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Author Topic: UK Lakester build G/GL  (Read 44538 times)

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Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #345 on: April 29, 2019, 05:38:29 AM »
Passing through the firewall is also the push / pull throttle cable. To be 'out of the way' it took a rather awkward curve to get to the throttle bodies and that added stiction. I have therefore added a bellcrank (with oilite bushes) attached to the engine mount bracketry which was conveniently in the right place.

I have return springs on all four TBs (on the spindle) but will add a simple linear one to the bellcrank to pull it home directly in line with the cable.
I need to mount the cable at the engine end and put a throttle stop on the pedal and that is another section of the rule book checked off.
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #346 on: May 09, 2019, 02:57:13 AM »
I remade the switch panel to incorporate a circuit for the battery cut out (solid state relay).
A larger blue switch will be mounted for external shut off.

In the process I had a play with vinyl letters - more a vanity project than something really practial but its nice to finish something and box it up.

The instrument pod will have two small red push butttons accesible with hands on the wheel (left or right hand both served) to fire the chute solenoid. As these could be brushed fitting the wheel getting in it seemed prudent to have a seperate rocker switch to arm the circuit. There will be a secondary (cable) chute release too; that is on the list of things to design / locate in the cockpit.
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #347 on: May 28, 2019, 09:36:22 AM »
I have finalised the mechanical ejector seat chute release mechanism. This is the backup to switches on the instrument pod.

There is a central roll structure tube running under the floor and so this bracketry was made to mount to that with the handle coming through the floor and sitting between the thighs - it is a completely natural action to pull it towards you (rather than up) - possibly a reflex action protecting ones nether parts - as such the handle arcs with the mechanism.

I think the cockpit is now only missing the extinguisher firing mechanism (lever / button / whatever) so I can now remake the 'floor' with the correct openings and close the cockpit chapter for now.
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #348 on: May 28, 2019, 09:53:05 AM »
The other project this weekend (I love it when they make me stay home on a Monday) was the airbox. I purchased a blank one with a shallow backplate.

It was close to fitting inside the body line but it needed a slice out of the backplate to angle it down slightly - I have just under a 1/2" of clearance.

I also started mocking up the 5" inlet tube.
4" is a standard airbox inlet - comments welcome - this engine will be high revving, naturally aspirated and hopefully making some reasonable power at the top end.

This meant further mods to the backplate but the tube will feed around 95% of its surface area unimpeded. 5" is a UK standard for ducting (clothes dryers, cooker hoods etc) so the plastic duct joiner is an ideal basis to pattern the inlet.

Lots of slicing and fibreglassing done with a lot more to follow to wrap this up.
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Stainless1

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #349 on: May 28, 2019, 11:03:50 AM »
Hopefully no one will bump that when the are checking your belts at the start line.... Of course I always recommend chute deployment without removing a hand from the wheel...
Hope you never need to know why  :cheers:
Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.

Offline kiwi belly tank

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #350 on: May 28, 2019, 12:45:05 PM »
If you haven't already, put a safety on the chute release to prevent premature ejeculation. :-D
  Sid.

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #351 on: May 29, 2019, 07:59:52 AM »
Sid - I initially thought that was a typo then realised it was a very good pun.  :cheers:

Stainless, Sid

The primary chute release will be a boot (trunk) release solenoid activated by a little red button on the instrument pod - two in fact, one for the left hand and one for the right - that would allow a lefty to have a drive. These can be triggered with hands on the wheel. I have an isolation switch on the 'dash' which arms that circuit once in and belted as part of the startup routine.

The ejeculate handle was a humourous (?) item sourced from a 1970's jet (still in its original Martin Baker packaging) for the required mechanical backup, and especially if ones hands are not in the straight ahead it will be an omg moment anyway so reaching between your legs will be natural.

I had not considered that someone might 'catch' this when cinching the belts up and need to explore further. I am assuming the chute end of the vehicle will have a pre-flight pin - I guess the crew show that to the driver before closing the canopy so maybe thats the security step, engage that in such a way that the chute release cable can't be withdrawn with that pin in so the chute cover stays in place regardless.
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline kiwi belly tank

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #352 on: May 29, 2019, 09:41:54 AM »
There's been a lot of chutes deployed on the startline over the years.
Way back in the early 90's the Vesco liner had rocket launcher's, we were in line right behind them strapping Al into his claustrophobic bullet when one of those things went by. That was a holly $hit moment! :-o
  Sid.

Offline Stainless1

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #353 on: May 29, 2019, 10:58:22 AM »
Sid.... that was probably when they used shotgun blanks to deploy...  somewhere in my old pre-digital pics I have a picture of the old double barrell shotgun Don mounted back there to fire the chutes out.
Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.

Offline kiwi belly tank

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #354 on: May 30, 2019, 07:16:49 AM »
It was definitely a wizzer as it went by not a banger but holy shotgun shells Batman, that'd be interesting at close range! :cry:
  Sid.

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #355 on: June 18, 2019, 04:19:29 PM »
Fun with fibreglass. It releases very easily off the lightly waxed pvc duct pipe (male pattern) but I was lazy with the fibreglass mould taken off that and had to do a little bit of filler and a coat of paint on the resultant 5" f'glass inlet grafted onto the airbox.

Just waiting for the rad in tank to be finished to finalise the motor position then I can work up the chassis rear of he firewall.

A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #356 on: June 19, 2019, 04:15:03 PM »
NACA noodling one

Thinking about packaging of the inlet ducting from the body inlet to the airbox.

The crude elevation sketches below are per Staniforth (Race and Rally Car Source Book) with a flat ramp floor at 5-11 degrees.
I came across another mathematical model for NACA that results in a curved ramp floor (front to back) that looks a bit like the 's' curve sides of a NACA in plan, but flatter.

What are the pros and cons?
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Lemming Motors

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #357 on: June 19, 2019, 04:24:17 PM »
NACA noodling two

All the modelling I have seen of a NACA shows the body / fuselage surface as flat where the duct is mounted though on most aircraft the fuselage would be curved, probably in both directions.

Assuming that it is mounted on the side and there is a gentle curve (exaggerated in the crude sketches below);

The rear lip will obviously follow the curve but what about the ramp floor in end elevation. If it should be flat then should the ramp sides be at 90 degrees to the floor (pic a) or the body surface (pic c)?
If they should b at 90 degrees to both the body surface and the floor to work efficiently that would require the ramp floor to follow the curve of the body surface in end elevation (pic b)?

 :|
« Last Edit: June 21, 2019, 08:49:38 AM by bobc »
A Bonneville Lakester please barman.
Certainly sir; a lick of salt, a sip of gas and a twist of Lemming. More Lemming sir?
Just a squeeze.

A Squeeze of Lemming it is sir.

Offline Rex Schimmer

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Re: UK Lakester build G/GL
« Reply #358 on: June 21, 2019, 06:12:31 PM »
I would go with your "A" concept. Easiest to build and provides good vertical surface to expand the two vortices that go down each side. Next to the cut out shape (plan view) the next most important thing is that the junction of the vertical side wall and the body surface be a sharp corner, this is important to form the vortex on each side that makes the NACA duct work.

Rex
Rex

Not much matters and the rest doesn't matter at all.

Offline Speed Limit 1000

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John Gowetski, red hat @ 221.183 MPH MSA Lakester, Bockscar #1000 60 ci normally aspirated w/N20