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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 685166 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2250 on: December 07, 2015, 01:57:29 AM »

Many years ago I went by Grandis Titanium in Rancho Margarita and bought hundred dollars of structural titanium alloy round stock in various diameters.  The carbon steel bolts on the race bike are being replaced with stainless steel bolts.  I get the stainless bolts from the street Triumph.

The street bike bolts are replaced with titanium ones that I make.  This is an upper engine mounting bolt.  The nut is stainless steel.  Titanium male and female threads will gall together just like stainless steel.  Use of a stainless nut on a ti bolt solves this problem.  Ti is difficult to machine quickly.  It took most of all day to make this bolt.  The head was machined using a milling cutter in the drill press and an indexing head.  It took lots of practice and now the setup is giving me good results.

Titanium has a much lower modulus of elasticity than steel.  They are stretchier and not as rigid as the stainless steel bolts.  I use them on the street bike rather than the race bike for this reason.  The race bike needs the extra rigidity that stainless steel offers.


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manta22
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« Reply #2251 on: December 08, 2015, 04:45:57 PM »

WW;

While I'm impressed by the effort to make your own titanium bolt, I have to ask why? Unless weight is an important factor, going from a good AN/MS/NAS bolt to titanium would be a step backward as far as strength is concerned, especially if you cut the threads on your bolt. Rolled threads are far better. I must have missed something about your application.  huh

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
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Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
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« Reply #2252 on: December 09, 2015, 11:56:29 AM »

Bo,

You might want to review the information in this last post as it is 4 valve specific.

http://www.landracing.com/forum/index.php/topic,14175.msg284882.html#new

Happy Holidays!!

 cheers
Fordboy
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I used to be a people person.  But people changed that relationship.

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« Reply #2253 on: December 09, 2015, 10:47:59 PM »

Neil, making bolts on the lathe is something I can do with one hand.  I am recovering from a carpal tunnel operation on my left hand.  Besides, I have all sorts of titanium round stock to use up.  The race bike has carbon steel bolts and I repaint them every five years or so.  The street bike has nice stainless steel bolts.  They are moved over to the race bike and I put titanium bolts on the street bike.

A set of titanium 2 into 1 headers were bought for the race bike and they are not the best setup so I moved them to the street bike.  This reduced the bike weight by 32 pounds.  The battery died and I put in a lithium one.  This saved three pounds.  All of the ti bits I make add up to something.  The street bike handles noticeably better due to this weight loss.

Mark, the cylinder head flows plenty good except at the higher cam lifts so I did these four things.  The combustion chamber walls were shrouding the valves.  I took care of that.  The header pipes are a bit small in diameter so I replaced them with the larger diameter headers from the street bike.  An old titanium race header is used on the street machine.  There was a nice pair of unused larger diameter race manifolds in my junk box that I rediscovered.  They will be used.  The head,carbs, manifolds, cams, etc were sent to the fellow that built my valve train.  He has a flow bench and knows how to use it.  Hopefully he can get a little bit more flow and better flow distribution around the valve periphery.  The intake ports had funky shapes and it seemed to concentrate flow on the valve seat adjacent to the long side.  Hopefully he can reshape the bowls to improve flow distribution.  Thanks for posting that info.  It is a big help.  Not all of us are experts and we need all of the assistance we can get.   
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2254 on: December 15, 2015, 08:53:16 PM »

My kids often said they could not wait to get out of here where we live and go as far away as possible.  It is Gretchen's turn.  She is the girl that went with me to the races for many years including the one in Wales.  She got her passport, work permit, and life savings, and left this afternoon for a city with a name that starts with "L"... in Tasmania.
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« Reply #2255 on: December 16, 2015, 09:16:13 AM »

Go gitcha a big ol piece of the world, Gretchen.  cheers

Bo, I know you must feel a little nervous over her taking off on such an adventure. I know I was with my little girl. She's 28 now, and she joined the Air Force to see the world at 18. In 3 years she got to see Texas, Arkansas, and South Dakota.  rolleyes

Since she got out, she's earned a degree in International Business, traveled, studied and worked in Japan, Taiwan, China, Singapore, Greece, Italy, Germany, Poland, Hungary, Qatar, Turkey, Oman, Bahrain, UAE, etc. Every time she leaves for another oversees trip I still get very nervous about it, but she loves it.

