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Author Topic: 1953 Studebaker  (Read 25082 times)
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John (Maryland)
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« Reply #120 on: February 27, 2013, 06:16:57 PM »


The KYDEX is a normal extension off the wheel tubs just to cover the gap between the rear quarter and wheel tub, i.e., inner fender shield.  The wheel opening is not affected.
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Bob Drury
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« Reply #121 on: February 28, 2013, 12:36:01 AM »

  That's what I am saying John, you cannot have a inner fender connecting the quarter panel with anything.  The stock quarter panel only touch's the body shell at the door post and at the tail lights.  The wheel tub cannot extend outwards beyond the stock trunk inner sides or where the stock tub meets the inner body shell (aproximatly where the rear seat sides/armrests mount).  The drivers side does have a vertical plate from quarter panel to trunk side wall but it is only to protect the gas filler hose and brace the gas filler box.
  In essence you have a six foot long wheel well which in my opinion creates lift and is why the cars of Beachball Sanchez, John Edmonds, Neil Thompson, Gene Burkland and Bruce Geisler tried to negate the lift with ducting from beneath the car exiting thru the upper deck lid and below the  rear window.
  They also ran a ton of weight in the rear but remember, they were not allowed front air dam's or rear spoilers and sat pretty high in the air.
  Those guy's and a few others were and still are my hero's from my earlist reading of Hot Rod Magazine in 1959, and when I first visited Speedweek in 1995 I knew I was going home and build a Studebaker.....................  and that's how I spent my fortune...............
p.s. see 2012 rule book page 70, paragraph 2, sentance 2.
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« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 01:06:22 AM by Bob Drury » Logged

Bob Drury
John (Maryland)
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« Reply #122 on: February 28, 2013, 07:02:00 AM »

Bob.

That is why the good Lord made nuts and bolts.

What number is your Studebaker?   Same with this car, spend some quid.

R.
John.
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Bob Drury
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« Reply #123 on: February 28, 2013, 11:39:12 AM »

   John, A/CFALT #394.
  I got to thinking about your car after my last post and if you were to run it on the salt, you could probably go thru tech (which is mainly Safety oriented) and even run the car as it is.
  The only drawback would be if you qualified for a record you would have to throw away that run (or waste your time going to impound, and waste their time tossing you out), then remove the "outer" tub pieces and requalify.
  Anyway, you have done a beautiful job and your car looks great.                              Bob
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Bob Drury
John (Maryland)
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« Reply #124 on: February 28, 2013, 01:15:21 PM »

Bob.

I can make the connection now!  I am most familiar with your car having looked at it numerous times to get some pointers - thanks.  Nice work, hope to see it run someday! 

Intererstingly, the San Chez Studebaker was the inpetus for me, never dreamed I would have one.

Anyways, back to the shop, we are working on the car full time, oil tank, lines, radiator, linkage, brakes, headers - we are getting a lot done, hope to buy the clutch this week.   

R.
John.
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jimmy six
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« Reply #125 on: February 28, 2013, 06:22:27 PM »

Just an observation on the air ducts behind the rear window. When you get to 185 and it spins remind yourself it might have been a good idea. At one time many years ago I believe they were "almost" mandatory on Studebakers. I realize this was before the front airdams so you may be just fine. At that time picnic tables were also not allowed on the trunk either. Studies and roadsters did a lot of spinning back then. Roadsters still do.

Make sure when test yourself in the car with your firesuit and arm restraints on that you can reach everything you want especially overhead. Not only will the inspectors at Bonneville check to see that even your fingers stay within the plane of the roll cage the starter will too. In an accident it's planned that the doors will be gone and you need to keep everything on you body inside that plane. I would advise you to practice getting out (pretending there was an emergency) many times in a complete suit with your restraints very tight. We have all found out how tight a starter can put you in when you thought everything was OK.

Car looks great....Run it and have fun..............

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John (Maryland)
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« Reply #126 on: February 28, 2013, 07:04:41 PM »

"Jimmy" 

Those are GOOD words you are passing on!  Thanks.

I do not think air vents are permitted in altered even if for safety.  I will keep you ideas in mind, your thoughts are appreciated! 

R.
John.
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Bob Drury
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« Reply #127 on: February 28, 2013, 08:01:37 PM »

  John, my first year watching at Speedweek (and before the creation of the Classic Classes) The Studebaker of Whitley and Turner ran minus the entire tail light assemblies to vent or exhaust the rear wheel wells.
  With the rule book sometimes difficult to decifer, I asked Mike Manghelli to clarify it (a few years back), and He told me that it is no longer allowed in the classic classes.
                                                                                                Bob Drury
p.s.  Listen to J.D. ............ he volunteered for many years as a Impound Inspector and has raced forever (sorry J.D.).
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Bob Drury
Glen
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« Reply #128 on: February 28, 2013, 08:06:44 PM »

John, it's a good idea to practice the bail outs in a dark garage so if you have a lot of smoke you can automatically go to the chutes levers, fire bottle etc.You don't have time to look for them.
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Glen
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« Reply #129 on: February 28, 2013, 08:22:35 PM »

