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Author Topic: Philosophy of making a run  (Read 4622 times)

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Offline Eddieschopshop

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2018, 10:55:26 AM »
I got to make the 300 line this year!  One of my personal lsr goals,


  I thought you just had to make a run over 300 to get in the 300 line.

  Do you have to hold a record over 300?

        JL222

Yes just a run,  but then fill out parperwork to get "approved"  Its all very official and stuff

Offline SPARKY

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2018, 11:36:10 AM »
"I'll say that I have as much respect for those who run and aren't competitive as those who are competitive because at least they're out there running. " Well said Mike---- Absolutely
Miss LIBERTY,  changing TKI  to noise, dust and RUST!!!

The # 1 issue is: TO KEEP THE REPUBLIC      
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"Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."   Helen Keller

Offline wobblywalrus

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2018, 10:34:59 AM »
The bike and me have almost no chance to set records anymore.  Both of us are slow and obsolete.  The class I race in is FIM.  It is expensive and the paperwork and medical exams are a pain in the butt.  The problem is, we need participants to subsidize the cost of FIM participation and this is needed for a world record event.  There are not a lot of FIM riders.  So, running in FIM, with no real chance of a record is my way of contributing to the sport.

Offline Ian Northeast

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #18 on: October 21, 2018, 06:00:26 AM »
I came into motorsport quite late in life, but as with all things in life there is always someone out there with more, be it money, talent or whatever. As a result I have never attempted to be competitive in any of my endeavours. All I have looked for is the maximum enjoyment for the effort I have put in.
I am not a successful racer in fact I get better value for money on track than others, I'm out there longer!
However my one enduring dream was to race my car at Bonneville. If I had not been able to run because I couldn't afford to be competitive then I would have missed out on one of the best experiences of my life.
Competing at Bonneville is an honour and priviledge and the fact that they just let anyone turn up and give it a go is what makes it so. To build a car and then find out how fast I could make it go, was all I ever wanted. I could have gone faster if I just bought a modern really fast car. However I got to 148mph in a car that is older than me, with it's original chassis, body and engine.
The challenge always was the engineering never the record breaking.

Offline DRW

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2018, 10:15:03 PM »
I agree, I look at Bonneville as a Privilege, For me to be able to run there, Where The Breedloves ,Vescos & Thompsons once ran Just Blows My mind , I happen to have a Bike that can do maybe 160s in a 207mph record class, Am I gonna pass because my bike cant get close to that record, No Way, Im gonna run as fast as I possibly can, But im also gonna be respectful of what I do and How I go about it,Im gonna be ready when going thru tech,Im gonna be suited and buttoned up when the flag man waves that green flag, And Im gonna turn off and have the lane ready for the next guy ASAP, And Im gonna go to that Booth and get my slip and walk away with pride, Even though I feel like jumping up in the air and screaming how Dodge happy I am to have just pulled off a run on that same exact salt as The Legends !
Doesnt Mean That Much To me, To Mean That Much To You !

Offline QikNip

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2019, 12:18:15 PM »
I grew up reading of Bonneville and of its more notable competitors, so like most here, being on the salt was a bucket list item for me. The place is simply awe inspiring and assuming others feel as I do in the regard, running for a record, running period, or just being there is special. To that point I want to relate a story … Last year the team who'd been in line in front of us pulled up to get their time slip and the team erupted into a cheer that could only signify a record. When I spoke to them, they reported that they'd broken 100 (on a ~130) record. They were simply overjoyed to have run and to have finally hit the century mark. So I say all are equally welcome and deserving of respect.  :cheers:
138.0 G/CPRO 4/18 Arkansas Mile Challenge Record
145.632 G/CPRO 8/17 Bonneville Record
149.825 G/CPRO 8/18 Bonneville Record

Offline Speed Limit 1000

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2019, 07:30:09 PM »
Nathan :cheers:
John Gowetski, red hat @ 221.183 MPH MSA Lakester, Bockscar #1000 60 ci normally aspirated w/N20

Offline MAYOMAN

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2019, 08:01:50 AM »
When I was a high school kid in a hot rod club (Igniters Auto Club of Chicago) we always asked “How fast will it go?” Being in Illinois, we would try to find out on the country roads. The speed limit in Illinois then was “reasonable and proper”. We sometimes found out how dangerous “reasonable and proper” could be on country roads. We lost a few friends coming home from the Wisconsin  (18 years drinking age) beer bars on those 2-lane country roads.
We read about those California hot rodders who found out “how fast will it go?” on the dry lakes. Later, we read about the hot rodders out west learning “how fast will it go?” at the Bonneville Salt Flats. That is the spirit behind the Bonneville Nationals, SCTA, USFRA, and its competitors. First, “How fast will it go?”, then can it go faster? If it is only about records there would be shorter lines. Every speed enthusiast should be welcome in those long lines waiting to find out “How fast will it go?”
 :cheers:
The road is long - Life is short - Drive fast

Offline Seldom Seen Slim

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2019, 08:16:23 AM »
I've had this on the front fenders of my pickups for years:

"Didn't you ever want to open 'er up wide open and see what she'll do?"
I show it to folks who ask why we do this stuff.
Jon E. Wennerberg
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 (that's way up north)
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Owner of landracing.com

Offline Stainless1

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2019, 08:32:13 AM »
Ahh, Philosophy . . . the academic's bench-racing.

