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Author Topic: Simpler Subject?? Paint  (Read 12312 times)
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Dynoroom
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« on: April 10, 2008, 12:19:30 AM »

OK folks, same issue as the fiberglass post. I've never painted with automotive paint. Tell me some of the ways you paint your cars. I have a older (not state approved) spray gun and I know to use a good water trap but could use information on prep work, types of paint etc. I'm only going to spray one color.

Thanks in advance.........
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Michael LeFevers
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« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2008, 12:38:10 AM »

I should be painting my bike in the next month or two and will do a full report.

I like to use PPG products and your paint job is only as good as your prep work. An old friend of mine always tell me the prep is the most important and the body guy never gets credit good or bad. When someone see's a paint job on a bike/car they always ask who painted it, not who did the bodywork.

Scott

Here is the last bike I painted.






My make-shift paint booth.
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Sumner
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« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2008, 10:04:14 PM »

To add to Scott's points, and nice paint job Scott, I would get a gravity feed gun if you don't have one.  Here is a link to a Harbor Freight gun that is a darn good gun for the money....

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=43430

.............. I have instructions on how to use it along with the model that preceded in on my site here.....

http://purplesagetradingpost.com/sumner/techinfo/techinfo.html#Auto

........ go to the second to last link at the bottom.

Scott on your improvised paint booth I might make a suggestion.  Instead of the heavier blue tarps that are more expensive and you might be tempted to re-use I use the think throw-away clear plastic drop cloths that you can find in the paint dept. at the hardware store.  I take a staple gun and just staple them to the walls and when done tear them down and throw them away.

Mike you want something like that to keep the paint off of your tools, etc. and to keep all the dust that is on your tools, well maybe not yours, and the walls from blowing off and getting in the paint.

With the HF HVLP (high volume low pressure) gun you can spray the primer coats without covering anything as there is almost no over spray.  That also saves buying expensive paint.  If you do the final coats in base/clear you will want everything very clean then as you won't be sanding the junk out like if it gets into the primer.  Also the clear will fog all over the place even with the HVLP gun.

Make sure the air compressor is up to the job on the final color coats as you can't wait for it to catch up with you on those.  A bare minimum is a 5 hp 2 cylinder with a 60 gallon tank or so.  A 2 stage compressor is much better. 

I have more on doing the body work on my site here..........

http://purplesagetradingpost.com/sumner/techinfo/tech--body-paint-index.html

........... and Scott is absolutely right the body man should get 90% of the credit on a good paint job and the spray guy 10%.  If you use base/clear you can easily fix any step as you go along and it is much easier to repair later.

c ya,

Sum
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Dean Los Angeles
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2008, 07:45:54 PM »

Think in terms of a clean room. Dust and dirt are the enemy.

Make sure you have enough room to move around while you paint. Put up plastic walls, ceiling, and floor. If the wind is blowing hard, don't paint. Give your self a work surface inside the plastic. Every time you go in or out dirt is coming in. Your clothes shed lint. It's amazing how much stuff floats around waiting for wet paint.

The paint covers the surface you give it. Good, bad, or ugly, if the surface looks that way before paint it will look that way after. No matter how much time you put in to preparation, when you are done, really done, spend another hour. Take a bright, hand-held light and put it parallel to the surface and look for bumps. Not only the small variety, but long hills and valleys too.

Your hand is the best device for determining surface finish.
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2008, 08:46:43 PM »

Here's a lesson I learned the hard way - If you're working in a garage where you can't control the temp and humidity (issues I'm sure others can explain better than I can), be careful on warm and/or humid days - not because of the effect humidity can have on paint and primer, but because sweat dripping from your arm or face can ruin your work, especially in a plastic enclosed environment. 

Back when I was 17, I was shooting enamal on my Cyclone and had to re-prep the hood due to perspiration drops from my hand.  Young, dumb, and in a hurry.  If it's too hot and humid to work in a long sleeve shirt, it's too hot and humid to be painting.
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2008, 05:06:03 PM »

A good rule of thumb when prepping if you can feel it, you will see it when painting. Finish prep with 400-600 w/d sandpaper. Use base coat/clear coat it is more forgiving for rookie painters. When clearing wait till each coat is almost dust free between coats. 2 coats of clear is enough for a quickie but go 4 if you want to color-sand and buff. Today's materials are formulated to work best with an HVLP but I have sprayed newer products with a conventional gun. Just over thin the clear a little. If you live in California I didn't say that.
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2008, 05:44:13 PM »

I guide coat every step, even the bondo.  You can just work so much faster and see what is going on so much easier. I still use my hand, but the guide coat is more accurate.  I also wear cloth gloves, the cheap brown ones, when sanding.  They protect your fingers and you can actually feel imperfections better with the gloves on and you aren't getting the oil off your skin into the paint.  For the guide coat I recommend the stuff that comes in a rattle can and is specifically made as a guide coat.  It only costs a couple bucks and doesn't gum your paper and is easy to see and work with and dusts on really nice.

c ya,

Sum
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« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2008, 07:03:19 PM »

Hey guys lets see a few pictures of some of your work.

Scott
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Harold Bettes
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« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2008, 09:35:36 PM »

In order to not overload the bandwidth with pics...... grin

Just take a look at the result of any run in any paint and any color. That is descriptive of my absolute lack of talent in that area.  rolleyes

I can't even get flat black to stay flat! shocked

However, I would certainly enjoy any tips and tricks that would allow me to do something with paint other than be able to mix it or strain it!  tongue huh

Regards to All,
HB2 smiley
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« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2008, 10:40:49 PM »

Hey guys lets see a few pictures of some of your work.

Scott

Mine is under my name to the left  evil, Of course after 13 years on the salt it doesn't look quite as good anymore.  I'll do something about that, but only after a lakester that I know about makes a pass,

Sum
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« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2008, 12:33:45 PM »

Has anyone found an easy and effective way of removing the mill scale from steel tubing prior to priming?
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« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2008, 01:00:59 PM »

Rubber gloves, lacquer thinner and a scuff pad
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Stainless1
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« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2008, 01:52:19 PM »

Has anyone found an easy and effective way of removing the mill scale from steel tubing prior to priming?

Sand Blaster works and makes it ready to paint after a little wipe down.
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Stainless
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« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2008, 02:44:47 PM »

I would add to take a little time and make some sturdy bucks to screw your bike parts to...I have painted many a part hanging form string like Scott's photos(not a jab Scott, it takes  talent I know too well to lay down a nice paint job while cussing and catching the part on the return swing.. grin)...but seriously, and again from experience...light fibergalss parts WILL fly off the saw horse from the air from your gun. Like everyone has said, take much more time than you want too on the prep, don't sand with a heavy hand on anything over 220 grit, never sand in circles.
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Dynoroom
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« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2008, 04:32:02 PM »

OK, now that we're only about a month away from Speedweek I went in and reread the information in this post. Some questions come to mind as I get ready to squirt some color on the fiberglass part of this oh to long project.

We need to talk about all the work involved in the process. Do you wipe down the body after you sand it? OK what do you use?
How many coats of primer and do you need to thin it? Same with the paint. If you do need to thin it how much? What with? How long do you let it dry? Do you wipe it done between coats?
This will not be a show winning paint job, it will most likely be redone I just didn't want to go to the salt in primer only. So lets see what you guys come up with for a quick and easy paint job. OK nothing has been easy so I'm sure this wont be either.  evil
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Michael LeFevers
Kugel and LeFevers Pontiac Firebird

Without Data You're Just Another Guy With An Opinion!

Racing is just a series of "Problem Solving" events that allow you to spend money & make noise...
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