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Author Topic: Marlo Treit's Liner  (Read 176796 times)
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Freud
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« Reply #45 on: October 19, 2007, 10:22:52 PM »

The dimples are spuds welded into the roll cage that will mount the carrier plate for the air brakes.

The area defined by the masking tape is the section that will cover the roll bars. It will be cut out
and permanently attached to the roll cage.

The third image shows the two sections that will complete the tail and are supported by the piece of
tubing from a prior foto.



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PJQ
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« Reply #46 on: October 22, 2007, 10:35:00 PM »

Such a quality build!
The more you look, the little things stand out, like amazing corner gussets.


And the work on the latches. And the blower arrangement. The exhaust. And the... and that... and, and, and. I'm a bit excited!

When this liner makes it to Oz, the crew will be shooing me off like an Outback fly (and they're Dodge persistent).
It would be a real privilege to meet the builders and check it out up close.

Question out of ignorance: would stability become an issue when air brakes like this are used at speed, or is that overcome with the weight of the vehicle?
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PJQ
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« Reply #47 on: October 22, 2007, 11:23:10 PM »

Thinking out loud attempting to answer my own question...
I guess the parachute(s) will be used at the same time as the air brake?
The air brake will radically change the flow across the body and the parachute(s) will probably need to deploy further away from the back of the car to be efficient?

Unless: the brake is used after the chutes grab, in which case, will the air brake be effective?
I guess 500+ is a long way from 200 and things would be different out there. For a non flyer type, 500+ is pretty hard to get your head around (200 ain't so hard to think about). I have imaginings of a very bouncy ride slamming an air brake on at anything over 300 (no matter what the weight or body shape).
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PJQ
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Freud
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« Reply #48 on: October 23, 2007, 12:12:28 AM »

Wait for the Bargains......... The ticket went down to $60. Less than half price.
What a deal.
I'll reply regarding the air brake and chutes in a day or so. I'll also be going to Humes Wednesday for more fotos.

FREUD
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Freud
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« Reply #49 on: October 23, 2007, 11:50:59 PM »


The answer to PJQ's question regarding the air brake.

At the time the air brake was designed and machined it was considered to be the primary deployment at the end of the run.

The car is never static. Anything that seems to be an improvement is considered. In the case of the air brake, new products have been acquired that have changed the plans. An adequate supply of chutes has been acquired and they will probably be the first line in braking. These chutes will withstand a load of 10,000# at Mach 1. The car doesn't weigh that much and won't go that fast.

Testing at progressively higher speeds will determine the final pattern of use.

PJQ, that was a good question.  I hope my answer was adequate.

FREUD
« Last Edit: October 24, 2007, 12:08:06 AM by Freud » Logged

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« Reply #50 on: October 24, 2007, 08:47:07 PM »

Such a quality build!
The more you look, the little things stand out, like amazing corner gussets.

And the work on the latches. And the blower arrangement. The exhaust. And the... and that... and, and, and. I'm a bit excited!

When this liner makes it to Oz, the crew will be shooing me off like an Outback fly (and they're Dodge persistent).
It would be a real privilege to meet the builders and check it out up close.

Question out of ignorance: would stability become an issue when air brakes like this are used at speed, or is that overcome with the weight of the vehicle?

I'll second that, I sit and amazed at the quality of work.  I can't fathom the amount of man hours that will go into this before it's done, and look forward to they day I hopefully see it run!
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Dr Goggles
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« Reply #51 on: October 24, 2007, 09:43:26 PM »

Such a quality build!
The more you look, the little things stand out, like amazing corner gussets.

And the work on the latches. And the blower arrangement. The exhaust. And the... and that... and, and, and. I'm a bit excited!

When this liner makes it to Oz, the crew will be shooing me off like an Outback fly (and they're Dodge persistent).
It would be a real privilege to meet the builders and check it out up close.

I'll second that, I sit and amazed at the quality of work.  I can't fathom the amount of man hours that will go into this before it's done, and look forward to they day I hopefully see it run!

I think I've written this before but yes it is incredible , I can't wait to see it out here in OZ ....I'll go one better and do my utmost to make it look even better by parking our car next to it.... grin grin grin...it'll be a bit like Tiny Tim jammin' with the London Philharmonic..............
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Few understand what I'm trying to do but they vastly outnumber those who understand why...................

http://thespiritofsunshine.blogspot.com/

Current Australian E/GL record holder at 215.041mph

THE LUCKIEST MAN IN SLOW BUSINESS.
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« Reply #52 on: October 24, 2007, 11:44:42 PM »

I've been involved with this project since day one. I have come to a very learned conclusion.
It seems to me to be easy when you have enough tools.
Take a quick look into Hume's "tool fetish" driven operation.
Image 34: An original Frost English Wheel, 42" throat and a multitude of lower anvil wheels.
The rubber top wheels are for forming w/o stretching  the material.
Image 35: TM Tech Air Planishing hammer. In the background is the Jet Vertical Mill.
Image 29: The Bead Roller has a variety of forming wheels.
Image 28:  The drawer of hand made Flaring Dies run from 3/8" to 3" in 3/8" increments.
There is a separate set of dies below this layer that have a gradual radius for special
applications. The machinist retired when he finished this set.




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« Last Edit: October 25, 2007, 12:06:13 AM by Freud » Logged

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Freud
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« Reply #53 on: October 25, 2007, 12:24:41 AM »

The tool fetish is evident in the vise Grip department.
The attached wooden pieces allow a tight squeeze w/o the problem
of dimples in the metal. Surface finish is a priority and this helps.
He also found several "older items", that he just couldn't resist,
at a garage sale. After all, a vise is just like a camera tripod.
You use the biggest one you can carry.



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« Last Edit: October 25, 2007, 12:28:31 AM by Freud » Logged

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« Reply #54 on: October 25, 2007, 12:30:24 AM »

I've been involved with this project since day one. I have come to a very learned conclusion.
It seems to me to be easy when you have enough tools.
Take a quick look into Hume's "tool fetish" driven operation.
/quote]

Freud, you could give most people all the tools in the world and not 1% of them could do half as good a job, it is the artest not the tools that get the job done.
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John Gowetski, red hat @ 221.183 MPH MSA Lakester, Bockscar #1000 60 ci normally aspirated w/N20
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« Reply #55 on: October 25, 2007, 10:38:05 AM »

What is the percentage when we include Stainless?

FREUD
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Stainless1
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« Reply #56 on: October 25, 2007, 02:09:33 PM »

Bout 50 50 I'd guess...
thanks for thinking of me, did you pee your pants again???
Just kidding of course, have a good one Freud....  grin
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Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.
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« Reply #57 on: October 25, 2007, 02:14:37 PM »

Bout 50 50 I'd guess...
thanks for thinking of me, did you pee your pants again???
Just kidding of course, have a good one Freud....  grin
Able to use half the tools and hurt yourself with the other half?
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John Gowetski, red hat @ 221.183 MPH MSA Lakester, Bockscar #1000 60 ci normally aspirated w/N20
Freud
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« Reply #58 on: October 25, 2007, 04:28:38 PM »

Many tools have multiple uses.

The original intent and second duty as a bottle opener.

Stainless can easily adapt to the alternative function; especially with a Vise Grip.

F
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« Reply #59 on: October 25, 2007, 06:13:14 PM »

I'd have to vote the vise grip as one of the most useful multi-function tools ever. They can do anything.
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