Landracing Forum Home
December 14, 2018, 04:31:02 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
BACK TO LANDRACING.COM HOMEPAGE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  


(Note: Donations are not tax deductible)







Live Audio Streaming and Archives of Past Events
Next Live Event: TBD
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Solo to Sidecar by STD  (Read 69588 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Nortonist 592
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Riverside CA.
Posts: 1508



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #45 on: October 21, 2013, 11:13:49 PM »

I hate the thought of wasting an aluminum sheet trying to make it anything but flat.
Logged

Get off the stove Grandad.  You're too old to be riding the range.
Peter Jack
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3551





Ignore
« Reply #46 on: October 21, 2013, 11:35:11 PM »

For sidecar road racing the sidecar spindle between 10 to 12 inches lead (ahead) of the rear wheel spindle (on a front engine sidecar, other specs on modern rear engine sidecars) ......However, for LSR (only straight line) 12 to 15 inches has worked well for us..................Remember, as per rules if you run a passenger you need a sidecar fender ....and a handhold other then the sidecar mounting tubing.......Also the minimum of 32 inches track is measured from center of rear tire to center of sidecar tire........................Have fun..............

This handy information has been added to my reference files. Thanks Bob!  cheers cheers cheers

Pete
Logged
Bruin
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Topeka KS
Posts: 246


Just makin doo.




Ignore
« Reply #47 on: October 22, 2013, 02:03:15 AM »

I envy glass skills and the knowledge to apply them but barring a generous glasser moving in next door, I will have to go by our team motto, and my personal belief, make do with what you have. I am thinking long and hard about using the stainless. I suppose I could wear gloves and roll the edges so they would not be sharp but there is a second consideration. Some of the bike is already sheathed in aluminum and when you mate different materials like aluminum and steel there is a galvanic reaction. It can be negated by insulating the seams where they meet but sticking to one or the other seems appropriate. I will say that with an extra grunt the stainless steel does bend to one's will.
Logged

STD; Speed Team Doo
'82 Honda 500 APS-AF
'70 Triumph 250 MPS-PG
'71 Triumph 250 APS-PF
'70 Triumph 250 M-PG
DND
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Location: Granada Hills Ca.
Posts: 395





Ignore
« Reply #48 on: October 22, 2013, 06:29:11 AM »

Hi Briun

You are taking the term. ' Rear Sets ' to a new level or should I say distance

Neat project

G Don
Logged
Bruin
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Topeka KS
Posts: 246


Just makin doo.




Ignore
« Reply #49 on: October 24, 2013, 11:13:13 AM »

I conferred with a sheet metal guy (neighbor) and learned there are more than a few tricks to working with stainless steel. Like, you can't let it get hot, even the heat of drilling a hole, or it gets brittle. Not good news if you can't weld and have to drill and rivet aplenty. So I displayed my best whipped puppy face and he is going to hook me up with some aluminum for the body.
Logged

STD; Speed Team Doo
'82 Honda 500 APS-AF
'70 Triumph 250 MPS-PG
'71 Triumph 250 APS-PF
'70 Triumph 250 M-PG
manta22
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 80
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 3248


What, me worry?




Ignore
« Reply #50 on: October 25, 2013, 12:08:16 PM »

I conferred with a sheet metal guy (neighbor) and learned there are more than a few tricks to working with stainless steel. Like, you can't let it get hot, even the heat of drilling a hole, or it gets brittle. Not good news if you can't weld and have to drill and rivet aplenty. So I displayed my best whipped puppy face and he is going to hook me up with some aluminum for the body.

I think your neighbor was pulling your leg.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
Logged

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 65
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4782





Ignore
« Reply #51 on: October 25, 2013, 08:42:37 PM »

Aluminum.  The wonder metal.

The book "The Racing Motorcycle" Volume 2, has a lot of info about metal alloys, their properties, handling and working, etc.  Just like all metals, it is worth it to know the alloy and temper you are using. This way, when you find something you like, you know what to order for next time.

The basic 0.020 thick sheets from Ace Hardware are easy to work, anneal OK, and get nice and tough after work hardening.  They are from the 2000 series and they do pit from salt corrosion.  That is the only problem I have had with them.
Logged
Bruin
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Topeka KS
Posts: 246


Just makin doo.




