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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 521290 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2685 on: January 16, 2017, 12:38:40 AM »

The Italian Arrow pipes are of a quality I cannot duplicate.  They do not have optimal dimensions as per tube diameters, although they are good in other respects.  The mile bike pipes are made from materials I can find and put together using methods I can match - sort of.  What I need is to build a complete exhaust system using the routing of the Arrow pipes, the general style of fabrication of the mile bike pipes, with the dimensions from the Dynomation work.

The first step is to weld together some step header pipes with 1.386 beginning diameter, 1.5 inch mid section diameter, and 1.75 inch end section diameter.  This taper is critical to get a few ponies near 8,000 rpm where they are badly needed.  No problemo, seņor.  All I need to do is buy the tubing, buy a welder, learn how to weld with it, and melt everything together.   
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4-barrel Mike
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« Reply #2686 on: January 16, 2017, 12:57:32 AM »

Bo, you planning stainless for the exhaust?

Mike
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« Reply #2687 on: January 16, 2017, 11:10:00 AM »

Bo.........take a look at Hindle (sold through Ripple Rock in Canada) for SS exhaust ideas.........minimal welding......and adjustable.  Remember to wash SS with acetone before starting the motor wink
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2011 AMA Record - 250cc M-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 82.5 mph
2013 AMA Record - 250cc MPS-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 88.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc M-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 130.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc MPS-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 137.7 mph
Chasis Builder / Tuner: Dave Murre
wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2688 on: January 16, 2017, 11:25:22 AM »

Bends and parts from Burns Stainless...their biggest selection is in 303.

A long time ago I left home on my BSA A-65 with a remington revolver, a down filled paratrooper sleeping bag, some tool and other junk, and a few hundred bucks.  A couple of years filled with drugs, dope, booze, wemon of all types, wemon who were actually men, and all sorts of mayhem followed.  Circumstances led to me having to take a job high in the Sierra Nevada as a professional welder.  It was at a gold mine with this foreman with one and a half legs.  Just him and me.  The mine owner was this rich doctor in the San Francisco Bay area who had this gold mine as a tax write-off.  The old guy scrounged scrap from all sorts of abandoned mines and it was piled all over the place.  It had to be made into a working mine by a certain date or the doc would get in trouble with the tax guys.

Nobody stayed at this job very long.  I lived in a mine shack all alone except when the old guy was there I was fabricating or operating heavy equipment.  Life sucked big time.  It was cold and lonely.  I faked being a serious drug addict on the mend to justify my lack of talent and inability to recall my past and it was not far from the truth.

I knew how to gas weld.  The welders were stick arcs powered by flathead V-8's.  They would rev on and off of their speed governors when I struck and broke arcs.  Since I never touched a arc welder and knew nothing about it, some quick learning happened quickly.  The electrodes were bundled in little boxes with paper describing the welding procedures for them.  I took them home and read them in my little shack by lantern light.  Most of the carp on them was in some sort of egyptian that a welder could understand.  I got enough info to melt the scrap together into a mine.  There were times where the old guy was holding onto my feet while I hung upside down and welded.  A lot of the electrodes were sorta laying around and I just picked them up and used them.  That would be my eventual downfall.

The mine was ready to go.  It was a Monday morning.  The doc showed up at the mine.  I was in town doing something to my BSA.  I showed up late.  It was like the groom being late for the wedding.  We had a dump truck full of rock.  I backed it up the ramp and dumped it into the tipple.  The old guy turned on the water and it flowed through the flumes and sluices.  Proudly I yanked open the gate and the rock poured in.  The sluices were jiggling and everything was primo.  Then, my flippin' welds started to break.  Critical ones.  The non important ones worked great.  The setup fell apart right in front of us.  Inappropriate rod selection was the culprit.

My final paycheck was written on the spot.  It was a big one.  I could't spend much money on the side of that mountain and the doc was not around often so I had a bunch of pay due.  A rich hippie with a down filled sleeping bag, remington revolver, and A-65 headed out.  In town I got one of my friends drunk, sold him my bus, and moved back to the low country where I met Rose.  Our first date was on the A-65.

That is why I never got a welder and would not get one now, except I need that horsepower.  The memories.  It will not be a stick welder, for sure.  