In my case, it's not about me - it's about the car.

The only reason I had a record in my name is because the fellow I wanted to have drive it couldn't attend the event.

For me, it's about building the vehicle to take on the record.

I raced at Bonneville for 22 years... before I made my first pass... getting there, being part of it is a very cool deal.  It is on a lot of gearhead's bucket list to just attend... we are the folks that are doing it and keeping it going.  
It is human nature to want to win... but it is also human nature to want to be part of something bigger... every runner cannot win the Boston Marathon... but they all try and talk about doing it...
Racing Bonneville is like that... we all want to win, or at least try, even if we know it will only be our personal best... it tests you and your machine... getting the best from both  :wink:
 
The USFRA has made it possible for anyone with a car or bike to make a pass via the 130 MPH Club... I encourage all to try that... there are no records, just gaining entry to the Club... and your chance to run on the world famous Bonneville Salt Flats on the cheap.  
It is a gateway to the affliction....  :cheers:

 
Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.

Offline PorkPie

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2019, 01:17:17 PM »
Stainless,

it was 30 years for me, when you guys from the Bockscar Team gave me the opportunity to race a car.....and if you have the luck as I had....you could go home with a record...

Your try was, to get me into the record book and into the 200 Club.....my first record was 199,665 mph....(the exclusive 199,5 + Club)....but no Red Hat.....

we done this a couple weeks later.....

but I still like my 199 record more....as this record was my FIRST record....what a day in my life....

Thanks again to the Bockscar Team to get me this chance.... :-D


Ahh, Philosophy . . . the academic's bench-racing.

In my case, it's not about me - it's about the car.

The only reason I had a record in my name is because the fellow I wanted to have drive it couldn't attend the event.

For me, it's about building the vehicle to take on the record.

I raced at Bonneville for 22 years... before I made my first pass... getting there, being part of it is a very cool deal.  It is on a lot of gearhead's bucket list to just attend... we are the folks that are doing it and keeping it going.  
It is human nature to want to win... but it is also human nature to want to be part of something bigger... every runner cannot win the Boston Marathon... but they all try and talk about doing it...
Racing Bonneville is like that... we all want to win, or at least try, even if we know it will only be our personal best... it tests you and your machine... getting the best from both  :wink:
 
The USFRA has made it possible for anyone with a car or bike to make a pass via the 130 MPH Club... I encourage all to try that... there are no records, just gaining entry to the Club... and your chance to run on the world famous Bonneville Salt Flats on the cheap.  
It is a gateway to the affliction....  :cheers:

 
Pork Pie

Photoartist & Historian & 200 MPH Club Member

Offline Speed Limit 1000

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2019, 07:02:48 PM »
Brother Thomas,
I remember from your rookie run to your record run how fast you progressed and how hard you worked to get to the next license. I am sure that the newcomers would enjoy the story of your journey.         
Be happy safe and fast. :cheers:

Johnboy  
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 07:04:27 PM by Speed Limit 1000 »
John Gowetski, red hat @ 221.183 MPH MSA Lakester, Bockscar #1000 60 ci normally aspirated w/N20

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2019, 06:49:52 AM »
Brother Thomas,
I remember from your rookie run to your record run how fast you progressed and how hard you worked to get to the next license.

I for one would love to read that story - Rookie to Record; A Newbies Twisted Tail.

When you sell the rights; who will you cast as you in the film version?

Lemming John
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Seldom Seen Slim

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #28 on: January 14, 2019, 06:56:42 AM »
Yeah, but with Pork Pie it's the backstory that adds to the legend.  We need to make sure we include his younger days, too. :cheers:
Jon E. Wennerberg
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Offline Stainless1

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Re: Philosophy of making a run
« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2019, 09:06:52 AM »
Well kids if you want to read the printed version, check Fast Facts magazine... I think that comes from your backyard John... Pork Pie did an article about his quest for them.

I know it does not include the  number times I asked him if he was done and went as fast as he wanted to...  :-o
That came when I was trying to convince Pork Pie that revving the motor to just short of the limiter was necessary and he didn't need to worry about the motor's survival...
if he wanted to set a record.    :cheers:
Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.