Landracing Forum Home
November 19, 2018, 12:26:47 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
BACK TO LANDRACING.COM HOMEPAGE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  


(Note: Donations are not tax deductible)







Live Audio Streaming and Archives of Past Events
Next Live Event: TBD
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Tubing Notchers and Benders??  (Read 32152 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
isiahstites
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 1149





Ignore
« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2008, 01:57:33 AM »

I'll do some pics in a couple of weeks, plan to be real busy next week.

Rex


Thanks
Logged
isiahstites
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 1149





Ignore
« Reply #31 on: November 23, 2008, 03:05:16 AM »

I'll do some pics in a couple of weeks, plan to be real busy next week.

Rex

Any chance of getting those pics now Rex?

Scott
Logged
Rex Schimmer
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Fulton, CA
Posts: 2280


Only time and money prevent completion!




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: November 23, 2008, 06:50:47 PM »

OK isiahstites here it is the "hammer and torch" method of fitting tubine. First a couple of words of advice: Don't uses this method with 4130 tubing. Once you have it cut with the torch it is a bitch to file. It works great on heavy wall mild steel tubing or pipe. This method is not as nice or clean or easy as using a joint saw, the quality of the fit is directly proportional to the amount of work you put into it. More experience will get it done faster and better.

Tools required: Torch with good cutting head. Gloves, good shades or goggles, a good quality large radius 1/2 round file, floor mounted grinder, disk or belt, mine is a 12 inch disc.

This proceedure is to make a tube joint that is a 90 degree joint. I sometimes will mark the tube with calk to somewhat outline the cut that I am looking for, next you hold the torch at the center of the tube back from the end where you made your mark, angle the torch approx 45 degrees (see picture). Once the torch has made its puddle you hit the ox and you will blow a hole in the tube at an angle, now move the torch in a straight line back and forth across the tube. If you have your ox set at around 35-40 psi the torch will cut completely to the end of the tube. ( see pics again). Turn the tube 180 degrees and do the same for the other side. Now you have the big pieces out and the real work begins, using the disc grinder and the file remove any material that will prevent a good fit up between the tubes. (In other words this is were the work come in!) I did this fit up in about 5 minutes. Tubing is 1-3/4 dia x .095 wall.


Just to show the correct way to install a diagonal tube for proper "excentricity" I cut a second tube to match into the joint at 45 degrees. Again it took about 5 minutes to cut, grind and file this joint so that it could be welded. You can see that the diagonal is welded to each leg of the 90 degree joint and the center lines of each tube would cross at the same place. This is strongest, and stiffest joint design you can use for diagonals. It is a little more work but worth it for the increase strength.

I will do a couple of more post to get all of the pics.

Rex


* First_Side_4.jpg (79.42 KB, 700x525 - viewed 281 times.)
Logged

Rex

Not much matters and the rest doesn't matter at all.
Rex Schimmer
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Fulton, CA
Posts: 2280


Only time and money prevent completion!




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: November 23, 2008, 06:53:50 PM »

Let me see if I can figure out how to post more than one pic. OK the pic in the first post is really number 4 of the progress.

Rex


* Tools_required_1.jpg (115.91 KB, 700x525 - viewed 231 times.)

* Torch_angle_2.jpg (81.9 KB, 700x525 - viewed 234 times.)

* First_cut_3.jpg (74.63 KB, 700x525 - viewed 260 times.)

* Both_sides_cut_5.jpg (86.17 KB, 700x525 - viewed 230 times.)
Logged

Rex

Not much matters and the rest doesn't matter at all.
Rex Schimmer
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Fulton, CA
Posts: 2280


Only time and money prevent completion!




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: November 23, 2008, 06:55:42 PM »

The rest of the pics.

Rex


* After_file_and_grinding_6.jpg (66.08 KB, 700x525 - viewed 242 times.)

* Tube_fit_up_7.jpg (70.92 KB, 700x525 - viewed 241 times.)

* Welded_8.jpg (75.94 KB, 700x525 - viewed 227 times.)

* Diagonal_fit_9.jpg (107.84 KB, 700x525 - viewed 256 times.)
Logged

Rex

Not much matters and the rest doesn't matter at all.
Rex Schimmer
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Fulton, CA
Posts: 2280


Only time and money prevent completion!




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: November 23, 2008, 06:57:08 PM »

One more pic to show the excentricity of the diagonal tube weld solid.

Rex


* Excentricity_10.jpg (96.6 KB, 700x525 - viewed 304 times.)
Logged

Rex

Not much matters and the rest doesn't matter at all.
isiahstites
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 1149





Ignore
« Reply #36 on: November 23, 2008, 07:42:49 PM »

Thanks a lot Rex! The pictures are worth a thousand words, great write-up and work.

Scott
Logged
Tzoom
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 71
Location: Clarion, IA
Posts: 137


All revved up with no place to go - Meatloaf 1977




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: November 23, 2008, 08:27:57 PM »

Go here and scroll down to tubemitre.exe for a program for making templates for cutting notches.  http://www.ihpva.org./tools/index.html  Real easy to use.  Enter the dimensions/angle, print and cutout the template.  Trace the outline on the tubing and cut.
Logged

Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports ... all others are games --- Ernest Hemingway
Cajun Kid
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 56
Location: Winston Salem, North Carolina
Posts: 3189


Venable Rod's & Racing #805 Studebaker, #806 Ford




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: November 24, 2008, 08:24:03 AM »

I am not cut out for welding or cutting !!!  Was at a friends shop and tried out his Plasma cutter.. yeah I cut a straight lines but was all herky jerky following a guide,,, man I have a better appreciation for all you welders and fabricators... I am going to need a lot of practice.

