Landracing Forum Home
November 23, 2017, 11:44:35 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
BACK TO LANDRACING.COM HOMEPAGE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  


(Note: Donations are not tax deductible)







Live Audio Streaming and Archives of Past Events
Next Live Event: TBD
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 [23] 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 ... 197   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 520634 times)
saltwheels262, Paulin adelaide and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #330 on: December 06, 2010, 12:41:33 AM »

The rear section frame is partially built and I put it on the bike today.  The spine for the old rear is clamped to it.  This shows how much bigger the new rear is.  The seat pan is one I have been using for several years.  Every time I change the rear section I reuse it.  It is 3/16 inch thick aluminum.  The rest of the frame is 12 gauge with the exception of the thin angle shapes that the sheet metal is riveted to.  They are 1/16 inch thick.

My usual procedure is to cut the part out of the sheet and to temporarily rivet it onto the main assembly.  Then, I ask myself, is there metal I can remove to make this part lighter without compromising its strength?  Then I use the sawzall or hole saws to remove the metal.  Sometimes I will lighten the part and cover the holes with a riveted on piece of 0.012 inch thick roof flashing.  I have done this to cover the lightening holes on the seat back.

It is much easier to draw lines on paper than it is to make the parts out of metal.

 


* Tail Frame Front.JPG (226.94 KB, 640x427 - viewed 258 times.)

* Tail Frame Rear.JPG (216.22 KB, 640x427 - viewed 256 times.)
Logged
charlie101
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 57
Location: Sweden, way up north
Posts: 142


Indian 101 buff




Ignore
« Reply #331 on: December 06, 2010, 08:13:24 PM »

You didn't want to put more weight on the front wheel, thus not lenghtenen the swingarm more than a couple of inches, what about putting the tank back there and then you can lenghten the swingarm a bit more and still have the same weight on the front wheel and tuck even lower on the frame?
Logged
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #332 on: December 07, 2010, 01:11:06 AM »

That is an idea I will consider.  Thanks.
Logged
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #333 on: December 08, 2010, 01:06:20 AM »

Oil filters are a current forum topic.  The Mobil 1 M1-108 synthetic fiber blend filter fits this 790cc 2003 Triumph T-100 Bonneville.   The oil appears to be cleaner based on visual inspection, as compared to the paper filters.  There have been no filter related problems during street or racing use.  The oil is changed twice a year and the filter is renewed at every oil change.  The filter is filled with fresh oil before it is installed.
Logged
grumm441
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Wazavudu Bellytank Spirit of Sunshine Bellytank
Posts: 1401

HK 327




Ignore
« Reply #334 on: December 08, 2010, 08:37:18 AM »

My first and last attempt at web journalism.  http:www.motorcycleclassics.com/restoration-technical/sidewalk-motorcycle-tire-repair.aspx
   

WW
  Well you made that look easy
as Motorcycho said "Never seems that easy when I do it!"

And I've got a tyre machine
G
Logged

Chief Motorcycle Steward Dry Lakes Racers Australia Inc
Now with stars
I build it, Goggles tries his hardest to break it
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #335 on: December 12, 2010, 02:16:23 AM »

Grumm, in my earlier life I moved around a lot.  Many times I was the low seniority mechanic and the bottom guy on the totem pole.  Changing tires and cleaning bathrooms.  I did a lot of that.

Recently, my oldest girl graduated from college, bought a car, and got married.  She is on her honeymoon.  Soon she will be gone and starting a new life.  She was one of three children I have brought to Bonneville.  It was a big event for both of us and something she fondly talks about.  It is expensive to take a young person to the salt and they need attention.  This distracts one from the tasks at hand.  In hindsight, I never regret bringing a well mannered child with me.  Giving them this experience is worth any inconvenience.

