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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 1029920 times)

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Offline manta22

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1500 on: December 16, 2013, 11:10:36 AM »
I tried twice to post the photo.  Weird.  I will try again.

Yep-- the one on the left is a 37 degree AN fitting; the one on the right is a 45 degree SAE fitting. 45 degree fittings are what you find at automotive shops and hardware stores.
 They are NOT compatible!

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1501 on: December 16, 2013, 11:06:27 PM »
The female Parker 22 Series connectors the fellow was selling me have dual tapered seats.  They fit the 37 and 45 degree tapers male connectors in the picture.  Those guys use those female connectors cause some of us guys are not that particular about what we connect together.  I thought the counterman was an idiot.  In reality he is smart like a fox.

The hose I need will fit over barbs and it needs to be flexible so a rubber rather than a teflon or nylon liner is best.  It needs to be fire resistant.  In addition, it needs to work with gasoline/alcohol blends.  That last requirement sure eliminates a lot of hoses.  There are some fire resistant tubes that work great with gasoline and not with gasahol.  The Aeroquip/Eaton, Gates, and Parker catalogs were consulted.  The only hoses meeting my picky and unreasonable expectations are the Parker 221FR.  The hose is blue.  My printer is running out of ink and it shows it as pink.

Some literature says these fire resistant marine fuel hoses do not need fire sleeves.  I need to ask the DLRA for their opinion on this.  It would be nice to use the hose without it.
     

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1502 on: December 16, 2013, 11:43:43 PM »
These are the dual seat fittings.

Offline manta22

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1503 on: December 17, 2013, 11:08:19 AM »
Wobbly, I've never heard of those fittings. Interesting idea but I still prefer ones that have full-contact flares.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ

Offline Peter Jack

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1504 on: December 17, 2013, 01:21:38 PM »
I tend to agree with Neil but at the same time it's difficult to find a brand name with any more credibility than Parker.  :? :? :?

Pete

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1505 on: December 17, 2013, 07:34:46 PM »
Me too.  I like the larger contact area given by two 37 degree seats.

Two 5/16- inch inside diameter hoses are shown.  One is the typical braided hose I usually use.  The other is the 221FR hose.  The stuff is not cheap at $14.46 a foot.  The fire hose is some heavy duty stuff.

I tried a silver Aeroquip fire sleeve on it.  It gets really thick then and it is hard to fit.

 

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1506 on: December 18, 2013, 08:57:18 PM »
"Make sure the tank has a good breather.  Those gas cap vents are not enough many times.  A tube stuck to the gas cap is best with the end out in the breeze."  This advice is given to me by the fuel expert.  The gas consumption will be about 15 percent greater with he oxygenated fuel so I need to pay attention to this.

The Triumph gas cap has a little pressure valve in the base.  Tank fumes go up through the valve and they exit out from under the chrome plated gas cap cover.  The cap is taken apart and the little valve is removed and discarded. The cover is tossed, too.  The base, spring, ratchet mechanism, and circlip are kept.

The gas cap is replicated in aluminum.  A threaded hole is made in the center for a breather.  The two tabs are essential to make the ratchet mechanism work.  An O-ring is used to keep the fumes from going out anywhere except through the breather in the center.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1507 on: December 18, 2013, 09:07:19 PM »
This is the cap with the o-ring in place.  A Viton ring is used.  The fuel is oxygenated with alcohol and this material is resistant to gasahol damage.  The next picture shows the assembled cap.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1508 on: December 18, 2013, 09:12:44 PM »
The cap is on the tank.  The ratchet mechanism is used to point the breather line in the correct direction.  It is not needed if the breather line points straight up.

The tank has another breather that goes out from the bottom of the tank to to the charcoal canister.  It will be open, too.  The gas cap breather supplements it to insure there is plenty of venting for good fuel flow.

Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1509 on: December 18, 2013, 09:55:56 PM »
That's a neat job Bo. :cheers:

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1510 on: December 22, 2013, 09:29:19 PM »
Thanks, Mike.  The days are short here.  Long nights and foul weather.  Lots of time for machining.    This morning there was a bright glow to the south.  I thought the Russkies nuked California.  Then I remembered.  The sun.  That is what it looks like.

This is not LSR.  It is interesting.  The old race mufflers on Bonnie, the race bike, were some stainless steel glass paks.  A couple of tuners told me they were not adequate for a big bore motor.  They looked great Clyde the street bike.  Unfortunately, the internal diameter is 1.75 inches and they are far to loud for street use.  The job is to quiet them down without killing street performance.  Also, the changes need to match the EFI mapping.

First, I tried a simple choke ring as shown on the left in the photo.  It made the bike quieter but performance was poor.  It seemed to run too rich or lean at different rpm compared to the mapping.  The choke ring has a flat surface perpendicular to the flow that reflects a strong and distinct pressure wave back down towards the exhaust valve.  Maybe this is the problem.

Next I tried a baffle with a single step at a 45 degree angle, as shown to the right in the photo.  This worked much better.  It reflected a less distinct wave.

Finally, I made the baffles shown in the second photo.  They step down from the 1.746 original pipe diameter to 0.975 inches in five increments.  All steps are beveled at 45 degree angles.  The heights of the steps and the distances between them are not the same.  This is intentionally done to reduce the intensity of any reflected waves.  These baffles work great.  They quiet the bike down and do not hurt performance on the street, as best as I can tell.  They match the mapping.   
 

Offline RidgeRunner

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1511 on: December 23, 2013, 08:44:26 AM »
     Down home old school "try it and see what happens" engineering.  The kind I like and all very interesting. 

     Thanks for shareing.

                                   Ed

                         

Offline tauruck

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1512 on: December 23, 2013, 12:51:29 PM »
RR, you're right.

There is always something going on in Bo's thread.

Lots of innovation. A true hot rodder. :cheers: :cheers:

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1513 on: December 23, 2013, 11:03:10 PM »
My baffle setup is not optimum.  It is the best I can do at present.  All of these aftermarket Triumph mufflers I can find are variations on a common theme regardless of their external shape.  They have big tubes down the middle with louvered or holed walls that are surrounded by packing.  The only way to quiet them down is to choke them.  This restricts flow and causes back pressure.

What I am loooking for are old style chamber mufflers where the flow is simply directed in different directions and the entire chamber is used to convey the gas.  This way the openings are large and non restrictive.  The picture from Google shows a typical style.

Flow and performance testing in my younger days showed me these big old mufflers worked just great.  Making one is beyond me.  It is sort of like building a ship in a bottle, as best as I can tell.

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners
« Reply #1514 on: December 25, 2013, 08:49:51 PM »
The carriage shed is happening.  These photos are from the night before last.  The bike bench is in the interior photo.  It was built early so the carpenters can use it as a table.