These days I don't use one but that was the only way to get the screws out
after I'd butchered them. :-D

Offline aussievetteracer

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2346 on: March 03, 2016, 04:51:06 AM »
Mate- we even have them in Oz. And even tho' I'm not really into bikes (but I still hold an open bike licence) they work well on race cars.
Denis
Denis

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2347 on: March 04, 2016, 09:43:24 PM »
My son, Josef, sent me this movie.  It does a good job of explaining the old grindomesh gear cluster vs a newer synchromesh.  All of this is new learning for me.  Bikes use constant mesh gearboxes and there is no reverse gear.www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQWejyx0gi8

The movie also shows some eccentric gears. It is not often that a person can see them in action.   

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2348 on: March 06, 2016, 08:56:57 PM »
A good thing about being alive now is being able to rewind the film real easy.  There are a few things in that flick I had to look at three or four times to figure out.  Going back and looking at things a few times was hard to do in the old days.

The crank is out of the bike and I made a stand for measuring the rod bearing clearances.  The caps with lower shells are put in the notches on the stand.  The crank is put on over the caps and gently tightened down with ratchet straps.  This holds the caps and crank solidly on position when I bolt and unbolt the rods.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2349 on: March 06, 2016, 09:17:06 PM »
The card that comes with the plastigage shows the squashed plastic thicknesses to the nearest 0.0005 inches.  Sometimes the crushed plastic was halfway between these increments, so I report the clearances to the nearer 0.00025 inches.

The crank journals appeared to be two different sizes when I measured them a few weeks ago with the crank in the bike.  The journals measured out to be 0.0005 inches different dia.  I did not see this difference when I measured the clearances with plastigage.  So, I remeasured the journals with the micrometer.  They are real close to being the same size.

It seems that when measurements are needed to the nearest 0.0001 inches it is best to have the crank out of the engine and on the workbench so the mike is held the same way for all measurements.  I could not get this consistent feel with the crank in the bike and me holding the mike at weird angles.   




Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2350 on: March 06, 2016, 10:07:33 PM »
The chart posted a few weeks ago is reposted with a column in the middle showing the plastigage measurements.  They are mostly between the bore gage and tube micrometer methods.  I was looking for a way to check big end clearances with the crank in the bike.  Plastigage never worked for this 'cause I could not keel the rod from wiggling when the big end bolts were tightened and loosened.  The only practical method to determine the clearances is to take the engine apart and to use the plastigage.  This motor is making far more power than it was designed to produce so annual tear downs are a good idea.

Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2351 on: March 07, 2016, 03:27:10 AM »
Nice stand Bo.
You've given me an idea now!. :-D

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2352 on: March 08, 2016, 10:14:23 PM »
The crankcases split horizontally.  The ends are clamped together with sealer.  Most of the middle of the case including the surfaces around the main bearings are clamped down with bolts and have metal to metal contact.  I can see where the fretting occurred.  The oxidation is partially worn off and the higher parts of the mating surface are shiny.

Is there an oil resistant dye like Dykem that I can put on these surfaces upon reassembly?  It would be nice to see if I cured the fretting problem when I do the next teardown.  The dye would make this easy to see, I figure.

Gretchen sends lots of pictures of Tasmania to Rose and she shows them to me.  That sure is an interesting place.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2353 on: March 11, 2016, 08:09:35 PM »
The Triumph has wide pistons.  This means the flame front has a long distance to travel.  The rods are short in comparison to the stroke.  This causes the piston to quickly move away from TDC.  A fast burning gasoline is needed to make the flame front move the needed distance in the very short time that is available.  This is something I knew about and I run a flashy and light specific gravity leaded gasoline.  It works very well.  The combustion peak pressure is likely to occur in the desired 14 to 18 degree ATDC range.

The jungle juice is mainly this gasoline with some other goodies.  One is a highly volatile compound containing nitrogen, hydrogen, and some oxygen.  My suspicion is this is flashing off early and peak pressure is happening before 14 degrees.  This puts large stresses on the engine like the ones I am seeing.

This year seven ignition modules will be used in the dyno work with 8, 6, 4, 2, and no retard, and two more with 2 and 4 degrees advance.  The objective is to get a better idea of the peak torque vs spark advance relationship with the juice.  The engine will tell me the curves it likes best by the dyno results.  Then, I just need to pick the most retarded curve that provides decent power.  This is something I always did, although I never had enough modules to give me a good curve.  This curve analysis might be especially critical with the juice.

I was going to do all sorts of expensive strengthening of the lower end.  That might be treating a symptom rather than fixing the causative problem.     









Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #2354 on: March 11, 2016, 09:21:44 PM »
Bo, I get a Dykem type product in a rattle can. Oil doesn't seem to have much effect on it.

 That might work for you.