Author Topic: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build  (Read 595529 times)

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Offline tauruck

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #870 on: February 14, 2015, 02:24:37 AM »
We do but not like when I played.
Pro in the 70s. Our currency was stronger than the Dollar
so guess where a bunch of Canadians, Austrians, Swiss, Finns, Swedes and others
spent their off season keeping fit?.

I managed a rink in 1980 so I used to take the Zamboni out for a spin.
Lousy gear ratios though. :-D :-D :-D

Offline Mobacken Racing

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #871 on: February 15, 2015, 10:53:10 AM »
I just did the final test before the race, everything went well except for a blown oil pump fuse during the first startup. I am glad that I have the Hobbs switch since it shut the fuel pump down immediately.

http://youtu.be/x37ez8nCDCo

Not a drop of oil came out when I opened the engine drain plug, I will investigate where the smoke comes from later.



Happy happy! :)

Offline Seldom Seen Slim

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #872 on: February 15, 2015, 11:09:23 AM »
Gee-zul-MAN!  How exciting.  I sure wish I was going to be there to see the ice racing in general and this bike in particular. :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

But I've gotta say it -- about testing the bike without a shield over the (spinning) rear tire.  With those studs - and the forces caused by the spinning of the wheel -- weren't you concerned that it's start the party by throwing one of the pointy things at you?  Or are they installed in some manner (that I can't understand) so they cannot come loose and puncture anything that's nearby?
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Offline Stainless1

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #873 on: February 15, 2015, 11:37:20 AM »
Jon, the rear fender would need to be 1/4 thick to slow one of those bullets, so it probably wouldn't matter if it was in place or not. 
Cool test, I wouldn't worry too much about the smoke, my guess is a little residual oil from the last run slipped past the seal.  It appeared the smoke was short lived.  Great video... wish it had subtitles, my Swedish it way worse than your English
Have fun, be safe (as possible racing motorcycles on ice with spiked tires), and go fast
Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.

Offline Mobacken Racing

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #874 on: February 15, 2015, 03:59:04 PM »
Jon: The spikes are in fact pointy M6 bolts that are pushed through the tyre from the inside with washers and nyloc nuts, in order to come loose the spike would have to tear the washer right through the tyre cord.

I know a guy with a 500 hp Hayabusa who yanked the throttle a bit with the bike on the stand and at a high gear a couple of years ago at the race, the tyre tore apart from the forces and made a mess of the whole bike. Very stupid thing to do and without a replacement tyre (and all the electronics that were placed under the passenger seat) he had to call it a day without doing a single run that weekend... :-(

Stainless1: Most of the smoke is from the oil jet lubrication in the gearbox that slips past the shat seal and into the exhaust pipe, I could reduce the oil flow to the gearbox but that would risk running a bearing dry so I think I have to live with some smoke. Will check in on it later after the race is over and I have more time for R&D.

Thanks, my goal is to go 200km/h which is trickier than it might sound since the spiked tyres cause lots of drag. :-)

Cheers!
/Anders


Offline grumm441

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #875 on: February 16, 2015, 04:07:36 AM »
This is pretty gross
but as I recall towing motorcycles was banned after a serious accident
this is Wink Eller, doing some repairs to himself after an accident
No free healthcare in the USA
G

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnG5i4IUB8c
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Offline Gu11ett

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #876 on: February 16, 2015, 08:12:18 AM »
The video of Wink stitching himself up is from knocking his shin against a bolt on his trailer. It had nothing to do with towing his bike.

Offline grumm441

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #877 on: February 16, 2015, 03:25:42 PM »
The video of Wink stitching himself up is from knocking his shin against a bolt on his trailer. It had nothing to do with towing his bike.

Didn't say it was
It certainly shows Wink isn't afraid of needles
G
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Offline Mobacken Racing

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #878 on: February 17, 2015, 08:35:24 AM »
During the run I noticed that the two exhaust temp gauges behaved very different to each other, so last night I did some experimentation with different thermocouple arrangements, I made a test chamber from a steel tube that I heated with a propane torch to get the same environment for both temp probes.