There are different definitions for air vents and air ducts in the rule book. Air vents are prohibited, air ducts are not mentioned. They used to be allowed in gas coupe, I would ask Dan Warner or the commitee chair.
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« Reply #130 on: February 28, 2013, 08:58:13 PM »

  Which I practice every time I run.  Once I am belted in (usually three or four cars back from the starter) I have instructed the crew to not bother me with anything trivial and let me practice my mental "bail out".
  I base my Bail Out Scenario from the standpoint of the car being on fire:  In my case, Hit the Mag Kill Switch, Fuel Pump Shutoff, and Chutes.
  Next is to stay calm enough to not turn off the course until I am slow enough to not roll the car.
  The next step is THE MOST IMPORTANT AND MAY SAVE YOUR LIFE: DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES UNDO YOUR SAFETY HARNESS OR ANY OTHER RESTRAINTS UNTIL YOU ARE AT A DEAD STOP!
  Continuing along in my imaginary scenario, I undo my Harness, Head Restraint, Window/Door Net, Remove the Steering Wheel and open the Door to exit.
  What you don't want to do is Panic, and unless you drill this or a simillar sequence into your head, you may Die before the Safety Crew can reach you.
  This past October at the World Final's I lost the clutch at the Four mile mark (229 mph) and the car filled with smoke.
  Not knowing if I was on fire, I followed my practice proceedure and would have gotten off the course without incident had I not looked around for fire which resulted in my taking out the Five Mile Timers (Subaru happens real quick at over 200 mph............  at 250 you are going a football field a second so you ain't got time to pick your nose.......................                                              Bob
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Bob Drury
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« Reply #131 on: February 28, 2013, 09:26:17 PM »

that reads as very good advice in my opinion.
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bub '07 - 140.293 a/pg   120" crate street mill  
bub '10 - 158.100  sweetooth gear
lta  7/11 -163.389  7/17/11; 3 run avg.-162.450
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'16 -- 0 runs ; 0 events -- made a 2 state change in ZIP codes

" it's not as easy as it looks. "
                            - franey  8/2007
Kiwi Paul
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« Reply #132 on: March 01, 2013, 12:24:43 AM »

If you don`t want to start your bailout practice in a dark garage,have someone stand directly in front of the car, and make sure you look directly at them when you are reaching for the chute, firebottles and shutoff. Always a good idea to be able to to know where things are without having to put your head down and fumble around. When I do bailouts at the Salt, I try to have the driver look directly at me as they are doing this, before they physically exit the car. I also would rather somebody take a little extra time and make a smooth exit, rather than panicking/rushing and getting stuck or hurting themselves....
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John (Maryland)
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« Reply #133 on: March 01, 2013, 08:06:53 AM »

LSR IS DIFFERENT FROM OTHER FORMS OF RACING
 
In reading over the posts below, it strikes that this type information could be ready assessable in some form (if not already done so).  Safety information is most helpful to any racer especially the new folks. 

The experience level of many LSR folks is off the charts.

Safety information and tips could be combined to cover concepts and operating regimens for hauling safety; in-pit safety; understanding track conditions; safety check-out and readiness (would include vehicle walk-around and check-listing); in-run racing safety; and STOPPING safety.  In-run and stopping would include “tips and regimens” for accidents and trouble.

Many of us have been around racing a while and heard important safety comments that otherwise could not possibly be realized.  There are so many examples, e.g., the posts below! 

Other tips come to mind like the benefits of racing regimens and sequences specific to your vehicle rather than finding out later the hard way.  A new racer could not know the value of sequences until after a few incidents.  Put another way, one does not lift quick and jump on the brakes.  A friend checks the temperature of his trailer tires at rest stops to ensure the tires are not overheating.

Anyways, there are a few thoughts.

R.
John.
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Stainless1
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« Reply #134 on: March 01, 2013, 10:10:37 AM »

If you don`t want to start your bailout practice in a dark garage,have someone stand directly in front of the car, and make sure you look directly at them when you are reaching for the chute, firebottles and shutoff. Always a good idea to be able to to know where things are without having to put your head down and fumble around. When I do bailouts at the Salt, I try to have the driver look directly at me as they are doing this, before they physically exit the car. I also would rather somebody take a little extra time and make a smooth exit, rather than panicking/rushing and getting stuck or hurting themselves....

Corey sat in the car for hours, not only getting used to the confinement, but to get familiar with the controls and locations.  Pork Pie did not get as much time but still sat in over a couple of years to get familiar (we kept blowing it up just before it was his turn for a rookie pass).  Johnboy and I both talked with him about sequences and control familiarization.  The guy that did his bailout had him close his eyes, and then he called out the controls in random and had PP touch them several times... I was very impressed with that.  Then he had him show him the sequence of events for an emergency, and finally he closed the canopy and told him to get out. 
The main thing I think new guys need to know is there is not a (20 second) time limit to get out, like Paul, most inspectors want to see that you can do it efficiently, and quick enough to not be consumed in a fire or panic if a belt hangs up on the way out. 
It is for your own safety.... practice....practice....practice....practice....practice....practice....practice....practice....practice....practice....practice....  cheers
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Stainless
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MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.
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