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Author Topic: More shop safety  (Read 19684 times)
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tallguy
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« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2016, 02:41:13 AM »

Floydjer, regarding your original post that started this thread . . .

1.   I'm glad you weren't seriously injured in the incident.

2.   I'm a HUGE believer in eye protection in any kind of shop.

3.   Having been a weldor (not a spelling error) for decades, one of
     my habits, after closing the main valve of a high-pressure cylinder
     (for example, when done welding for the day), is to bleed gas from
     the hoses that feed the equipment (i.e., torch).  Then to unscrew
     the pressure adjustment knobs of the regulators, until the "output"
     gages read zero pressure.  This can help to ensure that no sudden
     blast of gas gets too far when the main valve of the high-pressure
     cylinder is opened (slowly is good) the next time.  I think this
     practice may also protect the regulators themselves, as well as
     everything downstream (hoses, fittings, torch).
« Last Edit: January 13, 2016, 02:44:35 AM by tallguy » Logged
fordboy628
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« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2016, 07:06:21 AM »

Floydjer, regarding your original post that started this thread . . .

3.   Having been a weldor (not a spelling error) for decades, one of
     my habits, after closing the main valve of a high-pressure cylinder
     (for example, when done welding for the day), is to bleed gas from
     the hoses that feed the equipment (i.e., torch).  Then to unscrew
     the pressure adjustment knobs of the regulators, until the "output"
     gages read zero pressure.  This can help to ensure that no sudden
     blast of gas gets too far when the main valve of the high-pressure
     cylinder is opened (slowly is good) the next time.  I think this
     practice may also protect the regulators themselves, as well as
     everything downstream (hoses, fittings, torch).


Excellent practice Tallguy.

Incidentally, and to no surprise, that is precisely the procedure that they teach in college level welding classes . . . . .

And in welding certification classes . . . . .

And what welding regulator mfg's recommend . . . . . . .

The amount of gases "lost" is cheap insurance against a "disaster".    I've witnessed a welding accident . . . . . don't want to see another.

 cheers
Fordboy
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