Ignore
« Reply #52 on: October 25, 2013, 09:54:32 PM »

I didn't realize sheet aluminum could be annealed. I just looked it up, rub it with bar soap, torch it till the soap chars, and bend it like chewing gum. I'm interested in giving this a try. Is forming it enough to work harden?
Logged

STD; Speed Team Doo
'82 Honda 500 APS-AF
'70 Triumph 250 MPS-PG
'71 Triumph 250 APS-PF
'70 Triumph 250 M-PG
Nortonist 592
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Riverside CA.
Posts: 1508



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #53 on: October 25, 2013, 10:39:44 PM »

I've been told that after annealing it forms a lot easier but I've never tried it.  I've also been told it work hardens.  Me?  I'll stick with 'glass.  It doesn't work harden and as I have no skill I find it easier to work.  When you start this project please post lots of photos. 
Logged

Get off the stove Grandad.  You're too old to be riding the range.
Peter Jack
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3551





Ignore
« Reply #54 on: October 25, 2013, 10:51:37 PM »

If you're annealing it with oxy/acetylene all you do is blacken it with an acetylene rich flame and then burn the black off with a neutral flame. Be gentle with the latter or you're likely to melt the aluminum. The aluminum will be soft after this treatment. When you work the aluminum some more it will harden again and you can re-anneal it. I've used this method when forming tank ends from 6061 aluminum. It works.

Pete
Logged
Bruin
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Topeka KS
Posts: 246


Just makin doo.




Ignore
« Reply #55 on: October 25, 2013, 11:38:59 PM »

Do you know if it will work with a home butane torch? (Tools at hand.)
Logged

STD; Speed Team Doo
'82 Honda 500 APS-AF
'70 Triumph 250 MPS-PG
'71 Triumph 250 APS-PF
'70 Triumph 250 M-PG
Peter Jack
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3551





Ignore
« Reply #56 on: October 25, 2013, 11:43:46 PM »

Unfortunately I don't. I have the oxy/acetylene at hand. I would try it on fairly light material in a relatively small area to see if it can be achieved. Good luck!

Pete
Logged
tauruck
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: N/A
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 4770





Ignore
« Reply #57 on: October 25, 2013, 11:54:24 PM »

I've been told that after annealing it forms a lot easier but I've never tried it.  I've also been told it work hardens.  Me?  I'll stick with 'glass.  It doesn't work harden and as I have no skill I find it easier to work.  When you start this project please post lots of photos. 
That's why I got into glass in the beginning. Very few tools required and you can make mistakes without too much of a backlash. The metals are all great and I love them but I think Bruin might battle a bit having limited experience and not having a lot of metal working tools. My experience is that he'll find he needs more and more equipment as the job progresses. Bruin, take the simplest route on this one. Believe me and beware of neighbors. They're not always what they're cracked up to be.  grin
Bruin, listen to Nortonist.
Logged

Bruin
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Topeka KS
Posts: 246


Just makin doo.




Ignore
« Reply #58 on: October 26, 2013, 01:39:17 AM »

When you talk about glass, are you talking about building a positive and negative form for the fairing? I would not have a clue how to proceed. I'm thinking it would take time and skill and you would need shop room and no small amount of supplies. For aluminum, I just make trial patterns out of cardboard, cut, bend, and rivet. I've got zippo room, no heat, and with winter arriving, cure times for glass would be brutal. Don't get me wrong, a nice glass fairing would be far superior to what I can bend, but like Dirty Harry once said, "A man's got to know his limitations." And heck, I'm in it for the fun of doing something challenging and perhaps creative... within my amateur skill set... and my expectations are low. I'll take pictures of the effort.

And guys, I do appreciate all the tips.
Logged

STD; Speed Team Doo
'82 Honda 500 APS-AF
'70 Triumph 250 MPS-PG
'71 Triumph 250 APS-PF
'70 Triumph 250 M-PG
tauruck
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: N/A
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 4770





Ignore
« Reply #59 on: October 26, 2013, 03:02:43 AM »

We understand. You'll get it right one way or another. cheers
Logged

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page September 24, 2018, 03:54:12 AM