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Author Topic: motorcycle streamliner water/cooling  (Read 5433 times)
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ironwigwam
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« on: October 21, 2008, 04:59:07 PM »

This is not really about rules but more geared to a question as to cooling chains and brake rotors. This past year at BUB after the fatality, we finally got our liner race ready for tech and were told to incorporate a cooling system of dripping water on chain and rear rotor for cooling from high speeds, then we will probably need them . Problem is, I never may any free time to see what the other teams use for this. I was thinking of a 3 quart tank with an electric solenoid to turn on when out riggers are lifted and use gravity to drip water on rotor and chain thru copper lines? Then when thevout riggers are brought back down , the water would turn off if any was still in tank.
   What does everyone do for this situation? Any thoughts?
    Rocky
    1957S/VG
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1212FBGS
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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2008, 05:31:35 PM »

how fast ya plannin on goin?
kr
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Sumner
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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2008, 05:44:00 PM »

This is not really about rules but more geared to a question as to cooling chains and brake rotors. This past year at BUB after the fatality, we finally got our liner race ready for tech and were told to incorporate a cooling system of dripping water on chain and rear rotor for cooling from high speeds, then we will probably need them . Problem is, I never may any free time to see what the other teams use for this. I was thinking of a 3 quart tank with an electric solenoid to turn on when out riggers are lifted and use gravity to drip water on rotor and chain thru copper lines? Then when thevout riggers are brought back down , the water would turn off if any was still in tank.
   What does everyone do for this situation? Any thoughts?
    Rocky
    1957S/VG

Hopefully Kent or Mike will respond as they have some nice systems now.  Dripping is not going to do it in my opinion.  You will need a pump to get some pressure.

Here are a couple pictures of Mike's Ack Attack and cooling for the rotor and I thought he was also spraying the chain, but can't see that here.  I thought Mike or Kent had a long rail that the chain slid on or near that had multiple points for water spray.

c ya,

Sum



* rotor_cooling-1.jpg (36.98 KB, 560x365 - viewed 282 times.)

* rotor_cooling-2.jpg (39.92 KB, 560x420 - viewed 242 times.)

* rotor_cooling-3.jpg (39.22 KB, 560x420 - viewed 265 times.)
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1212FBGS
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« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2008, 07:15:48 PM »

looks like mikes system has evolved over the past few years  grin nice color on the disc....
kent
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John Noonan
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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2008, 12:01:37 AM »

looks like mikes system has evolved over the past few years  grin nice color on the disc....
kent

At least it now works..I ran the bike a few times and either brakes did not work or the Chute did not open.

John   AKA the crash test ..well you know.....

I am glad to have been the only rider that never wrecked or fell over.. grin

J
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ack
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« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2008, 07:02:20 PM »

This is not really about rules but more geared to a question as to cooling chains and brake rotors. This past year at BUB after the fatality, we finally got our liner race ready for tech and were told to incorporate a cooling system of dripping water on chain and rear rotor for cooling from high speeds, then we will probably need them . Problem is, I never may any free time to see what the other teams use for this. I was thinking of a 3 quart tank with an electric solenoid to turn on when out riggers are lifted and use gravity to drip water on rotor and chain thru copper lines? Then when thevout riggers are brought back down , the water would turn off if any was still in tank.
   What does everyone do for this situation? Any thoughts?
    Rocky
    1957S/VG

We use some of the intercooler water to cool the chains.  Don’t need much just the head pressure from the intercooler which is about 18” above the tubes that feed the water to the chains.  About one quart for both chains during a run is fine chains are cool to the touch at the end of a run.  We have a switch that we turn on just before Rocky takes off that opens a small ¼” solenoid to allow the water to gravity feed.  The outlet tubes are ¼” OD 3/16” ID. We flatten them out to restrict the flow. You have to get the water inside the chain at the point where it intersects the drive sprocket. High quality O ring chains are a must.

The brake cooling diverts the intercooler water which is flowing at 19 GPM to the brake rotors and brake caliper when Rocky steps on the brake petal.  This is done with a brake light switch and a couple of  ¾” solenoid valves.   
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Sumner
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« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2008, 07:06:33 PM »

.....................We use some of the intercooler water to cool the chains.  Don’t need much just the head pressure from the intercooler which is about 18” above the tubes that feed the water to the chains.  About one quart for both chains during a run is fine chains are cool to the touch at the end of a run......................................

Thanks for the info Mike.  I thought someone was spraying a mist on the chains directly or through a channel, but if it wasn't you or Kent then I guess I just dreamed it up  cool ,

Sum

P.S. One thing we all have to remember is that your runs take way less time than most of ours will.
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ironwigwam
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« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2008, 06:35:23 PM »

Kr, I would like to get over 200.
  Thanks Mike for the info. I think I will stay the course of my plans and aim the water at  the drive sprocket for now.
    Rocky
    1957S/VG
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Queeziryder
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« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2008, 02:51:42 PM »

Hi,
On Max's liner we are currently using an air over pressurised water system which is uses on tank for cooling the drive chain, also a seperate tank for cooling the clutch assembly.

Neil

If you ask Max nicely he will probably be able to go into more detail for you grin
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Dean Los Angeles
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« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2008, 06:27:52 PM »

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Kr, I would like to get over 200.
That puts you in with a very large group of people!

If the chain is heating then friction is your problem.  I would enclose the chain and run an oil spray.
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1212FBGS
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« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2008, 08:50:58 PM »

oil doesnt work that good and it makes a mess...been there done that....water has a much better cooling btu ability and is much cheeper
kent
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JimL
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« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2008, 11:49:11 PM »

I was also thinking of an oil cooling system, but the vision of finely vaporized oil, in a nicely aerated cloud, right behind my butt....near my exhaust pipes.... tongue

I pictured a large orange ball of flame, chasing me...and decided I wouldn't invent that "better mousetrap" after all.

Water sounds good.
Regards, JimL
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Superfast Matt McCoy
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« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2008, 06:16:54 PM »

What are you supposed to do if you are using a drum brake?  Drip on the outside?
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1212FBGS
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« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2008, 10:58:04 PM »

why would you run a drum brake?
Sum my car liner has the long teflon chain guides that are gun drilled with ports drilled in the tops to spray water
kent
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Stainless1
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« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2008, 11:23:39 PM »

Quote
Kr, I would like to get over 200.
That puts you in with a very large group of people!

If the chain is heating then friction is your problem.  I would enclose the chain and run an oil spray.

Don't worry about chain cooling until you are approaching 300, that is probably where you will have an issue.  Lots of biikes going well over 200 without chain cooling... get there first  wink then worry  rolleyes
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Stainless
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