I'm incredibly proud of the person that she's become as a result, and I'm sure that Gretchen will make you proud too (even prouder than I know that you rightly already are).   
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« Reply #2256 on: December 16, 2015, 03:11:00 PM »

+1 with Ed smiley smiley smiley smiley

Our girls left Wisconsin for California and NY............They have been across a few oceans now that we have a little time.............they invite us to join them on some of their vacation-adventures.  Now you have to take care of your Mrs..............more than ever grin grin
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2011 AMA Record - 250cc M-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 82.5 mph
2013 AMA Record - 250cc MPS-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 88.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc M-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 130.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc MPS-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 137.7 mph
Chasis Builder / Tuner: Dave Murre
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2257 on: December 16, 2015, 09:51:52 PM »

Thanks for the advice.  Rose and I have been a bit closer to each after she left. 
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2258 on: December 31, 2015, 11:39:11 PM »

My middle son is looking for a small bench top lathe.  It is his holiday and he is doing a heroic effort to get my truck back on the road.  Buying him a lathe, or helping him to do this, might be a decent move on my part.  All of the new ones seem to be made in China.  Do any of you know an exception to this?
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« Reply #2259 on: January 01, 2016, 07:38:28 AM »

My middle son is looking for a small bench top lathe.  It is his holiday and he is doing a heroic effort to get my truck back on the road.  Buying him a lathe, or helping him to do this, might be a decent move on my part.  All of the new ones seem to be made in China.  Do any of you know an exception to this?

I don't know of any.

You might want to consider looking on Craig's list or ebay for an older Clausing, South Bend, Atlas, or Craftsman.   The Craftsmans were private label by Atlas.    Of course, not new, but I've seen some good value from time to time.   Even new stuff, unused, at reduced prices.   Be prepared to go and pick it up as opposed to shipping it.

Failing that, Grizzly Industrial or perhaps Enco might have a new offering that suits his needs.    I'm sure you will advise him to buy bigger than what he thinks he needs . . . .

Happy New Year!!

 cheers
Fordboy
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« Reply #2260 on: January 03, 2016, 09:07:13 PM »

Not sure if he has the time and patience for the older lathes that are made here.  He has a full life with a wife, job, and kids.  He likes Grizzly stuff and this lathe might do the job.  It has a milling attachment and most do not.  He is concerned about weight 'cause the marine Corps has him move every few years.  This machine weighs 293# as shipped.  The lathe should weigh around 200# with the tailstock, chuck, and accessories removed.  Two marines should have no problem moving that.  www.grizzly.com/products/G4000  Has anyone used one of these?
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2261 on: January 04, 2016, 09:23:47 PM »

It was the bike speed trials in 2014.  We drove a few miles to the pits in standing water, there was water in the pits, and the H20 near the boat ramp was deep enough to be caught by the fan and sprayed all over the engine compartment.  I made several trips back and forth through this.  Everything under the hood that could corrode did.  Lesson learned.  A few inches of water near the boat ramp is OK.  A person really needs to ask themselves if it is worth it to drive through deeper water.

I got home, did the sprinkler under the truck routine, and parked it.  Greenhouse gas emission concerns make me walk, take my bicycle, or ride the street bike.  The brakes locked up from rust.  Lesson learned.  A week after coming back from Bonneville, jack the truck up, take off the wheels, use Salt Away to wash the brakes, do the sprinkler routine, pull out the caliper pins and relube them, and oil, grease, and inspect as needed.  Drive the truck somewhere at least once a week.

Use quality made American made replacement parts with grease fittings.  My middle son did this.  Most everything was American made.  He used Moog fittings with grease nipples so I can lube the chassis.  The Toyota parts did not have grease fittings.  The truck is together and running.

The younger boy, Werner, got his bike running.  He last used it at Bonneville to set a record.  We took the motor out of the frame, I rebuilt it for LSR, put it back into the frame, and did nothing more.  It sat on his workbench for a bunch of years.  He put it together as a trail bike.  The land speed engine in the little dirt bike chassis is an interesting combination.  It is like miniature Mach III Kawasaki with knobbies.  A lot of fun.

The race bike is back on the bench.  We had a good holiday.


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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2262 on: January 08, 2016, 10:52:29 PM »

There is a paint store down near the old Southern Pacific tracks that I go to.  They sell to professionals.  I asked them about chassis paint for the truck and I described the third world conditions that I operate in.  They recommended this paint.  It takes two coats to do the job and there is no primer.  It says on the can that the only solvent that will work with the paint is the one they make.  I guess they never tried acetone.  It works great.  The paint lacks resistance to UV light.  The paint store folks sold me a clear topcoat that is UV resistant and I used it where parts will be exposed to the sun.

The paint dries quickly to a very hard finish and it is not fussy about temperature, humidity, etc.  A good aspect is the lack of fumes during drying.  I was able to dry some parts over the wood stove without everyone complaining about the smell.  Another good point is the part does not need to be absolutely rust free.  The paint will cover and neutralize light rust.  The stuff is not cheap.  That is one drawback.   


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« Reply #2263 on: January 08, 2016, 11:24:03 PM »

Jeez Bo,
     I doubt even the British heat their beer on the stove before drinking it.
This Pendine Sands thing has affected you.   tongue
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Seldom Seen Slim
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« Reply #2264 on: January 09, 2016, 08:24:07 AM »

Don, I thought he was trying to radiate extra heat from the stove. cheers
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