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Bonneville Salt Flats Discussion => Build Diaries => Topic started by: swackerle on April 14, 2012, 04:20:19 AM



Title: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 14, 2012, 04:20:19 AM
So this is my build.  Its been a crazy adventure so far and there is still a lot of work left.

So it all started with a trying to find an engine for the build.  I needed to stick with a vintage engine so my choices that fit within the rules were somewhat limited.  It took awhile but I found a GMC 302 inline six, only catch was that it was 6hrs away...  so after alittle debate and some phone tag, my dad and I decided to take a day and go pick it up.  We emptied the truck and cleared our day.  6hrs later, we had a 302 in the back of the truck.  Here it is in the garage after I first got it.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/First302.jpg)

It was complete from carb to oil pan, but it was locked up.  I tried everything to get it to turn.  I let it sit with PB blaster for a week, no luck. WD-40 for a week, no luck.  Coca-Cola for another week, no luck.  Not even with a breaker bar and a pipe on the end of it.  I popped the head off and it was a mess of rust in there.  I took a hammer and a block of wood to the pistons, but it was to no avail because pistons 3 and 4 were at the bottom of the stroke.  So the engine was torn down the rest of the way, labeled put away.  It took my dad and I with two hammers and two pieces of pipe hitting at the same time to get the stuck pistons out and they didn't come out in one piece.  Also when tearing the engine apart I found that one cylinder had been sleeved.  Things weren't as cherry as I had hoped.

One day my dad and I were passing a junk yard that was within 20 mins of the house, neither of us had been in it because it was small perhaps an acre, and only carried large trucks.  We decided to stop by, the people were very polite and allowed us to go through the yard and sure enough, there were 2 GMC 302s! Within 20 mins of the house!  And they both turned by hand!  I bought them that day and had them home by the end of the week.  Here they are,

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/2_302.jpg)

I was very happy, I now had 3 somewhat rare engines.  I tore one down and kept the best of the 3 complete for reference and if I end up not needing it, I am sure someone will want it.  The new block was great, I took it and the crank, head and cam to get cleaned and checked at the machine shop.  Here's the specs of what I have done to the engine.

Block bored .125 over
GRP 7.5 inch connecting rods
JE 13 to 1 compression pistons
I personally ported the head
SBS 2.02 intake valve, 1.60 exhaust
Cam will be custom ground, saving up for that right now

In case you use GRP for a connecting rod, they now have a GMC 302 connecting rod and stock bearing provided by me for an example.
Also in case you use JE pistons with a stock head, they have a cylinder cut off from one of the heads, it was was too rusted to use for anything but research.

So the engine is being put together and now I needed focus on the body.  I was looking for anything between 1923 and 1948.  I called almost every junkyard in MD and personally went to the rest.  Everything was either 1 year off or way to gone to be worth working with.  I started driving down old country roads looking for anything in the weeds.  I met a lot of nice people, but no one had what I needed.  One evening I got a call from John The Junkyard Dog, that's what he referred to himself as, he said he might have what I was looking for and he definitely did.  He had a couple of pre 38 coupes and sedans as well as a barn filled with 1900-1930 touring bodies and model t parts.  But sitting outside, was a 1926 Model T coupe.  After some negotiating and some emotional support (he was a classic hoarder) the Model T was in the truck and on route to the house.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/OnTheTruck.jpg)
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Stock.jpg)

Then the work began.

Stock wind shield height,

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/StockHeight.jpg)

Current height and future ride height,

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/CurrentStage.jpg)

Those aren't the actual tires that I plan on using, but it is the right rear end,

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/9WithDiscs.jpg)

I know its a 9 inch and I will loose up to 4% of power through friction, but its what I am most familiar with.

That's what I have so far, I just got 100 feet of 1 5/8 .120 wall tube steel so I am now working on the roll cage.  I'll try to keep the updates coming, but this first post is 4 months of work so it might be alittle slow.

Thanks,
Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Fordrat31 on April 14, 2012, 07:09:43 AM
Neat looking project! You said your working on the cage now, so what does the frame look like?

Mike


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: wheelrdealer on April 14, 2012, 08:20:33 AM
Looks like a great build. Good luck and tanks for sharing it with us.

Bill


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Tman on April 14, 2012, 08:57:55 AM
From another inliner, looking good! Keep us updated. :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: SPARKY on April 14, 2012, 09:16:16 AM
if you are running near the record how much money would you spend for an additional 4% of power

 i can tell you a bunch---get your self a GM 7.5 rear end --- I am a great believer in drivetrain effieciency


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: dw230 on April 14, 2012, 09:44:19 AM
Sam,

Glad you took my advice and joined up over here. You will get a lot of hints and support from this group.

DW


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Stan Back on April 14, 2012, 12:25:26 PM
Sam --

PM sent.

Stan


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 14, 2012, 02:56:07 PM
Thanks to Stan and Tom for some great advice!  The chassis is being built at the same time that I am building the roll cage.  I am using 2x4 .120 wall rectangle tube for the frame which will be almost 18 ft long (that's as long as my trailer is).  The roll cage will be built on top of that.  Sparky, you are right about drive train efficiency.  I am just more familiar with the 9 inch so that's the route I went with.  If I get some more time and some extra cash I will invest in a 7.5.  Thanks everyone for the help!

-Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 17, 2012, 06:22:26 PM
So I got to work on the frame today.  Here it is in the body (upside down) to test how tight it fits. 

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Frame_1.jpg)

It doesn't look square because of the lens, but it is.  I measured it twice, thrice and then a fourth time before cutting.  Then another few times before and after welding.  Now I gotta flip it over and start welding up mounting points for the body to the chassis.  I want to be able to completely remove the body from the chassis, so I plan on having it bolt to the chassis with grade 8 bolts.  It'll be easier for me to work on as well as easier for the tech inspectors to look at everything that I've done and make sure it's safe.

That's all for now.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: zenndog on April 17, 2012, 06:36:11 PM
I am looking forward to watching this build


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: 38flattie on April 17, 2012, 06:47:11 PM
Sam, I'm looking forward to this one!

