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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 520982 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #60 on: November 30, 2009, 01:46:50 AM »

Thanks for the compliment, Buzz.  This was my wife Rose's idea.  She said us old folks can build all of this stuff but young people do not have shop classes available in school and often no guys around to show them things.

The next few posts are on metal shaping.  Most auto repair uses hand held dollies that are placed behind or under the car body and the hammer is hit against the other side of the metal.  Bike work typically involves taking the part off and working on it on a bench.  On-the-body and bench work use different tools and methods.  Bench work is discussed here.  The November 2009 "BSH" (Back Street Heroes) magazine has an article showing how a fender is made using an arbor press.  Borders bookstore has these British magazines.

A shot bag and pear mallet are basic shaping tools.  First, a piece of metal is cut out larger than the finished part.  It will be trimmed to final size later.  The edges are smoothed so they will not cut or abrade the bag.  The metal should be wiped clean before it is pounded.  Dirt will harm the tools.

Sheet metal is rolled into size and it has some temper due to work hardening.  It can be shaped to some degree on a shot bag without annealing.  There will come a time when it no longer stretches and forms under the mallet.  It has work hardened and it needs to be heated and annealed.  This should be done as needed, between shaping sessions, until the piece has its final shape.  Shot bags wear out fast if the mallet swinger wails on them.  It is best to use moderate effort and lots of heat.  I always cool the part before I put it on the bag.

A big 16" by 16" shot bag works best for me.  I have not had much luck with the little ones, although a 12" by 12" model did work OK in the past.  I have not had good results with the real small ones.  Shot bags and pear mallets can be found at www.eastwood.com and www.hammersource.com

 


* Mallet_and_Bag.JPG (74.11 KB, 448x299 - viewed 208 times.)

* Smooth_Edges.JPG (81.32 KB, 427x336 - viewed 223 times.)

* Heat.JPG (78.18 KB, 406x336 - viewed 233 times.)

* Shaping.JPG (83.67 KB, 448x291 - viewed 214 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #61 on: December 03, 2009, 10:15:02 PM »

The finish hammer is used to make panels with very slight curvature.  It can make a very smooth panel if used with care.  In the past I used this method to hammer out some patch panels for a car fender.  The finish hammer has a very slight convex curvature on its round head.  Like all body work hammers, it should be used for body work, only.  Never strike the hammer directly against the anvil or dolly.

The backing can be an anvil, leather, or rubber.  It is good to experiment and see which works best for the metal and desired degree of curvature.  Leather, an anvil, and hard rubber were experimented with as backing for this panel.  This old piece of rubber conveyor belt worked best.  It provided the desired curve with hardly any hammer marks.

The first step is to cut the panel out to a size larger than the finished part.  It will be trimmed to size later.  I rarely anneal a part that is hammered to a slight curvature.  Usually I can get the curve I need without it.

Second, carefully hammer the part out.  Blows that are too heavy will leave rings.  Correct blows will leave small depressions.

Next, use a soft and flat rubber mallet to smooth out any imperfections.  The part can be trimmed, welded on and polished, or it can be lightly sanded and riveted on, as I have done with my panel.



 



* Peck and Finish.JPG (71.61 KB, 448x299 - viewed 216 times.)

* Hammer Work.JPG (88.65 KB, 448x299 - viewed 215 times.)

* Mallet Finishing.JPG (78.91 KB, 448x299 - viewed 230 times.)

* Panel.JPG (65.66 KB, 448x299 - viewed 223 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #62 on: December 07, 2009, 01:42:13 AM »

A knife like sheet metal edge can be dangerous in a crash or other mishap.  It is best to fold the edge over a wire so it is not sharp.  This is easy to do on straight edges but it is a challenge on curves.  Here is how I do it.  First, the piece is cut out oversize.  The black felt pin line on the photo shows where the edge will be after the piece is finished. 

Next, the bend is started with a pair of pliers.  The metal is stiff.  The edge is annealed with map gas and it is bent some more.  Finally, the edge is bent as far as possible with pliers.  Sometimes the part starts to curl like a potato chip.  I anneal the wire, too, so it is pliable.  I always use an aluminum wire with an aluminum panel.  Both the sheet and wire should be the same metal.  I stuff the wire into the trough.

Now it is time to use the peck hammer.  This is a pointy hammer with a flat spot on the tip about 1/8 inch wide.  I peck the edge down and trap the wire inside.  Finally, I anneal the edge with map gas and I flatten the part with the round head.  All of this work takes a gentle touch.       

   


* Cut Piece.JPG (69.96 KB, 448x299 - viewed 210 times.)

* Bending.JPG (55.42 KB, 448x299 - viewed 228 times.)

* Annealing.JPG (62 KB, 448x299 - viewed 221 times.)

* Peck.JPG (72.75 KB, 448x303 - viewed 207 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #63 on: December 07, 2009, 01:43:54 AM »

Two more photos.


* Pecking.JPG (72.28 KB, 448x292 - viewed 212 times.)

* Finishing.JPG (77.59 KB, 448x299 - viewed 229 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #64 on: December 16, 2009, 09:29:17 PM »

Is anyone familiar with the Hinckley Bonnevilles?  I need some help.

My plan was to install Carillo rods and 10.5 to 1 forged pistons this year.  No $$ for this.  Instead, I ordered another set of standard Triumph rods and 10.1 to 1 standard Triumph pistons.  My original set of rods and pistons has gone 20,000 street miles and ten runs down the salt and they look fine, but I am concerned about fatigue.  Hopefully the new standard parts will keep me racing for a few more years.

