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Author Topic: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.  (Read 125906 times)

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Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #75 on: July 28, 2015, 08:17:36 AM »
A few more different angles.

I need a few more plates and tubing to finish.

I also need instruction on mig welding (tacking) the Aluminum.
My last experience was a disaster.

Online Peter Jack

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #76 on: July 28, 2015, 08:40:48 AM »
"I also need instruction on mig welding (tacking) the Aluminum."

Don't. The tacks will be too large and too cold for the tig to cover them. You should be able to tig tack them just fine. The trick with starting a good tig weld, especially on aluminum, is to start slowly and build the heat at the start gradually before you actually start to melt the metal. Get both sides of the weld puddled before you add any filler. Add a little filler and you have a tack. Continue adding filler and you have a weld. To make a nice aluminum weld be a little patient.  :-D :-D :-D

Of course, aluminum is welded with AC current and high frequency plus a little higher flow on the shielding gas.

Pete
« Last Edit: July 28, 2015, 08:42:40 AM by Peter Jack »

Offline fordboy628

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #77 on: July 28, 2015, 01:37:01 PM »
"I also need instruction on mig welding (tacking) the Aluminum."

Don't. The tacks will be too large and too cold for the tig to cover them. You should be able to tig tack them just fine. The trick with starting a good tig weld, especially on aluminum, is to start slowly and build the heat at the start gradually before you actually start to melt the metal. Get both sides of the weld puddled before you add any filler. Add a little filler and you have a tack. Continue adding filler and you have a weld. To make a nice aluminum weld be a little patient.  :-D :-D :-D

Of course, aluminum is welded with AC current and high frequency plus a little higher flow on the shielding gas.

Pete

Mike,

Pete's advice is spot on.

 :cheers:
Science, NOT Magic . . . .

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Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #78 on: July 29, 2015, 03:58:48 AM »
Pete, I don't have access to an AC tig welding machine here.
My tacks need to be mig and then the part will go to the real welder.

Offline SPARKY

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #79 on: July 29, 2015, 08:37:26 AM »
do you have gas welding?
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Online Peter Jack

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #80 on: July 29, 2015, 09:38:19 AM »
Pete, I don't have access to an AC tig welding machine here.
My tacks need to be mig and then the part will go to the real welder.

Mike, in that case preheat the whole area where you're going to tack so it's at least sizzling hot before you make the mig tacks. They'll penetrate much better even if you make the tacks smaller (good). If possible leave the manifold on the jig for as much welding as you can.

Pete

Online Peter Jack

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #81 on: July 29, 2015, 09:46:11 AM »
do you have gas welding?

Sparky, the oxy/acetylene process, while it's great for aluminum body work, would be very difficult to use for someone not practiced in the process. You're dealing with two very different thicknesses of material and some awkward positioning. The oxy/acetylene on the other hand will be the perfect tool for achieving adequate preheat. The trick is to spread the heat out evenly and not concentrate in a small area. A small rosebud tip would probably be a good choice. The amount of heat required to achieve tacking temperatures with gas would likely lead to serious distortion.

Pete
« Last Edit: July 29, 2015, 09:47:42 AM by Peter Jack »

Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #82 on: July 30, 2015, 01:49:52 AM »
Thanks Pete. :cheers:

That's great advice. I have a roll of Aluminum wire and the last time I tried running a bead or two
all I got was lousy welds and my mask covered in white soot.
I went with Guido's advice and just gave up.

A few months back I went with him to install the exact same machine I have at a client.
They guys were also struggling a bit so Guido suggested I have a go. I laid down the best
mig weld I've ever done. No smoke, good penetration and if you didn't know better you'd have
thought it was a tig weld.

I don't know what made the difference but I have read up on advice. Someone suggested using a larger tip
eg a 1mm tip for ,8mm wire and not to tighten the feeder system as tightly as one would for steel.

Maybe I had the gas flow too high as well before?.

I'll do some tests before tacking. I'll make sure all the parts are securely bolted down before I start.

I'll post pics of the tests before I get really brave.

Sparky, I have gas welding equipment but never tried it. I leave that to the pros but thanks anyway.

Online Peter Jack

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #83 on: July 30, 2015, 06:11:49 AM »
Get a scrap piece of aluminum and start running stringer beads. I run in the area of 18 to 20 cfm of argon. Don't be afraid to make bold moves until you start to close in on what you want. The fillets will definitely take more heat than your practice stringers on the flat but you'll be close.

Pete

Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #84 on: July 30, 2015, 11:56:48 AM »
Thanks Pete. I'll let you know how I progress.

 I guess tomorrow is D day.

I won't give up until I ace this thing.

I've gotten around a few poke checking defensemen before. :-D :-D :-D

Offline SPARKY

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #85 on: July 30, 2015, 12:08:25 PM »
Professionals use a conventional commercial gas oven to heat the stuff

Self racing does a batch of 4 ---they have a 3 door Wolf oven---3 are heating--- one is being welded on --a little at a time---then back to the oven  pull a hot one out and put this one in---repeat as necessary until all are DONE  :-D--
Miss LIBERTY,  changing T.K.I.  to noise, dust and RUST!!!

The # 1 issue is: TO KEEP THE REPUBLIC      
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Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #86 on: July 30, 2015, 10:37:15 PM »
Thanks Sparky. :cheers:

Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #87 on: July 30, 2015, 11:17:21 PM »
Does anyone maybe have a drawing of weld in bungs for Bosch injectors?.

I need to turn a set on the lathe. :roll:

Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #88 on: August 04, 2015, 12:16:15 AM »
Left side of welding jig drilled and anchor nuts welded in.

Offline tauruck

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Re: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.
« Reply #89 on: December 26, 2015, 07:10:36 AM »
I've posted on my build diary that I'm fabricating a Carbon Fiber Plenum for the motor.

There are quite a few high pressure vessels like Nos and dive tanks being manufactured
and I'm using similar techniques in the construction process.

By the time the plenum is done there will be about 14 layers of Carbon, Kevlar and Glass fiber
on the part. Probably the stoutest part I'll ever make.

My turbo guys say we'll be going to 2Bar boost so obviously the piece will have to be pressure
tested to at least 3Bar.

Herein lies the problem. Bolting on a quick release fitting and using the compressor to gradually
build up pressure is the route I'll have to take but if it fails at any point my thinking is that it will
have the same effect as an IED!!!!.

I was going to submerge the plenum in a 40 gallon plastic container but there's a whole lot wrong
with the idea IMO.

I can submerge the plenum in Ian's swimming pool and see what happens.

What do you guys think?.

I built an airbox for a 510 Sonny Leonard Nos EFI BBC and the customer had a backfire.
The end result wasn't pretty but the part wasn't meant to be a pressure vessel.

I'm worried even though I have faith in my work and I know you guys won't steer me in the wrong direction. :| :| :| :|