Charles
Logged

ECTA Record Holder Maxton
E/CBFALT, E/CBGALT, E/CGALT, E/CFALT, A/CGALT, C/CGALT, D/CGALT, C/CBGALT, B/CBGALT, C/CFALT
OHIO
B/CGALT, C/CGALT

LTA Record Holder and 200 Club Member
A/CBFALT, B/CBFALT, C/CBFALT, C/CFALT, C/CGALT,   E/CGALT, E/CFALT

Fastest Standing Mile at Ohio  203.343mph
Fastest Standing Mile at Maxton 196.967mph
Fastest Standing 1.5 Mile at Loring 213.624mph
Fastest Standing Mile at Loring 204.109mph

http://s261.photobucket.com/albums/ii43/cajunkid5690/

Blog    www.venablerodsandracing.com
email   venableracing@gmail.com
GH
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Age: 77
Location: Springfield, Missouri
Posts: 839





Ignore
« Reply #39 on: November 24, 2008, 09:47:39 AM »

Charles, I could save you a lot of work. Just buy my Studebaker!!!!!
Logged
SPARKY
Global Moderator
Hero Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 76
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 6577




« Reply #40 on: November 24, 2008, 10:10:29 AM »

Scott,  I have a notcher that I have used a lot----but I am beginning to use a cut off wheel in a angle grinder to do small jobs and odd angles rather than set it up, ----BUT be careful as you Walk it around the tube ---as you get deeper in the tube it can bite and kick the grinder out if you don't keep it absolutely paralle to the cut------Wear a full face shield and gloves and KEEP the grinder shield on loosely---you will have to stop and rotate the shield as you walk  the cut off wheel around the pipe---the torch technique Rex has shown is safer in my opinion!!!!!!  I use the pedstal grinder to bevel and finial fit the fishmouth.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2008, 11:28:51 AM by SPARKY » Logged

Miss LIBERTY,  changing TKI  to noise, dust and RUST!!!

The # 1 issue is: TO KEEP THE REPUBLIC      
   Center for Self Governance            tncsg.org     mrspowell.org

"Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."   Helen Keller
Cajun Kid
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 56
Location: Winston Salem, North Carolina
Posts: 3189


Venable Rod's & Racing #805 Studebaker, #806 Ford




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: November 24, 2008, 10:39:37 AM »

GH,, I know you are right. The initial cost to buy your car would be less. But in the long run it would be more.

I would have to modify it so I can get in and out, I would have to change motors, then repaint it to my signature satin black with white lettering and red trim...  I am sure the list would go on..

My new Crank for the New Vicky motor just arrived, so hope to begin assembly soon. (The exisiting Vicky E motor will make a great choice for my Studebaker build, unless It sells, then have another block to start on for a good "D" platform as well.)  Hope to have  3 power plants by spring    "C", "D" and "E"

Thanks again for the offer...cash is tight with the new shop build finishing up today,,, have to hope market comes back so I can finish the Stude for 2009 season.. Keep in touch.

Charles

Logged

ECTA Record Holder Maxton
E/CBFALT, E/CBGALT, E/CGALT, E/CFALT, A/CGALT, C/CGALT, D/CGALT, C/CBGALT, B/CBGALT, C/CFALT
OHIO
B/CGALT, C/CGALT

LTA Record Holder and 200 Club Member
A/CBFALT, B/CBFALT, C/CBFALT, C/CFALT, C/CGALT,   E/CGALT, E/CFALT

Fastest Standing Mile at Ohio  203.343mph
Fastest Standing Mile at Maxton 196.967mph
Fastest Standing 1.5 Mile at Loring 213.624mph
Fastest Standing Mile at Loring 204.109mph

http://s261.photobucket.com/albums/ii43/cajunkid5690/

Blog    www.venablerodsandracing.com
email   venableracing@gmail.com
Peter Jack
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Age: 75
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3544





Ignore
« Reply #42 on: November 24, 2008, 11:44:01 AM »

I built a special clamp to go on my 14" abrasive cut off saw. It works fast and really well and is a lot safer than using a cut off wheel in a grinder. I'll post as picture later.

Charles, don't give up! Concentrate on relaxing. It'll take a while but once you get there you've got it made.

Pete
Logged
Rex Schimmer
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Fulton, CA
Posts: 2280


Only time and money prevent completion!




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: November 24, 2008, 04:00:51 PM »

Pete,
I really like your idea using an abrasive chop saw. I am looking forward to seeing pictures of your attachement. It would do the same thing as my "blue wrench" method except be a bunch cleaner and less work with the file and grinder.

I have thought about a chop saw for my shop and now that I am getting closer to doing some "tube" work on my race car project and if I added your idea it would make a lot of sense.

Rex
Logged

Rex

Not much matters and the rest doesn't matter at all.
doug odom
Global Moderator
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 77
Location: Arroyo Grande, Ca. aka Big Ditch
Posts: 412


WWW
« Reply #44 on: November 24, 2008, 04:23:42 PM »

After I chop saw the tubing if I have a weird or hard to fit angle I will wrap a piece of paper around and tape it together to make a tube. Then slide the paper out over the end and start cutting with scissors till I get the fit just right. That gives you the pattern you need. Slip it over the tube you are going to fit and mark the pattern on the tube. Grind off to the pattern marks and it should fit the same as the paper did.
Logged

Doug Odom in big ditch

How old would you be now if you didn't know how old you are?
If you can't race it or take it to bed - it ain't worth having.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page June 28, 2018, 05:29:53 PM