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Author Topic: Running coolant lines through passenger compartment in steel tubing?  (Read 3758 times)
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revolutionary
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« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2017, 12:27:16 PM »

You mean like this... coolant and fuel hoses through the steel tube and exhaust pipe with header wrap under the stainless shield


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SteveM
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« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2017, 04:37:45 PM »

You mean like this... coolant and fuel hoses through the steel tube and exhaust pipe with header wrap under the stainless shield




Yes, like that!  Very nice work there.

Steve.
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ggl205
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« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2017, 09:55:03 AM »

Where in the rule book does it say you can't run coolant lines through the cockpit? There are lots of roadsters with the coolant tank adjacent to the driver.

The only place in a 2016 rule book that requires a watertight and flame resistant barrier is at the firewall (3F). Nothing in the book states water lines cannot run through the driver compartment. All fuel system components are to be "isolated" from the driver compartment (3I). So, how is one to interpret "isolated" for fuel lines? Will splash shields do if not required to be watertight? I was told that even stainless steel braided hose and AN fittings are not enough. These lines and fittings must also be "isolated" from the driver. The reason was if one of these components fails in a crash, fuel may find its way to the driver. I am still a little fuzzy on this because in a crash, stuff goes everywhere, including the open sections of the driver compartment. Are we to "isolate" the driver completely? I don't think that was the intent of rule makers so maybe simple shielding will be acceptable. Comments, please.

John
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kiwi belly tank
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« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2017, 10:35:50 AM »

Steve, since you're running a turbo diesel with a swillion lb's of boost, you run the risk of shoving that into the cooling system via a head gasket failure. What ever you do, allow for that scenario.
  Sid.
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SteveM
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« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2017, 03:28:35 PM »

Steve, since you're running a turbo diesel with a swillion lb's of boost, you run the risk of shoving that into the cooling system via a head gasket failure. What ever you do, allow for that scenario.
  Sid.

Good thinking.  For this year, I'm staying with a conventional radiator in front (no water-to-water heat exchanger in the bed).  That may come later, but I need to be careful with allocating my time at this point.

So far, on the 2 occasions where I have lost control of where the swillion pounds of boost are going, it has only resulted in blowing all the oil out of the crankcase, a couple of melted pistons, 2 ruined cylinder heads, a ruined turbo, and a bunch of other expensive stuff that I've blanked out of my mind.

Steve.
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Peter Jack
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« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2017, 04:00:28 PM »

Steve, since you're running a turbo diesel with a swillion lb's of boost, you run the risk of shoving that into the cooling system via a head gasket failure. What ever you do, allow for that scenario.
  Sid.

Good thinking.  For this year, I'm staying with a conventional radiator in front (no water-to-water heat exchanger in the bed).  That may come later, but I need to be careful with allocating my time at this point.

So far, on the 2 occasions where I have lost control of where the swillion pounds of boost are going, it has only resulted in blowing all the oil out of the crankcase, a couple of melted pistons, 2 ruined cylinder heads, a ruined turbo, and a bunch of other expensive stuff that I've blanked out of my mind.

Steve.


The sign of a true racer Steve. Well done.  cheers cheers cheers

Pete
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NathanStewart
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« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2017, 07:20:40 PM »

^^^ lol

isolate means keep away from as in not be in.  so, there shouldn't be any fuel lines in the drivers compartment.  pretty easy.  coolant lines are NOT restricted from being in the driver's compartment.  original roadster i drove had water tank immediately behind the driver with normal rubber radiator hoses - never a problem.  current roadster has radiator in a tank right next to me and has coolant lines running through driver's compartment.  again, no problems.  rule book gives min safety requirements.  you can build beyond what the rules require.
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ggl205
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« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2017, 08:44:43 PM »

^^^ lol

isolate means keep away from as in not be in.  so, there shouldn't be any fuel lines in the drivers compartment.  pretty easy.  coolant lines are NOT restricted from being in the driver's compartment.  original roadster i drove had water tank immediately behind the driver with normal rubber radiator hoses - never a problem.  current roadster has radiator in a tank right next to me and has coolant lines running through driver's compartment.  again, no problems.  rule book gives min safety requirements.  you can build beyond what the rules require.

Got it but my steel braided fuel lines do not run in or through the driver compartment but there are two small areas where the braided hose does run by but outside an un-shielded part of the footbox. So, the fuel lines are not in the driver compartment and are kept apart from it. Because these lines are not shielded from the driver compartment at these two small areas, it was suggested it may not pass tech.

John
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Billy @ AHG
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« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2017, 12:08:26 PM »

The statement " you can build beyond what the rules require" is valid, however there is a clinker in the fact that it can't give a performance advantage, weather real or imagined, This is up to the discretion of the inspectors .
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Salt Junkie
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