I gear the bike to run between 7,000 and 8,000 rpm flat out with 7,500 rpm being the target.  Does anyone have more experience with this?  Am I being too conservative?  Or, am I lucky that I have not blown the thing apart?

 

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« Reply #65 on: December 16, 2009, 09:36:52 PM »

You might contact Jon Minonno or Ed Mabry, they know more about LSR Triumphs than anybody.

  Fred
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« Reply #66 on: December 18, 2009, 11:11:38 PM »

Wobbly, I comend you for doing a great job on your build site.  I am in the same position financially as alot of other guys who make their living selling aftermarket accessories and race parts......along with everyone else, so spending a little money this year is the same as spending alot of money last year.  I enjoy reading on how you do things....alot of wisdom.  I did all the metal work on my roadster starting with a totally junk body fished out of a dumpster and the frame from a old circle track racer....when I picked them up, both of the former owners just laughed and scratched their heads.  I scrounged the doors and built the deck lid and lower deck lid panel from scratch.  I want to skin the deck lid and louver it for looks, but haven't gotten good enough to do it yet....out of steel.  I learned alot hammer welding the body back together and straightening the frame.  I haven't done much aluminum work, but hammered out the tonneau cover last year, hamering it around the edge of the body, gently so I didn't bend the already painted bodywork.  I built my hood by bending it over the edge of a door piled up with steel with foam on the edges to get the right bend on the top, and made patterns for the sides and had them bent at a fab shop.  Thanks for the great bloog and great ideas.....Keep It Up!  Bill
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« Reply #67 on: December 19, 2009, 12:58:47 AM »

As we progress with 2 II we will be spending a lot of time revisting yours and Willies sights over and over---thanks for taking the time to show us how to GITER done!!!!!!
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« Reply #68 on: December 20, 2009, 02:03:40 PM »

Its nice to see folks scrounging and fabricating.  There would be a lot fewer people racing if we did not do this.  My brother made driveable cars by welding together good parts of wrecked ones and I know how much work it is.  A lot.

The way I do things is not the best.  Instead it is based on some personal limitations.  I have only one good eye and I have poor depth perception when I am welding.  I simply cannot weld the thin 0.020 aluminum sheet.  Thick sheet that I can weld will make things too heavy.  Thus, the pop rivets.  My basement is really crowded.  A person with room in their shop can fabricate an english wheel to roll out the metal.  I typed "english wheel' onto the internet a while ago and saw all sorts of wheels and there was enough info for me to make the frame, at least.  Nice smooth curves like those on Marlo Triet's liner look like wheel work, but I do not know for sure.  Welding equipment and a wheel are good investments for a serious fabricator.

There are a few more sheet metal hammering posts on their way after I redo the pipes in the basement.  We had a lot break during the freeze.  I bypassed the breaks with garden hoses and parts from a defunct fish aquarium.  Cold water comes out of some hot faucets and vice versa.  It looks like a permanent fix to me and I can get back to working on the bike.  Unfortunately, the building inspection folks and my family have other ideas and I am redoing everything according to code.  The house is a hundred years old and the pipes are rusted up and funky.  There are some lead drain pipes.  I am keeping the lead and wrought iron drains for historical preservation and redoing everything else in new materials.     
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« Reply #69 on: December 21, 2009, 02:50:28 PM »

Three words......

Relocate
Relocate
Relocate

It never snows (or gets cold) in Nevada or California)  grin

I'm afraid if I lived up there I'd not get anything done come winter time.

Anyway hang in there and keep warm.  See you in the spring thaw....

Buzz
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« Reply #70 on: January 24, 2010, 07:14:29 PM »

The end is in sight for the house repair.  It should be done in three weeks.  Then it will be time to torture innocent sheet metal and to redo the engine.  South Bay Triumph sent the cams out to be ground into the "316" profile.

There is a good article on South Bay Triumph's land speed record attempts and success at the 2009 BUB Trials in this month's (January) Motorcycle Sport and Leisure, a British magazine.  Alan Cathcart wrote the piece and he set the world records.  There is a lot of good info in there for anyone who races a Hinckley twin.

Team Go Dog, Go! is not mentioned in the article.  The Bonnie is the blue and white T-100 in one of the photos and I am the guy in the black shirt talking to an older gent.  The Bonneville is described as Tom Mellor's bike.  Tom's bike is much nicer than mine and it is #240.  Tom has had an influence on the Bonnie.  The fairing work done a few months ago is based on his advice. 
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« Reply #71 on: January 24, 2010, 07:59:53 PM »

Right.......Relocate.....Relocate.......We go to Wrightwood, CA (in the mountains) during the summer.........
Go Apache Junction AZ. in the winter........and if we want rain we go to Hilversum, in the Netherlands.......
Hey, it's only money and you can't take it with you....................(Kent told me that...so I believe him).....

PS. Good luck with your Tri...........I have a Triple, and it is a great bike.......I also have a couple of "old"
Tri. Twins (1954....1966) for SALE for you Tri. lovers.....................................................................
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« Reply #72 on: January 24, 2010, 10:52:37 PM »

bak, can you send me some brownies next time your out there...?

im always much happier with their recipe.........than mine...
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« Reply #73 on: January 24, 2010, 11:35:33 PM »

Yes, Joea......they know how to make them over there.....Health Food................................................
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« Reply #74 on: January 25, 2010, 12:54:29 AM »

bak, can we still buy 16-inch motorcycle tires for wire wheels, vintage sidecar type stuff? 
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