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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 519058 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #375 on: February 03, 2011, 11:10:18 PM »

Welding rods made from scraps and a flat tipped soldering gun were my plastic fixing essentials for many years.  This hokey method works to some degree.  Awhile ago I bought various materials and a Model 5600HT Mini-Weld Model 6 Airless Plastic Welder from Urethane Supply Company www.urethanesupply.com  A book was purchased from a local store, too.  It is published by Whitehorse Press and it is "How to Repair Plastic Bodywork" by Kurt Lammon ISBN 1-884313-37-X.  Proper tools and materials make for an easier and better quality job.  They are worth the cost.

The first task is to identify the plastic.  Some, like polyethylene, and easy to recognize.  This airbox plastic is not.  It could be one of many types.  It is time for the melt and sniff test.  Dents are melted in an unobtrusive area of the airbox.  The melting plastic has a distinctive smell.  Various welding rods are melted, too.  The odors are compared.  Melting airbox and TPO rod have a similar stink.  The plastic is identified.  It is a good idea to have a full selection of welding rods for identification purposes.

A weld contaminated by the wrong plastic can be weak or discolored.  The welder tip is cleaned by brush and drill and Gretchen is showing how.  The welder is cold so she will not be burned.  In practice it is hot when cleaned. 


* Sniff Test Dents.JPG (63.82 KB, 448x318 - viewed 180 times.)

* Plastic Welding Rods.JPG (93.65 KB, 448x299 - viewed 186 times.)

* Brush Clean.JPG (89.33 KB, 420x336 - viewed 170 times.)

* Drill Clean.JPG (77.65 KB, 448x330 - viewed 173 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #376 on: February 05, 2011, 12:31:50 AM »

The airbox has stripped female threads for a screw.  The screw hole is chamfered into a cone shape using an X-acto knife.  The base of the cone is on the outside in the direction away from the screw head.  A small piece of aluminum tape is placed between the airbox body and lid to prevent welding the lid to the body.  It is hidden in the photo.

TPO rod is pushed into the hole in the welder.  It is white and some is barely visible in the photo.  The rod melts and oozes through the hole and down into the melted plastic in the weld.  The welder is pushed around to mix the rod with the airbox plastic.  Sometimes I use a rod that is a different color than the base material.  This makes it easier to see when everything is mixed.

The last photo shows the complete weld.  The center shows the white color of the unmixed rod.  This is not a problem.  It will be drilled out.  Some trimming and finishing will be used to remove the extra plastic and the repair will be undetectable.


* Stripped Threads.JPG (63.59 KB, 428x336 - viewed 175 times.)

* Chamfering Hole.JPG (87.74 KB, 448x322 - viewed 155 times.)

* Melting in Rod.JPG (78.68 KB, 389x336 - viewed 154 times.)

* Filled Hole.JPG (73.04 KB, 440x336 - viewed 174 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #377 on: February 07, 2011, 01:14:22 AM »

A crack is welded in this post.  This repair procedure would be used to weld something new together.  The plastic is polyethylene.

Cracks in plastic are champfered just like cracks in metal.  A full depth "V" if all welding will be done from one side and two half depth "V" grooves if welding will be done from both sides.  Welding is hot and the welded area can sag.  Also, melted material will occasionally drip from the seam.  The stiff aluminum tape prevents this.  The red air scoop will be welded first from the back side.  The tape is put on the front side as shown in the photo.  Urethane Supply sells the tape.

The back side is welded in two passes.  Rod is melted into the weld during the first pass, any rod residue is cleaned from the welder, and a second pass is made to melt everything together.  The photo shows the second pass.  Note the spots of darker plastic.  This is overheated polyethylene and I try to minimize this as much as possible.

Polyethylene does not sand or polish well.  I cut the weld beads flush with the plastic surface with an X-Acto knife as shown.  The entire procedure will be repeated on the front side of the air scoop.