I don't know if you already have 4 bolt mains for that, but if not, Tony has some at a killer price in the classifieds!

What are you running for ignition? I have a Jimmy mag, if you need to borrow it.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Stan Back on April 17, 2012, 07:08:09 PM
I can't tell if you've completely welded the side rails yet.  If not, it might be a good idea to wall off some portions if you later need to add some weight (buckshot, etc.).


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: maguromic on April 17, 2012, 08:21:53 PM
Kool build, as GMC guy myself, I am looking forward to reading about your build.  Buddy, thanks for the plug on the parts, but I already sold the 4-bolt mains.  Tony


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 17, 2012, 09:33:34 PM
The community in this forum has been the best!  Everyone is very helpful and is full of valuable (and hard earned) information. 

Too bad those 4 bolt mains have been sold!  If anyone else has a line on another set, please let me know! 

38flattie, you're caddy is awesome!  As for ignition I plan to use a HEI distributor because thats what I am familiar with. 


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Kiwi Paul on April 17, 2012, 11:15:49 PM
Looking Good. Almost a twin to my car. I also have a 26-7 T Coupe bodied Comp Coupe in (slooowww..) progress. Mine will have Vintage 4 power, hopefully. I have an engine combo that will be on loan for this car. I`d be interested to get some of those discarded body chop sections from you, if you still have `em. My body had a really radical cut when I got it. A bit hard to fit the cage in and still be able to drive. I will send you a few pics if you want. I haven`t posted any on the forum due to computer illiteracy on my end.Good luck with your build.......


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 18, 2012, 02:09:02 AM
I'd love to see pics of you're model t, it would be interesting to compare the two.  Sorry to say though, most of the chopped sections have been added to other parts of the body to take care of other rusted areas.  If you need some help with posting pics, just let me know and I can help you through it.  Its actually quite simple once you get the hang of it.  Send me an email or a pm and I can walk you through it in.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: zenndog on April 19, 2012, 03:13:58 PM
More Pics from both of you guys please :-). I really love T's


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: DND on April 20, 2012, 08:09:02 AM
Yes more pics, i have been a T nut too since my Dads hot rod in the 30's was a 25'T , had a Fronty Head - cam - oil pressure to the drilled crank - lowered with buffalo wire wheels and 106 mph at the lakes.

Looking forward to seeing your T coupe take shape.

Don


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Kiwi Paul on April 20, 2012, 10:17:20 PM
I`ll try. I have to get two customer cars out of the Shop next week, hopefully then I can maneuver the T into a position where I can wield the Camera... :-D


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 26, 2012, 07:12:47 PM
Sorry for the delay, lots of measuring, twice, three times.not much progress over the past week or so.  But I do have some pics to share.

I began work on the front end, I got it at the height I want and its tacked in place right now, nothing is permanent just yet.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Front_End_1.jpg)

Do anyone know A)what the max castor allowed is? B)have any recommendations for an appropriate 200mph castor angle?

Also starting to mock up the roll cage.  My dad helped me make the wood pieces.  20 bucks instead of a few hundred if I mess up the wood, he is a very clever guy.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Wood_Cage_1.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Wood_Cage_2.jpg)

That's all for now, I got lots of work left to do I know, but if I put in a little every day.  I should be able to make it in August.

-Sam W



Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: 55chevr on April 26, 2012, 10:09:36 PM
I used EMT tubing to bend up a pattern.   Cheap and easy ...


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 27, 2012, 02:59:11 AM
"caster" angle, not "castor".  Sorry about that.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Tman on April 27, 2012, 09:03:04 AM
Your Camber looks backwards, is that axle above the frame?

As for Caster you will find it all over the board. From Zero degrees to 20 degrees. I am in this decision phase myself right now.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: protype on April 27, 2012, 10:12:06 AM
I agree your spidles look upside down.  What are the spindles from?


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 27, 2012, 11:27:14 AM
The spindles are off of a 1960 ford truck and came with about 10 degrees of caster built in.  I had to compensate on the axle to get the caster at 0.  I am going to put some weight on it and see if it flops to either side, I can always flip it over so the kingpin holders are leaning the other way.  And the axle is above the frame, that's how it will be mounted to get the belly pan as low to the ground as I can.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Peter Jack on April 27, 2012, 12:16:39 PM
That isn't caster that's built in, that's king pin inclination and the kingpins should be closer at the top than the bottom. Caster is fore and aft inclination. When the pins lean back that is positive caster. Camber refers to the angle of the wheels. When they lean in at the top that is negative camber. Conventionally you would have negative camber and positive caster. Everything else has been tried at some point. The car will be dangerous if you leave the kingpins pointing outward at the top.

Pete


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: jdincau on April 27, 2012, 02:12:00 PM
And if you search for "scrub radius" on this board you will lean that a line extending the king pin centerline should pass through the spot on the ground where the center of the front wheel contact patch sits.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: SPARKY on April 27, 2012, 05:42:49 PM
Doug Odom recomends 5-6 degs max  remember circle track guys use caster to weight jack coming of the corners---Peter Jack has some post on the subject it you need to read before you set it up!!!!


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 27, 2012, 06:44:45 PM
After some more research and a good conversation, here is front end version 2.0, now with proper scrub radius!

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Front_End_2.jpg)

It's still not finalized, but with the proper backspacing on the wheels, I should have the scrub radius aimed right at the center of the tread on each tire.  If I did my math right, the tread width will be 45 inches.  The caster has been set to about 6 degrees but that can change if needed.

Also today I got a fancy racing seat and with alittle modification, it will fit perfectly!  Thanks to Udo for the seat!

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Racing_Seat.jpg)

Now I can really get to work with the roll cage.  That gets priority, everything else can fit around it.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: protype on April 27, 2012, 09:06:47 PM
I would suggest that you get a copy of the Race car Vehicle Dynamics book by Milliken.  There is a good chapter on the front end geometry that could help you out.  As far as the caster settings some of the more experienced salt racers could make suggestions.  There has been a bit of dicussion of about scrub radius in other threads. but unless you turn a lot near 0 is most likely best.  The same may be said for camber as it also effects the steer geometry.  I am sure the book would be available at some libraries.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: manta22 on April 27, 2012, 11:51:40 PM
A little scrub radius helps you get feedback into the steering wheel to feel what your front tires are doing.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: 38flattie on April 28, 2012, 10:11:59 AM
I'm running 10 degrees, and an 1/8 toe in-the car handles like it's on a string.



Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on May 01, 2012, 10:25:08 PM
That's what I need to hear, thanks 38flattie.

Had a bit of a set back today, there's no way aluminum rods are going to fit, so now I have to find custom steel rods that wont break the bank and take forever to make.

On a good note though, I found a local shop that has an 1 5/8 tube bender and got the first hope made for the roll cage.  I also got ahold of a 6 inch diameter, 5/16 inch wall tube that I plan on using as a drive shaft container.  That will give me plenty of clearnace between myself and 6,000rpm of steel.  Its getting pretty tight in the cockpit.

Still need to get ahold of fire suppression system, fuel tank and a water tank.  Any recommendations on quality products? 

Thanks,

Sam W


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Tman on May 02, 2012, 05:08:39 PM
That's what I need to hear, thanks 38flattie.

Had a bit of a set back today, there's no way aluminum rods are going to fit, so now I have to find custom steel rods that wont break the bank and take forever to make.

On a good note though, I found a local shop that has an 1 5/8 tube bender and got the first hope made for the roll cage.  I also got ahold of a 6 inch diameter, 5/16 inch wall tube that I plan on using as a drive shaft container.  That will give me plenty of clearnace between myself and 6,000rpm of steel.  Its getting pretty tight in the cockpit.

Still need to get ahold of fire suppression system, fuel tank and a water tank.  Any recommendations on quality products? 

Thanks,

Sam W

Joe Timney at Delaware Chassis Works is the closest to you for safety gear and advice. Call him before you go any farther.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: 38flattie on May 02, 2012, 06:05:56 PM
How big of fuel tank do you need? I have a 20 gal. tank just used at B'ville year, and a new 3 gallon tank.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on May 02, 2012, 10:35:13 PM
Thanks for the contact Tman, I'll try to get ahold of him for advice on proper safety equipment. 

38flattie - pm sent


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Captthundarr on May 02, 2012, 10:41:06 PM
Give Joe T. a couple of days as they just got back from Ohio running the first ECTA event there. It was wet, it was cold and it was great. Joe and the rest worked thier tail off.

Frank


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on May 21, 2012, 03:48:24 AM
Ok got a few updates.  I've been kinda spread out over the whole vehicle doing a lot of welding to get things solid and safe.

First I got the front end welded into place.  I know there has been a lot of controversy over running sprung or solid, but I went with solid for simplicity and time.  8 degrees caster, no camber and a hint of scrub.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Front_End_Finalized.jpg)

Next is the firewall, its 3/16 steel and holds the SFI bell housing very tight.  I am feeling very comfortable that the straight six Jimmy wont torque itself out of the vehicle.  Plus it allows me to pull the engine very easily if needed.  Its only roughed out right now and when I get some more time it'll have a much better shape.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/FireWall_1.jpg)

And finally, I have been pretty busy behind the firewall.  The cage has been started and welding to the firewall.  The rear end is where it should be though not finalized at the moment.  As well as that tube going between the trans and the rear is 7/16 wall, 6 inch tube.  Since the drive shaft was going to be so close I wanted alittle more than a 2 inch, 1/4 inch thick strap of metal.  If the drive shaft can escape my heavy duty tube, I am in a lot of trouble.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Cage_Started_Drive_Shaft.jpg)

That's all for now, its not much but if I keep chipping at it, I hope to make an appearance at SpeedWeek this year as car number 877 XO VFCC

-Sam W


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Rex Schimmer on May 21, 2012, 09:09:27 AM
I like your drive shaft "containment vessel"! Brutal but perfect! Your build is progressing well.

Rex


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: wheelrdealer on May 22, 2012, 08:14:41 PM
Sam:

Great build. I really like the simplicity of your T. Good job on the driveshaft tube. I had one break and fights its way into the car with me last year. Dodged a bullet so the floor is being replaced with a .120 13/4 tubing cage and .120 plate for a floor and drive shaft tunnel.

Thanks for sharing your build.

Bill



Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: zenndog on June 04, 2012, 10:02:03 PM
I am loving this build also. I like that you are just getting in there and doing it. I hope you get it done for Speedweek. :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 06, 2012, 10:17:37 PM
Alright, got some pretty good progress with the build, so I'll let the pictures do the talking.

First I got the steering box in a place where I like it.  No wierd angles from lock to lock.  I tried to keep the steering geometry as simple as possible working with all 90 degree angles, accompanied by a heavy duty steering box mount.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Steering_Box.jpg)

Next I am beginning to make a skeleton of what the body will look like.  The nose won't be removable, but I plan on making everything else detachable for easy mantainence.  You can also see the belly pan.  The belly pan is the roof off of a van that my dad chopped off.  Can't beat 14x6 feet of 16 gauge steel for 35 bucks!

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Body_Start.jpg)

I've also put a lot of time into the roll cage and its almost complete, there are a few more pieces that will be put in there but what you see there should be all the rule book says I need.  I just want to put in a few more things for comfort and strength.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Roll_Cage_Top.jpg)

And the gussets, look just like the pictures in the rulebook don't they?

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Gussets.jpg)

So thats all the progress that I've made so far.  Though I am sad to say that I probably won't be able to make it to SpeedWeek.  I have the time and the drive, I just don't have the funds.  Three major peices are going to hold me back; fire suppression system, personal safety things (suit, gloves, helmet and neck restraint) and tires.  I have done the math and I wont make enough money to get to the big show, so I am shooting to have it out for World Finals this year which will also give me alittle more time to test and tune the vehicle.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Stan Back on June 07, 2012, 04:39:53 PM
PM sent.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 22, 2012, 06:26:45 PM
Got a few more pics of progress.  A lot of the major stuff is in place or at least has a place to be, so it's all about the details. 