A few years ago I was going to install new bright lights in the cave like Team Go Dog Go! workshop.  This would be a lot of money.  Lights, wiring, etc., and the electricity to power them.  I needed to buy performance parts and beer and the new brightness would destroy the cellar's romantic ambiance.  Instead, I bought this little headlight.  It uses LED bulbs and rechargeable batteries and a charge lasts a long time.  The light pivots.  I wear bifocals and I need to tilt my head to see things up close.  The pivot allows the light to be directed to where I am looking.  There is an intense spotlight setting and a wider floodlight setting.  All are useful.  The light is an Everready 6-bulb LED headlight.

The light makes it much easier to see when cutting sheet metal, drilling holes, and doing all sorts of machining tasks.  Also, it is good for under the truck jobs like changing u-joints.  My workmanship has noticeably improved.  All said, the light is a good investment. 


* Married and Off.JPG (158.67 KB, 640x427 - viewed 263 times.)

* Headlight.JPG (166.47 KB, 640x427 - viewed 303 times.)
Logged
grumm441
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Wazavudu Bellytank Spirit of Sunshine Bellytank
Posts: 1401

HK 327




Ignore
« Reply #336 on: December 12, 2010, 02:38:12 AM »

WW
Electricity isn't a problem here, as I have a 2kw of solar on the roof, and it doesn't really get to freezing here so it seems I'm always in credit. I only recently started wearing reading glasses as I found my arms were too short for me to read.
Beer and scotch, brew my own.
Taking children to the salt, the Rev and Dr Googles generally go in the same car, not mine and pay for themselves.
Since being an apprentice I've generally been the head mechanic, and usually the only mechanic. Most of the stuff I worked on until I joined the motorcycle trade, didn't have tyres, it had tracks. Changing tyres. I'm used to using a machine. Got one at work and one at home. but tube type tyres (Aus spelling) Arrrrrggggggghhhhh

G
Logged

Chief Motorcycle Steward Dry Lakes Racers Australia Inc
Now with stars
I build it, Goggles tries his hardest to break it
gearheadeh
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 56
Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
Posts: 299





Ignore
« Reply #337 on: December 12, 2010, 09:13:29 AM »

Hey W.W.
I don't know about everybody else but I do make a point of reading your thread. For the reason that you are not too shy to bring up anything and everything that might be interesting.  cheers
Logged

40 is the old age of Youth, 50 is the young age of the Senior years.
RidgeRunner
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Location: Ashfield, in the Territories of Western Massachusetts
Posts: 718




Ignore
« Reply #338 on: December 12, 2010, 12:03:07 PM »

Hey W.W.
I don't know about everybody else but I do make a point of reading your thread. For the reason that you are not too shy to bring up anything and everything that might be interesting.  cheers

+1

   Ed
Logged
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #339 on: December 15, 2010, 01:05:28 AM »

This afternoon I looked out of the window where I work and saw a big dark thunderstorm a few miles away.  It looked like a nasty one.  Inside, where I could not see, there was a tornado.  It trashed a neighboring town and crossed over a highway.  Our district maintenance crew took these photos when they cleaned a barn off of the roadway.

Curves drawn on paper are cut out of metal when I make the tail section.  First, I draw the curve on a piece of graph paper.  In this example I use graph paper with a 10 square per inch grid and I draw the tail section on it using a 1 to 10 scale.  In other words, 1 inch on the graph paper equals 10 inches on the metal.

The metal and the drawing will be measured during subsequent steps.  A good ruler is essential.  I keep a nice clean one on the drafting table and the other one is in the shop.  The one shown is a Starrett No. C316R with 32nds and 64th of an inch graduations on the back and 50th and 100th of an inch graduations on the front.  The graduation marks are a style that is popular in the aircraft industry.  They are very easy to read and this is my favorite.

 


* Aumsville Tornado.jpg (60.5 KB, 640x480 - viewed 234 times.)

* Aumsville Twister.jpg (69.5 KB, 640x480 - viewed 223 times.)

* Drawing and Tools.JPG (211.69 KB, 800x533 - viewed 243 times.)
Logged
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #340 on: December 17, 2010, 12:18:52 AM »

The part is drawn to scale on paper in the last post.  The metal is selected and a square or rectangle is made with tape around the area to be cut.  The tape is marked with graduations.  In this example I mark every inch on the the tape.  A grid is drawn across the part with a pencil.  The grid on the metal is a full size version of the grid on the paper.  It is ten times bigger.  One tenth inch on the paper equals one inch on the metal.