As a reference I used a hand held unit with a Fluke thermocouple, I tested it against the analogue gauge with its original thermocouple, the analogue gauge with a Fluke thermocouple, and a digital gauge with both types of thermocouples.



* The reference/Fluke and the analogue/Fluke measured the same, but the analogue gauge was much slower in response.

* Compared to the reference the analogue gauge/original thermocouple was both slower and read aprox.100°C lower in temp.

* The reference/Fluke and digital/Fluke read the same up to 800°C give or take couple of degrees.



The last test was the heat image, I managed to take a pic of the thermocouples when the temp had settled close to 750°C. (had to let go of the cables to take the pic so the right one tilted upwards and got a little bit hotter than the left one, the upper thermocouple was probably a tad hotter than 750°C when I took the picture.)



Here is a temp chart blacksmiths use to judge the temp of the metal, the tip color seems to be somewhere between the 704°C and the 760°C mark in the chart so I think I can assume that the reading is pretty correct.



So, what have I learned from this? I will remove the analogue gauge and its probe and couple a Fluke thermocouple to the digital display I used for measuring T2 earlier. Much faster response and an, as far as I can tell, accurate reading.

Cheers!
/Anders

Offline RansomT

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #879 on: February 17, 2015, 09:59:29 AM »
What about placement of the probes?   Temp is "usually" cooler in the center of the flow as compared to the edges.

Offline salt27

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #880 on: February 17, 2015, 10:06:46 AM »
Anders,
  I like analogue gauges because they seem to be easier to read on the salt. (on a motorcycle)

When I purchased our EGT setup I bought digital with fast reacting thermocouples.

You just made me glad I did. (and yes they are hard to see)

Thanks, Don

Offline manta22

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #881 on: February 17, 2015, 10:14:05 AM »
Anders;

The speed of response is usually determined by the thickness of the thermocouple wires making the junction. There is probably also some filtering in the instrument but the main contributor is the thermocouple response time. For very fast response, there are "fine wire" thermocouples but their disadvantage is that they don't last as long at high temperature due to the small diameter wires. A shielded thermocouple such as yours also adds to the response time.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ

Offline nanno

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #882 on: February 17, 2015, 12:45:36 PM »
All the best for Speed Weekend, Anders!

Offline Mobacken Racing

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #883 on: February 17, 2015, 05:02:05 PM »
The thermocouple is fitted in the middle of the jet stream to avoid being in the boundary layer, don´t know if it is correct or not but there it is.  :-)

The Fluke probes are really fast even though they are shielded ones, they are a couple of mm´s thinner than the old and slower probes though.

Thanks nanno!

---------

To stop the oil leaking from the freepower shaft seal into the exhaust housing I fitted a needle valve and a pressure gauge to the gearbox oil line, now I can adjust the oil pressure over the oil jets and hopefully find a setting that gives plenty of cooling for the bearings without flooding the shaft tunnel as it probably did during the last test.



I also removed the analogue temp gauges and connected the digital gauge to the Fluke thermocouple, fitted an oil temp gauge and removed the rev counter since it had quit working for some reason. I can´t see it anyway when I run the bike and the LED diodes are probably causing a bit of turbulence where they sit just in front of the compressor wheel so I decided to run without it. With 10°C outside temp I reached 66.000rpm at 2.5 bar P2 so if I keep the max pressure a bit lower than that I should be safe.



I also fitted a rubber splash shield to keep any water or ice from being thrown from the front wheel into the air intake.



Before I called it a night I started fitting some decals to the rear fairing, Compucar is my fighter-jet car racing friend Ernies business and the other sticker speaks for itself... :-)



Cheers!
/Anders
« Last Edit: February 17, 2015, 05:09:08 PM by Mobacken Racing »

Offline Seldom Seen Slim

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Re: APS/Ω Gas turbine bike build
« Reply #884 on: February 17, 2015, 07:03:32 PM »
Anders, I can say without much fear of being wrong, that you've done a first on the Forum when you mentioned that you turned your engine to 66,000 rpm.  Then you added that it was done without maximum boost, and if you keep it low the engine will be safe.

Yep - I can say pretty well that none of us has ever even thought of having a engine that'll spin past 20,000 - much less over 60k. :-o :-o
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