Awhile ago a fellow cleaned a weld area with brake cleaner and he welded the cleaned area.  Poisonous phosgene gas was produced and it almost killed him.  The lesson I learned is to use the proper cleaner.  The can in the photo is plastic cleaner.


* Aluminum Tape.JPG (82.39 KB, 348x336 - viewed 148 times.)

* Welding Backside.JPG (91.74 KB, 448x323 - viewed 158 times.)

* Trimming Bead.JPG (95.23 KB, 448x310 - viewed 173 times.)

* Plastic Cleaner.JPG (78.04 KB, 448x299 - viewed 179 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #378 on: February 09, 2011, 01:40:17 AM »

A piece of stainless steel screen is included with the welding kit as shown in the photo.  A small piece will be used when this broken polyethylene chain guard is welded together.  It is melted into the weld and it reinforces and strengthens the repair.

Large repairs are ugly when I initially do them.  The excess material is cut away with a knife.  Some rough spots and pits remain as shown in the photo.  A second welding session is done to fill the pits and to smooth out the rough spots.

This summarizes everything I know about welding plastic.

 


* Screen.JPG (106.32 KB, 448x299 - viewed 153 times.)

* Melting in Screen.JPG (81.26 KB, 448x329 - viewed 158 times.)

* First Attempt.JPG (85.75 KB, 448x316 - viewed 170 times.)
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bones
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« Reply #379 on: February 12, 2011, 08:26:07 PM »

Wobbly
       Been building 2 bikes with my son, one for me (500 Weslake) and one for him (yz 80 yamaha) He is now the offical team welder.
The learning curve is pretty steep at the moment.He gets a bit frustrated when I tell him to make a weld joint a neater fit.
I am having a great time teaching him and taking him to visit some of my racing mates. He seems to be enjoying it
I hope you and your daughter are having as good a time as Alex and I.
If all goes to plan I will bring the weslake to BUB.
Some shots of Alex and his bike
    


on the weslake.  chassis are similar
cheers   Bones
« Last Edit: February 12, 2011, 08:40:12 PM by bones » Logged
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #380 on: February 15, 2011, 10:38:54 PM »

That young fellow tucks in real nice and tight to that weslake.  He looks like he is ready to ride.  That is nice of you to work with him.  My wife calls these "precious moments."

We took the bike apart and the frame, swingarm, etc. went to the painter today.  It will be walnut shell blasted, epoxy primered, and painted with urethane or enamel.  I do not know which is best.  Any advice is appreciated.  The bike will be a trail bike and see occasional use on the salt.


* Crusty Crustacean.JPG (131.57 KB, 640x427 - viewed 161 times.)
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Geo
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« Reply #381 on: February 15, 2011, 11:21:11 PM »

Wobbly,

I like what you are doing with the bike.  All of them. Some ideas I can take and apply top my car work.  Thanks for posting all your thoughts. 

Love what you are doing with the children. That really makes me feel good and I apply the same principals to my child.  We do not work on the car much but spend time on science and math.

I have found the two part paint body shops use for accident repairs strong and any color can be mixed to match.

All the best,

Geo
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #382 on: February 16, 2011, 10:30:45 PM »

Science and math will help that girl.  A few years ago my oldest girl was in a college class and I had an hour or so to wait until she was done.  I wandered over to the engineering building.  The sight of it made me yawn and get a bit sleepy.  Inside, there were more ladies in the classes than guys.  They sat up front and looked interested.  Taking notes, too.  A big change.  When I was in engineering skool there were hardly any girls, nobody sat in the front row except for the occasional suckup, and in my case, I was not smart enough to listen to the lecture and write anything down at the same time.