I finished the roll cage and painted it.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Cage_Painted.jpg)

I've also been working on the pedals.  I have the clutch and brake master in place, as well as the clutch slave.  I am waiting for the engine to be in place before I start working on the throttle pedal and linkage.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Pedals_1.jpg)

As you can see with the last picture the steering has made its way past the firewall.  Its going to go alittle further to a quick release so I can get out of the vehicle easier.  It's connected in front of the firewall as well, with a support along the way.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Steering_2.jpg)

Also the wheels with moon discs came in.  5 on 5.5 for ford lug pattern, fully welded, 15 x 4.5 wheels.  Also got 1 inch lug nuts while I was at it.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Wheels_1.jpg)

I've also been working on the trunk lid.  It's made out of 3/16ths steel to the same shape as the original and will be bolted to a very secure frame with grade 8 bolts.  This will allow me to bolt/weld a parachute and push bar (if needed) to it and still be able to remove the body and rear end.  No pictures of that yet, it's still in the early stages of design.

That's all for now.

-Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Glen on June 22, 2012, 06:41:01 PM
Looking at the front axle that's sitting on two towers, I think I would x-brace it side to side to assure it of no side loading.Just a thought.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 25, 2012, 03:21:17 AM
Perhaps this pic will help show the angles of how I put things together.  I might cross brace it if I have some tube left over.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Steering_Support.jpg)


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Dr Goggles on June 27, 2012, 06:25:11 PM
Perhaps this pic will help show the angles of how I put things together.  I might cross brace it if I have some tube left over.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Steering_Support.jpg)

I'd be having a rethink on that design. If you want to go with that concept there are various ways to achieve it without everything being in tension like that. I'd be having a close look to see that those welds are getting full penetration, are you running them hot enough?

The shocks transmitted through that arrangement can be quite severe and "hanging" everything like that means a failure in just one of those welds could cause a pretty serious upset.Larger dia. pipe will vastly increase the strength, or using a plate instead. Ideally having the axle under the chassis rail would alleviate the basic concerns and change the stresses on the joins.Doing that would also allow you to use some sort of compliance on the front like bumpstops or something.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: DND on June 28, 2012, 02:11:59 AM
Hi Model T

I second what the DR says, and if you stay with the axle on top you should gusset the heck out of it.

Starting at the axle end where your angle tubes come up to meet the kingpin boss, and put a wrap around strap around the outside of the boss and down those angled tubes and put gussets on all those tube joints.

In that kind of a load on the axle you can not have too many gussets, as you wan't to keep the shiny side up and rubber side down !!!

Don


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Peter Jack on June 28, 2012, 03:07:32 AM
PM sent.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: manta22 on June 28, 2012, 11:50:32 AM
Frankly, unless your car is extremely heavy, I think you are OK. It won't hurt to add gussets if you feel that you need them. The quality of your welds is, of course the key to success.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 28, 2012, 07:07:54 PM
This is exactly why I wanted to post this build on the forums here.  I am a rookie in every respect and need all the input I can get!  I am going to add a few more pieces to the front end.  In situations like this, more is certainly better.

Also I took some better pictures of my welds.  I think that biggest problem is the quality of camera (cell phone) and shadows.  I got out the good camera and took a few shots, so let me know if there you have any suggestions for improvement. 

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Weld_1.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Weld_3.jpg)

Thanks guys,
Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: saltwheels262 on June 28, 2012, 07:27:27 PM


(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Weld_1.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Weld_3.jpg)

Thanks guys,
Sam

they all look good to me.
the weld in picture 1 and the right side of number 2 look like they were done by a different person than the left side picture number 2.

why is there a gap in the welds?

this is coming from a guy with a fair eye and is not a welder.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: manta22 on June 28, 2012, 07:53:09 PM
"why is there a gap in the welds?"

I don't know where these welds are but the rule book specifies stitch welds on roll cage gussetts. This is to keep a crack from propagating completely along the length of a gussett.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ



Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Dr Goggles on June 28, 2012, 08:57:54 PM
Hey Sam,
Those welds look OK. For your own satisfaction spend a bit of time welding similar things that you are using on the car and then giving them hell with a BFH. You should be able to completely mangle a piece of 1&3/4 tube  which you have welded to a rail. If you crack the weld or break it out along the bead line then it is of less than ideal strength. First you need to satisfy yourself that you are getting full penetration, then you need to work on tidier beads, tidier beads have less potential for crack propagation. Many people will say " the neater the bead the better the weld", if the penetration is good" that's pretty close to right....

You're right about "putting it out there" too. I'm one for putting all of your exploits in the public view, if there's something wrong you'll know about it way sooner than Secret Squirrel will with his well hidden poorly conceived ideas, you'll learn way faster and get stuff done quicker.

Is that gasless you're using?.....it looks very spattery, are you keeping your torch clean? Consider some inox spray to save it sticking everywhere.

My only suggestion is to get in a bit of practice on mismatched thicknesses. It's much easier to control heat and penetration of two identical pieces, that changes when you are welding light to heavy and the risk of poor penetration on the heavier guage occurs, the piece of tube onto the rail above could maybe do with a little more wire speed , less "cross-stitching" and more focus on the rail than directly at the root of the joint. I say that because the weld has undercut the  tube slightly, which contrasts with the edge of the bead on the rail, "cross-stitching" will allow more fill and dissipate heat but has left a ragged finish to the bead, by allowing the bead to flow out a little more it will run a little hotter, focusing that heat more at the rail than the root of the joint will increase the penetration on the rail, lessen the burn on the tube and give a better finish to the bead.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: saltwheels262 on June 28, 2012, 09:30:12 PM
"why is there a gap in the welds?"

I don't know where these welds are but the rule book specifies stitch welds on roll cage gussetts. This is to keep a crack from propagating completely along the length of a gussett.

Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ



i understand now.
thank you.

not a roll cage guy either.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: rgn on June 28, 2012, 09:42:23 PM
Hi Sam, It's amazing how much a little bit of weld will hold, it's also amazing how quickly a little crack or defect under load will turn into a failure.  It's hard to tell looking at the screen of the computer, but the l/h side of the unpainted butt joint looks as if it may be undercut?  A welding defect is anything that compromises the usefulness of the finished weld. 

