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Author Topic: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build  (Read 490324 times)
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Mobacken Racing
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« Reply #1755 on: June 08, 2018, 02:45:23 PM »

I fitted the T2 probe just now.



I drilled the 5mm hole through one of the diffuser wedges and threaded the compressor cover with 1/8"NPT.



Here you can see the end of the temp probe.



As far as I can tell the modifications to the engine core are done and I can start putting it back together, when it is back in the test rig I will fit all of the gauges along with a jet pipe pressure pitot tube.

Cheers!
/Anders
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grumm441
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« Reply #1756 on: June 08, 2018, 07:10:08 PM »

I fitted the T2 probe just now.





Cheers!
/Anders

I like that  hands free drill
G
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Chief Motorcycle Steward Dry Lakes Racers Australia Inc
Wazavudu Bellytank  Spirit of Sunshine Bellytank
Mobacken Racing
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« Reply #1757 on: June 14, 2018, 05:28:13 AM »

I like that  hands free drill
G


Actually I drilled the pilot hole through the diffusor vane in the mill, then I bolted everything together and drilled the rest through by hand.
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grumm441
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« Reply #1758 on: June 15, 2018, 04:58:49 AM »

It's just that i can't see your hand
G
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Chief Motorcycle Steward Dry Lakes Racers Australia Inc
Wazavudu Bellytank  Spirit of Sunshine Bellytank
Mobacken Racing
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« Reply #1759 on: June 17, 2018, 11:40:44 AM »

Aha!  grin

One step backwards and one forward. Last night when I was assembling the engine core I managed to turn the thrust bearing the wrong way and before I noticed it the thin cast alloy wall that holds the thrust washer cracked.....

Breaking the cast diffuser plate with countless of hours of work put into it was no fun feeling, I had to sit down and consider my options for a while before I came up with a solution. It never occurred to me to take any pics of the damage, I had other things on my mind.

Since that thin wall was the only thing acting against the axial thrust it might have failed sooner or later anyway, so I decided to remove the damaged wall and turn a recess into which a stainless wall can be fitted.



Here I have started making the stainless part, I have milled and threaded two M4 holes to secure it.



The thrust washer is dropped in place just for reference.



A pair of matching recesses were milled in the part for the M4 screws, now it can┤t go anywhere. After the pic was taken I drilled the three 3mm holes for the thrust washer so everything could be screwed together.



I took .05mm cuts from the stainless wall until the end to end axial bearing clearance was 0.20mm, well within specs but on the sloppy side in case something tightens up when the engine heats up. Now I just have to mill the oil ports that lets oil in from the backside of the wall to the thrust washer, then I can continue assembling the engine.

The best thing about this is that the axial clearance is set by removable parts and not the diffuser plate itself, so any modifications in the future can be done to these small parts without risking any damage to the cast part.

Pheww. Smiley
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Mobacken Racing
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« Reply #1760 on: June 18, 2018, 11:30:18 PM »

Hi Ralph,

I didn┤t quite understand what you meant at first, but after watching the video it all came clear. That it a very clever way of smoothening down a surface that for some reason can┤t be grinded! Thank you a lot for showing me, I will remember this method for later.

Last night I finished the stainless insert by milling the oil ports and flow enhance them a bit with a file, I also tested the clearance with my kids playing clay and I got a uniform clearance all the way around the axial bearing so everything seems ok.



After that I could start assemble the engine again, a very simple job since there is no internal fuel supply or preheat lines that I need to be careful with.



I have also adjusted the radial holes in the engine cover a bit so now all of the securing screws fit without fuzz.



The last thing to do is to fit the fuel manifold, I will leak test it with compressed air and some soap water later to see if the gaskets are still leak free and then I can start installing the engine in the test rig!



Cheers!
/Anders
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Mobacken Racing
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« Reply #1761 on: June 21, 2018, 02:33:51 PM »

Last night I leak tested the fuel manifold with compressed air and soap water, no leaks at all up to 6 bar so we are good to go. Smiley



The engine is back in the test rig now, the impingement air hose is on the top waiting to be coupled to the scuba tank. Now I just have to move all of the temp and pressure gauges from the bike dashboard to the test stand so I can watch and video tape them during the test runs.



A hose company sponsored me with a length of steel spring reinforced hose suitable for oil up to 90░C, I will use it for the oil return from the engine and the regulator so I can see the oil flow going back to the tank.



I have also made a fan mount for a new and more compact 12V preheat fan for the engine, the old one was very bulky and made a noise like a fog horn when running so this will be a nice improvement. I will keep it running all the time so it will get a cold air flow going through the engine after shutdown.



Have a great midsummer eve folks!
/Anders
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