The paint shop wanted paint codes.  I looked on the internet and found codes for Fire Red and Silver.  I gave these to the painter and I wandered around the shop looking at the cars-in-progress and the pictures on the wall.  Obviously these guys know what they are doing and more about paint than I do.  I said "Put on a good epoxy primer and the top coat that you think will work best.  This is not a show bike and it will be used on the trail and the salt at Bonneville.  The paint cost is a small part of the job.  Use the best.  Tell me when it is done and I will come down and get it."       
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Old Scrambler
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« Reply #383 on: February 18, 2011, 11:33:53 AM »

+1 on the paint directions....they are the professionals!  I am building a Triumph Cub and think I have the rules figured that I will be competing in Modified Chasis - Pushrod Gas so I think my number plates should read 250cc M-PG.  Thanks for all of your advice and special tips. I am a novice when it comes to motor building. I've restored a few bikes but thought a slow-speed attempt might be worthy of my effort.

Its great to work with your children! I learned a long time ago that I must have been brought up wrong!  I had been conditioned to STAND AND TAKE IT when voices are raised in anger or frustration.  My wife abruptly leaves those situations........so I have had to learn to teach our daughters to have patience and understanding.  Somehow they have turned out OK and seem to have the know-how of when to apply the appropriate response to a given situation. My youngest rides with me and is hoping to buy her own bike.
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2011 AMA Record - 250cc M-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 82.5 mph
2013 AMA Record - 250cc MPS-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 88.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc M-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 130.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc MPS-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 137.7 mph
Chasis Builder / Tuner: Dave Murre
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #384 on: February 19, 2011, 01:49:24 AM »

That number plate lettering seems OK.  There is a younger fellow from Iowa or Nebraska on this forum that is building a Tiger Cub or Terrier.  There have been some fast Tiger Cubs on the salt in the past.  This is an interesting project and I hope to meet you at BUB.

The British did lunar exploration just like the US.  This is a little known fact.  It was Wallace and Gromit.  Wallace is a cheese lover and he wanted to find out what the moon tasted like.  Their rocket technology has been a well kept secret until now.  Haynes, the technical manual publisher, has a new book that details all of the inner workings of the rocket including cutaway drawings and "meticulously researched detailed technical descriptions."  The February 2011 British magazine "The Classic Motor Cycle" has a little article about the book.  Wallace and Gromit, like many famous people and dogs, ride a Triumph.  There is an article in the same Classic Bike showing a recreation of their famous combination.

Team Go Dog Go has ordered a book.  Most things the team does are shown on the build diary, but not this.  Incorporating bits and pieces of space age technology into our build is best kept secret.  Listen for the big boom when the Triumph breaks the sound barrier.   


* Cracking Manual.JPG (162.9 KB, 640x344 - viewed 167 times.)

* Cracking Combination.JPG (167.48 KB, 640x372 - viewed 267 times.)
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charlie101
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« Reply #385 on: February 19, 2011, 02:54:37 AM »

I got to warn you Wobbly, dont put a penny in any gas stove and dont ever let the evil penguin get hold of your Techno Trousers! grin
« Last Edit: February 19, 2011, 03:22:12 AM by charlie101 » Logged
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #386 on: February 21, 2011, 12:45:55 AM »

I will remember that.

Is there a preservative to keep cast iron or steel brake drums and disks from rusting and not cause brake problems when they are used?  This will be used on a race bike that is stored in a humid climate during the winter. 
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Old Scrambler
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« Reply #387 on: February 22, 2011, 10:17:00 PM »

Paint the parts.........then soda blast and acetone for use.
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2011 AMA Record - 250cc M-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 82.5 mph
2013 AMA Record - 250cc MPS-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 88.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc M-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 130.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc MPS-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 137.7 mph
Chasis Builder / Tuner: Dave Murre
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #388 on: February 26, 2011, 12:48:38 AM »

It is a small fuzzy photo buried deep in an obscure publication.  For some strange reason, having this little picture in the B'ville News means as much to me as anything else I have done.


* BVILLE NEWS.jpg (159.97 KB, 800x576 - viewed 205 times.)
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Beairsto Racing
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« Reply #389 on: February 26, 2011, 03:08:48 AM »

Congrats Bo!!  cheers

I enjoy following your build diary, thanks for sharing your experience and skills. The info is always positive and I really like that you make it a family effort.
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