Undercutting reduces the cross-sectional thickness of the base metal, and reduces the strength of the weld and material.  The weld and the undercut area becomes the weak point in the sum of parts.  Undercut is usually a product of excessive current or too little wire feed.  If you are using gasless as the Dr suspects, think about renting a bottle gas suited to the metal type you are using, it makes a huge amount of difference.

Any of you used the new generation of inverter migs?  No splatter at all and they weld like wow and don't cause your electrical meter to jump off it's pivot.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 28, 2012, 10:32:46 PM
Wow!  Thanks to everyone for all the advise!

-I am using a gasless welder, hence all the splatter.

-I will try to keep in mind aiming the feed more towards the frame (or heavier metal) to prevent undercutting from here on and redo a few strategic welds.

-I am going to heed the advice of Dr. Goggles (mostly because of the Dr. part :-D) and take my 4 pound sledge to a weld and do my damnest to break it.  Though I know this isn't a completely accurate representation of the forces acting upon the cage and other pieces, I feel that it will at least let me know how my welding stacks up.

-The gap in the gussets is for the rulebook, just like Neil said.  Also one side is left handed, the other is right handed, hence the difference.

Thanks again guys.  Progress is slow, but at least it's heading in the right direction with alittle help from everyone.

-Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: zenndog on June 28, 2012, 11:30:09 PM

Undercutting reduces the cross-sectional thickness of the base metal, and reduces the strength of the weld and material.  The weld and the undercut area becomes the weak point in the sum of parts.  Undercut is usually a product of excessive current or too little wire feed.  If you are using gasless as the Dr suspects, think about renting a bottle gas suited to the metal type you are using, it makes a huge amount of difference.


There are many guys on this site that are probably expert welders....I am not one of them.

That said, I think you should increase the wire feed. Looks like you are penetrating but not filling enough wire into the "puddle".

On the front axle I can't tell but it looks to me like you were not getting enough penetration and you have blobs of "wire" that are sitting there on the surface of the joint. Does anyone else see that? It is hard to tell because those shots are not close ups.

I think you should invest in a gas bottle for your welder as another person suggested, it is really a low cost compared to what you are undertaking and you will like it. I didn't notice but did you mention if your welder is 220 or 110?

Love this build, go man go! Again, I think it is great that you are just getting out there and doing it.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: DND on June 29, 2012, 12:27:20 AM
Hi Sam

Maybe you can find a weld shop in your area, take some of your pics and show the man.

Also you could pay him for a bit of time for a lesson or two, then you have an idea of what to shoot for.

I took a nite school welding class and that was one of the best things i ever did, not only to weld but you learn about the safety of welding too.

Don


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Peter Jack on June 29, 2012, 12:49:34 AM
I sent you one more PM. I like the welds you're showing here with the exception that maybe you're travelling just a little too fast.

Using a little manipulation where you go a little forward and then about half the distance back and repeat over and over might also help.

The project continues to look good.  :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

Pete


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: charlie101 on June 29, 2012, 11:13:04 AM
I'm a hobby welder, but i found that I did the most learning by taking an expert welders advice to weld trial bits of the same material, thickness and weld in the same position and then cut the pieces up, studying the welds really thoroughly with a magnifying glass, he told me "that way you really take your time, focusing and think what's going on". That was a while ago and for stick welds, but still today and with a MIG for important welds I find myself not confident before I cut up some trial bits.

Another tip I practise several times and found really useful, was simply soldering up a model of the construction with copper wire
http://autospeed.com/cms/title_Zero-Cost-Modelling-of-SpaceFrames/A_111095/article.html
http://autospeed.com/cms/title_Chalky-Part-5/A_111100/article.html
http://www.autospeed.com.au/cms/A_111161/article.html
First impression it looks somewhat childish and simple but really gives a good basic perception of the construction weakness.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on July 05, 2012, 04:19:56 AM
Thanks everyone!  My welds have cleaned up dramatically and they are looking quite professional (if I do say so myself!)  I got a lot of welds to redo, but it'll be safer and that's what matters.

Thanks,
Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: manta22 on July 05, 2012, 05:26:12 PM
I'm a hobby welder, but i found that I did the most learning by taking an expert welders advice to weld trial bits of the same material, thickness and weld in the same position and then cut the pieces up, studying the welds really thoroughly with a magnifying glass, he told me "that way you really take your time, focusing and think what's going on". That was a while ago and for stick welds, but still today and with a MIG for important welds I find myself not confident before I cut up some trial bits.

Another tip I practise several times and found really useful, was simply soldering up a model of the construction with copper wire
http://autospeed.com/cms/title_Zero-Cost-Modelling-of-SpaceFrames/A_111095/article.html
http://autospeed.com/cms/title_Chalky-Part-5/A_111100/article.html
http://www.autospeed.com.au/cms/A_111161/article.html
First impression it looks somewhat childish and simple but really gives a good basic perception of the construction weakness.

It is simple but not childish. I've used balsa wood sticks to build a model of a chassis to envestigate its stiffness & strength. It workd too.


Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on July 19, 2012, 06:23:27 PM
Got a few cosmetic updates.  I put a roof on the Model T and I think it looks pretty good for being from an early '60s panel truck.  Also began working on the front.  I got 2 fenders from an early '50s Chevy 1 ton and turned them around.  Then I used the rest of the roof from the panel truck to finish the nose.  I know its a large frontal area but I hope it doesn't create too much surface to push through. 

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Nose_2.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Nose_1.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Nose_3.jpg)

I figure that most airplanes, rockets and even submarines are larger in the front, progressively getting smaller to the rear.  If they are stable up towards 300mph or even just a couple knots, then hopefully my larger to smaller design will hold steady and not create too much drag.  Special thanks to a few choice people for their aerodynamic tips. 


-Sam W


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: bucketlist on July 20, 2012, 12:49:17 AM
...I got 2 fenders from an early '50s Chevy 1 ton and turned them around...