Now I look at the part on the paper and note where the part edge crosses the grid lines.  I mark those crossing points on the grid on the metal with dots of white-out.  The little dots do not make a perfect line.  They seldom do.  They give me a good enough idea of the part shape.  A flexible wood strip is placed over the dots and it is bent to resemble a smooth curve.  A line is drawn along the stick.  This represents the part edge.  Blue masking tape is placed on one side of the line and tan on the other.  This makes the line easy to see.  The part is sawed out of the sheet.


* Line on Grid.JPG (132.08 KB, 640x427 - viewed 218 times.)

* Curve Cut.JPG (160.92 KB, 640x427 - viewed 220 times.)
Logged
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #341 on: December 20, 2010, 01:03:07 AM »

A drill press used as a milling machine is shown on previous posts.  The very low price of this Chinese made Shop Fox vise was too tempting.  I bought it and I use it for milling.  It makes the job much easier.

This project is to make a nice polished billet aluminum tail piece for the new rear streamlining.  The cut outline is marked with punches.  It will be easy to see during the milling.  Two wires are placed at the top of the jaw faces to tilt them inwards.  This keeps the piece from moving upward during the machining process.  The vise is securely bolted to the table.  Plunge cuts are used to mill out the cavity in this part.  The feed screws turn during the machining process unless they are held in place.  I use bungee cords for this.

This third world method is great if a person is in no hurry.  The entire setup is not designed for milling and it is not very rigid.  Shallow cuts with a slow feed rate in aluminum are OK.  Deep cuts, high feed rates, and ferrous metals are best cut on a milling machine.  Accurate work is possible with patience and practice.

 


* Shop Fox 1.JPG (146.95 KB, 640x427 - viewed 260 times.)

* Shop Fox 2.JPG (191.17 KB, 640x427 - viewed 245 times.)
Logged
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #342 on: December 26, 2010, 01:59:00 AM »

It was time for them to go.  Old cabinetmaker and machinist tools covered by that dark thin hard rust of use and time.  Rulers with the numbers wore off and knobs with the knurling gone.  Tools I used for more than half of my life, and my father and his father, too.  My son, Josef, called me to say they are hanging on his shop wall and I could hear his son, Maximus, in the background.  A box of rusty old tools.
Logged
wobblywalrus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 64
Location: backwoods Oregon
Posts: 4446





Ignore
« Reply #343 on: January 04, 2011, 04:06:47 PM »

The new tail section build is progressing.  This is tedious work with a lot of hours spent before any significant progress is made.  The next few posts will describe some of the revisions.

General rules for partial streamlining are given by Bradley in Chapter 4 of his book.  One says "The area behind the rider's legs should be filled out but this is limited by access and regulations."  The first picture is a fuzzy enlargement showing me sitting on the bike.  The picture was taken by Ray the Rat.  Note the space behind my leg.  I need some room around my legs to paddle around and to put my leg down to hold up the bike, but I do not need this much.  The second photo shows the finished bottom half of the new tail section.  The loose plate on the side is from the old tail.  This illustrates how the area behind the legs can be filled.


* Gap Behind Leg.jpg (127.51 KB, 510x480 - viewed 212 times.)

* Gap Filled.JPG (146.45 KB, 640x449 - viewed 199 times.)
Logged
Dr Goggles
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 167
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 2960


The Jarman-Stewart "Spirit of Sunshine" Bellytank


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #344 on: January 04, 2011, 05:18:11 PM »

just wondering if you ever saw this post Wobster.

http://www.landracing.com/forum/index.php/topic,3553.0.html
Logged

Few understand what I'm trying to do but they vastly outnumber those who understand why...................

http://thespiritofsunshine.blogspot.com/

Current Australian E/GL record holder at 215.041mph

THE LUCKIEST MAN IN SLOW BUSINESS.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 [23] 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 ... 197   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page November 08, 2017, 07:44:13 AM