Interesting. I'm planning to make a plug for a fiberglass nose. Starting with a pair of reversed fenders from out behind the barn will save me a bunch of structure and contour work. And instead of so much guesswork, I'll just prop them up until they do what's needed and proceed from there.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on September 21, 2012, 02:02:59 PM
It's been awhile, but that doesn't mean that I have been slacking off!  Well perhaps alittle bit of slacking off, my current plan is to skip World Finals so I can take the time to do things right.  Too much left to do to be there with any sort of shot at a record.  Onto the pics...

I got the engine in and built a header for it.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Engine_Header_zps82be30c1.jpg)

Also put a roof on the body and added an escape hatch.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Escape_Hatch_zpsd5742981.jpg)

The trunk is made form 1/4 inch steel and has 7, 1/2 inch grade 8 bolts holding to a rigid tube frame underneath.  This allows me to get to the rear end if needed.  I also welding a chute mount that uses a 3/4 inch grade 8 bolt to hold the tube in place.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Trunk_Chute_zpsa5e55972.jpg)

I've also placed the fuel tank and I am using an old gas tank as a water tank.  The old gas tank fit perfectly into place and should hold enough water to keep me cool for a run or two.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Fuel_Tank_zps8f6f5ac0.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Water_Tank_zpsb76a83fe.jpg)

I made a steering wheel which is also removable for getting in and out of the tight cockpit.  Its a smaller diameter square tube inside a larger one.  Fits very tight with no play, but still slides out easily.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Removable_Wheel_zps8c645cfe.jpg)

Lastly, I redid the front end to have a smaller frontal area.  Instead of having the wheels inside of the front end, they are now flush with the body.  Those are wood wheels that are stand ins while the real tires are in storage until next year.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/New_Front_Metal_zpsa86f55ca.jpg)

That's all for now.  I hope to have the whole thing ready for some ECTA events before taking it out to the salt, but doing this project solo (though my dad has been a great help) take just a little more time with a full time job.

Thanks,
Sam W


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: wheelrdealer on September 21, 2012, 04:25:26 PM
Sam:

Those darn full time jobs always get in the way of our race car fab time. Looks good.

Bill


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: jimmy six on September 21, 2012, 05:01:45 PM
I have no idea what you are planning for HP out of the GMC but since your class says FCC with 13-1 and a carburator manifold (unless you are planning some other intake) I would not worry about 4 bolt mains. I have run GMC's wide open on the salt for 37 years and only the 12 Port on 78% nitro had the 4-bolts. Most of my others had 1" straps added or nothing. The bottom end of GMC is pretty stout. If it is well balenced you should be fine.

Does the trans have an OD? That will kill more power than the Ford 9" which has many of gears available if you go to the NASCAR suppliers. The standard Ford gears are good if you carry 2 or 3 tire diameters along.

I hope your front isn't too much because the pictures make it look pretty big. An Opal GT might have gone thru the air a little better. But what do I know my GMC's push a 32 grille shell....Good Luck...Looks great.................JD 


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Frankie7799 on September 21, 2012, 05:41:40 PM
Very cool build Sam. Just found it today. Looking foward to future updates.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Dr Goggles on September 21, 2012, 05:55:20 PM
Lovin it Sam, you can't buy this one in a kit :cheers:

Do you know anyone with some pro camera gear, like someone who does it for a living? no complaints about your shots but it might be good to have a few big hi res shots of your build....... :wink: :-D


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: 4-barrel Mike on September 21, 2012, 06:57:16 PM
Doc, what are you seeing? 

On screen, I'm seeing 533x400 pics (the site automagically resizes to maximum 400 pixels high).  The pics are 800x600 on photobucket.   :cheers:

Mike


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on September 21, 2012, 11:28:09 PM
Funny you should request the use of a better camera, I just traded my slightly better camera for a nitrous kit.  Though I have many friends withing my profession that have some really nice equipment if some better shots are requested. 

JD - Thanks for all the advice, you've been a HUGE help with getting the GMC beast to this point.  I will be running a 4 barrel methanol carb, with massive lift cam, ported and polished head, 2.02 intake 1.60 exhaust valves, 13 to 1 aluminum pistons, 7.5 inch steel rods and some quick math for header tube length and collector length, hopefully I can get maybe 350hp out of the old GMC.  The trans does have an over drive, but I do have a few gear sets for the 9 inch so hopefully I can keep it out of the top gear. 

I understand that the 10 bolt GM rear is very effiecient, but has anyone ran an 8.8 ford or know the difference between the two as far as drive train loss?


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: SPARKY on September 22, 2012, 07:28:59 AM
More efficient---not very efficient lol :-D


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: rgn on September 22, 2012, 08:24:53 AM
I just traded my slightly better camera for a nitrous kit. 

that made me smile.... :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: jimmy six on September 22, 2012, 11:53:35 PM
Swacker, you stated in the first few infos on the engine you were using GRP rods. I was a little worried because they only list aluminum/titanium on their site. Your reply to me says steel....Did they do them for you?. I've been using 2 manufacturers in the LA area but always looking for more. Just before you light it off squit in a little gasoline the first time. Timing a max of 37 works for everyone thats been running GMC's for years made the same power all the way to 42 so we just save possible problems ....Always helped me.....Looks great JD.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on September 23, 2012, 01:23:35 AM
JD, I had GRP make me one aluminum rod to see if it would fit and it would have taken a lot of work to squeeze it in there.  So instead I found a company called R & R Racing Products and they made me a set of steel rods for a reasonable price.  As reasonable as custom rods can be.  I forget where they are located, but they were very upfront about the time it would take to make the rods and they were done exactly on time.  A very nice product as well, made from a solid billet of steel, one of the few companies out there that have a supply of steel thick enough for a GMC rod.  37 degrees you say?  You're the GMC man, so I trust you.  I have an HEI distributor for the GMC so that will be a big help.

rgn, I hope the nitrous wont be needed, but I am going out to the salt to hunt bear, not rabbit, if I end up needing a little bump, it will be used. :-D


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: RidgeRunner on September 23, 2012, 07:52:59 AM
  "So instead I found a company called R & R Racing Products and they made me a set of steel rods for a reasonable price.  As reasonable as custom rods can be.  I forget where they are located, ........."

     http://rrconnectingrods.com/  Is this the company? 

                           Ed


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: SPARKY on September 23, 2012, 08:38:31 AM
I would take some scrap of that box section and some of the tubing weld it just like you have and then cut the tube length wise---look at the bottom of the box tube and look to see what kind of heat track you have you should have a nice consistent circle of heat discoloration---if you do not you are not hot enough--you have already said you may need to work on trying to get more heat in the base  box tube than the round tubing---

I second DR. G thoughts on the frame and load above the axle so all the weld have to do is carry the side to side and the fore and aft  or be DODGE strong


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: jimmy six on September 23, 2012, 06:09:30 PM
I'm not the only GMC to run at 37 degrees so we know that works and I use an HEI too. I only adjust when I trying to split hairs on jetting.

I've run a 75-125 shot thru NOS port nozzles and held the button down for 2.5 miles about 10 times back when my son and I ran our 1940 Chev coupe. Went thru a few bottles. We were running 11-1 at the time. I won't say we didn't have a few problems, I still have the welded pistons to prove it. After we ran 152+ at El Mirage and felt the back lifting we decided we had reach the highest speed we could go safely and took it off. I still have the NOS port plate somewhere in the garage.....Good Luck..........JD


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Dr Goggles on September 23, 2012, 09:54:26 PM
Doc, what are you seeing? 
On screen, I'm seeing 533x400 pics (the site automagically resizes to maximum 400 pixels high).  The pics are 800x600 on photobucket.   :cheers:
Mike

Just in case somebody wants to write an article about the car and wants some build shots, no-one in particular mind you... :roll: :roll: :roll:

If and when the car gets to the salt there may be Hot Rod mags interested because it's a bit different, has some original ideas and is built by a young bloke.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: 4-barrel Mike on September 23, 2012, 11:21:25 PM
Gotcha!   :cheers:

Mike


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on September 26, 2012, 03:33:18 PM
An article about my build you say?  Fame and fortune you say?  Money and beautiful women you say?  Ok, perhaps I am dreaming a bit, but I think most of us wouldn't be on the forum if we didn't dream.  :-D

Well, hopefully this is what you are looking for.

I got my boss's camera and took a few shots, started off alright, pretty standard shots...

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2080.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2078.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2081.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2082.jpg)

Then all of a sudden I started taking some artistic liberties...

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2099.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2089.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2084.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2091.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2096.jpg)

And here's one of myself and the shop for good measure.  It's not big and it's full of stuff, but some great projects have rolled out of there and I hope they will continue...

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T%20High%20Res/IMG_2104.jpg)

I hope those are big enough.  They are pretty big files.

Thanks,
Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Glen on September 26, 2012, 04:43:33 PM
Sam, it's a interesting project. Lots of hours of work. I will be glad to see it on the salt and see it run. Good job on the photos as well tells a lot on the build. :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: GH on September 27, 2012, 08:20:11 AM
JD, after tuning my GMC on the chassis dyno, we ended up with 34 degrees timing. The turbod, efi seamed to like that better. We dropped timing out of it under boost.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: jimmy six on September 27, 2012, 09:12:32 AM
I  think we ran somewhere between 28-30 with the nitrous. It was the days of a lot of experimenting....Love this build and hope to see it one day.........JD


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on October 07, 2012, 11:41:27 PM
Thanks JD, that info on timing will come in very handy when the time comes to chase a record.  I hope that I don't have to use the nitrous, but it will be installed and ready to be used just incase I need an extra bump.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Dr Goggles on October 07, 2012, 11:59:37 PM
Nice work, keep borrowing your boss's camera, :cheers:

remember to document the shots as you save them, sometime I look at the thousands of shots we have and think "WTF is that supposed to show....?"

Nice work, once again.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: 38flattie on October 10, 2012, 10:27:20 AM
First, I want to say I really like this build! I love the vintage cars, with vintage engines-especially the ones like yours that aren't 'cookie cutter' builds.

I understand about artistic liberties, but your'e running a car with an engine that had high HP capabilities. Therefore, I wonder if you've really thought out that exhaust? It would be cool on a hot rod, but it looks like you would have room to get in inside of the frame rails, and run it where you can take advantage of it?


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: wheelrdealer on October 10, 2012, 06:50:59 PM
I like this build too...because it is different, vintage with an interesting drive line. I cant wait to see it on the salt.

Keep chiping away...its come a long way since those first pictures.

BR


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on October 10, 2012, 10:55:33 PM
Thanks for the support everyone!  I keep chipping at it and doing little things here and there.  I am saving up money for the few bigger things that need to be done.  All that safety equipment isn't cheap.

38flattie - you are right that the exhaust could be built with more use of what is available.  It was done in as simple of a manner as possible for the current setup.  I referanced my old books, did some quick garage math and ended up with 28inch primaries being "optimum" before the collector.  If I end up with extra time and tubing, I'll follow Tom Burkland's suggestion of running the pipe back behind the rear window where the vacuum could help pull the exhaust out.

Dr. Goggles -  You are spot on about labeling every picture as what it is suppose to be.  All shots are saved as what they are supposed to be showing.  I work in the electronic media industry so I have developed a habbit of labeling all captured media as it is being loaded onto the computer.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on December 01, 2012, 10:18:32 PM
Alright everyone, I have some updates finally!  Though I am sorry to say that they are with my cell phone again...  I know, I know...  I'll get my boss's camera again soon or just get a new one for myself for Xmas.  For now though, you're going to have to bear with me!

So here it is!  Or most of it, still needs some small things like a hump over the valve cover and a hole for the intake, but its "dry" now with its roof on it.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Full_Body_Low_Shot.jpg)

As you've probably noticed, I have changed the front end design alittle bit, should be alittle more slippery now!  Especially with the belly pan which isn't visible, but it is there.
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/New_Front_Clip.jpg)

And this is the final ride height of the Model T, the front...
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Final_Front_Height.jpg)

The rear...
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Final_Rear_Height.jpg)

Also, you'll notice that there is no giant hole on the side of the vehicle for the exhaust.  That's because I am changing the design so the exhaust exits out the back of the vehicle.  It just makes too much sense.  I got a bunch of mandrel bends from the junkyard for cheap, European cars have some wonderful bends and thick and wide exhaust.

That's all for now everybody.  I'll keep pushing and updating!

-Sam W


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on February 24, 2013, 11:06:21 AM
Alright, its been a little while, but its back to work now!  There's still lots to do if I am going to make it to Speedweek this year.  This is just a quick update, mostly to show that I haven't given up yet!

So I redid the trunk.  The 3/16th steel plate ended up being a little impractical with all the bracing that it required.  So I took it off, cut all the braces and put in a piece of sheet metal.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/New_Trunk_1_zpsce3138a7.jpg)

Then I was able to connect the parachute mount in a much more direct method to the chassis.

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/New_Trunk_2_zpsf020d0f8.jpg)

It's much simpler and to the point.  Also opens up the trunk area for adding weights if I need some more grip.

That's all for now.  I'll keep working and updating as time allows.

-Sam W


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: tauruck on February 24, 2013, 11:59:07 AM
Good to see you're making progress. Can't wait to see it done and running. Nice one.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 01, 2013, 11:18:56 PM
Hey guys, it's been awhile by do not fret, I am still making progress!  New fenders and some boxed goodies, including alternator, wiring harness and distributor.  I also got a new camera so I figured this latest update will be in video form.  So enjoy!

Also came up with a name for the beast "Get The Mail"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3ky8diIu0k&feature=youtu.be (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3ky8diIu0k&feature=youtu.be)

-Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: tauruck on April 02, 2013, 02:50:59 PM
Sam, good to read that you're still on it. Checked the video too. Roll cage and motor look sweet but man you have a job with that body. Rather you than me. I think it's going to good when it's done. :cheers: :cheers: Mike.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 02, 2013, 05:20:47 PM
That is the part that I am dreading, but I'll smooth it out and do my best to make something out of the old beast.

-Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on April 03, 2013, 11:54:16 PM
Better quality video, enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBIQX6GTeUI&feature=youtu.be (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBIQX6GTeUI&feature=youtu.be)


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on August 21, 2013, 03:10:59 PM
I hope all went well at speed week for everyone!  I have been working hard myself and I finally fired up the beast!

Here she is with a jerry rigged muffler to try to keep the noise down, she was still very loud!  That's me on the left and my dad on the right, he's been a huge help through all this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWKi7gl_iq8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWKi7gl_iq8)


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: wheelrdealer on August 21, 2013, 03:20:15 PM
Sam

Its getting there. Looks good with the front gooodyears versus the plywood.

BR


Better quality video, enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBIQX6GTeUI&feature=youtu.be (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBIQX6GTeUI&feature=youtu.be)


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Frankie7799 on August 21, 2013, 04:21:23 PM
Very cool to see more progress Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Dr Goggles on August 21, 2013, 04:53:00 PM
onya Sam :cheers: :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 18, 2014, 05:21:43 PM
Now begins the hard push for Speedweek!  I have been keeping busy everyone and have only 2 pictures to show for it.  First is of the dash, which needs the gauges put in but it looks great regardless;

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/ModelT_DashMock_zps95228f83.jpg)

Next is of the body.  Other than a shot of clear coat, this will be the final paint scheme of the Flying W (new official name of the car).  I know it's not as shiny and smooth as other paint jobs and the fauxtina look is overplayed, but it saves me a lot of time;

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/ModelT_FinalBody_zps2f2e6f5f.jpg)

I'll be at the salt this year with the model t in all it's grungy glory.  Now I've got to get back at it if I hope to keep on schedule.

Thanks,
Sam Wackerle


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 22, 2014, 05:31:52 PM
Keeping at it.  Gauges in the dash;

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/GaugesInDash_zps60913823.jpg)


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: SPARKY on June 22, 2014, 06:20:34 PM
 :-D :-D :-D   Make that old Jimmy Howl  looking so forward to seeing and hearing it!!!


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: tauruck on June 22, 2014, 11:37:37 PM
Way to go Sam.

It's looking great. :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on June 24, 2014, 10:39:03 AM
Got a few more things done last night.  Started work on the fuel system and put on a shiny new methanol carb!

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Carb_Cable_zpsd2606bc9.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Fuel_Pump_zps4de7a8a8.jpg)

Sam Wackerle


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Finallygotit on June 24, 2014, 03:20:43 PM
Subscribing  :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on July 12, 2014, 11:47:29 PM
Lots of work to talk about.  Finishing up the fuel system and also threw in an MSD ignition.  It's now hooked up to the HEI distributor and I made a set of wires, though they aren't shown.  Also the fuel system has a pressure regulator and goes all the way to the carb with a pressure gauge;
(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Ignition_zps962bf05f.jpg)

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/FuelSystemPressure_zpsba16b076.jpg)

Also threw together a windshield.  Hopefully this will get me through tech.  I sandwiched lexan with the strips of metal.  I couldn't find one solid sheet in the thickness I wanted so it's two pieces as you can see.  Should I be worried?

(http://i332.photobucket.com/albums/m327/spamtrain/Model%20T/Windshield_zps83f51779.jpg)

Thanks,
Sam


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Buickguy3 on July 13, 2014, 07:46:37 AM
    Having worked in the glass business for a while, I know that when you stack two pieces of safety glass you can get some great double images in the sun. On the Salt in the morning you run right into the sun. Make sure that you check it out with various sun angles. Just sayin'.
   Doug  :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Tman on July 13, 2014, 11:14:02 AM
Doug, he has two pieces side by side, not sandwiched.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: swackerle on July 14, 2014, 12:51:18 PM
You are correct Tman, I also installed the original sun shield about the windshield so hopefully that will knock out any chance of glare.


Title: Re: 1926 Model T XO/VFCC
Post by: Stan Back on July 14, 2014, 03:44:15 PM
That "sun shield" ought to be worth at least 10 MPH (minus, that is).

Throw some tint on the windshield, don't run before 9 A.M.  How do the roadster guys do it?