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Peter Jack
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« Reply #2689 on: January 16, 2017, 12:38:17 PM »

Bo, if you're going to weld up an exhaust system you need tig. It just happens that a tig also makes a good stick welder. If you're going to buy a tig, get one that can do aluminum too. If you don't you'll definitely regret going a little cheaply a little later down the road. You'll be able to learn how to weld, both stick and tig pretty easily. There are lots of good sources for learning how on the internet. I'd use "Welding Tips and Tricks" to start. There are lots of bad sites, but they're generally pretty obvious. I recommend getting one of the brand name American built machines because it's much easier to get service and repairs. The local welding supply store can be your best friend.

If you have any questions PM me.

I've been able to help several people on this site get up to speed with their welding.


Pete
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« Reply #2690 on: January 23, 2017, 09:56:20 PM »

The TIG process looks to be severely mental with the need for multi-limbed coordination.  Uggh.  The MIG process seems to be a good place to start.  A TIG welder might be a future project after I figure out the basics of FCAW and GMAW.  This Millermatic 211 is a very popular welder in this area and it had a $100 rebate.  The next project is to build a welding table and welder cart.  The steel dealer is cutting the plates for the table and Rose is getting them tomorrow.  These two books have lots of info.


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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2691 on: January 26, 2017, 10:34:45 PM »

The ripple rock pipes from Canada are not made for Bonnevilles.  It looks like I need to make them.

A lot of the 110 volt wiring in the house I did using 12 gauge Romex for the wire with 20 amp circuit breakers and components.  That type of wiring is simple and the system is stout.  The 220 volt wiring was done by Rose's carpenter buddies when they built the shed.  The welder instructions describe the 220 power supply and show some pictures of what should be in the breaker box.  The things the guy's installed look different and some parts in the picture are not there.  Prudence says it is best to use the welder on 110 current until a genuine electrician checks out the 220 volt supply.

The Arrow headers will be used as a pattern.  They have the right dimensions, basically.  The only differences with the new pipes will be a three step header, a larger collector pipe diameter, and a different taper on the megga.  Burns stainless makes the parts I need in 16 gage 304 stainless.  They do not have everything in the other materials like 321 stainless, 18 gage 304, or mild steel.  There will be slip joints where the headers join the collector and where the megga connects to the other end of the collector.

These arrow pipes use bend angles besides 15, 45, and 90 degrees.  Bends in those three angles will be ordered and there will be some lobsterback work to get the same angles as the Arrow pipes.  I want to keep the lobsterback to a minimum although the entire system could be made that way.  That method takes a lot of time and effort and its acoustic characteristics are questionable.   
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« Reply #2692 on: January 26, 2017, 11:06:18 PM »

If you're planning on welding stainless with the mig Bo be sure you're using the right shielding gas and wire in the machine. Your local welding supply store should be able to set you up correctly. Be sure you use enough heat and if necessary pulse the mig with your trigger finger to get the result you need.

Pete
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2693 on: February 01, 2017, 12:54:19 AM »

It is windy here a lot so it would be hard to weld outside and to maintain a gas shield around the electrode.  The shield gas would blow away.  The storage shed I am building is a lot longer than the boat and trailer in it so there is room for a small welding shop near the door.  A door was made and hung last weekend and the other one will be finished this weekend.  The door is lined with sheet metal and the walls will be, too.

Electrical current is 110 volts from a 50-foot long extension cord.  The gas I have is 75% argon and 25% carbon dioxide.  The wire is 0.030 ER308/308L.  The metal is 16 gage 304 stainless and the welder is a Miller 211 MIG.  Does this appear to be reasonable?

The guy at the welding shop says I need to get the 220 volt power source sorted so I can get higher quality welds.  The welder will work on 220 V too.  Is it a good idea to postpone this pipe building project until the 220 volt power supply is working? 


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4-barrel Mike
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« Reply #2694 on: February 01, 2017, 02:18:07 AM »

Bo, start learning on cheap material.  I wouldn't weld anything important with my Lincoln SP-135 at the end of a 50' extension cord. 

PM me with a phone #, I can drag my light-weight machine down there and give some basic lessons. I have lots of scrap I can bring.  I have a stainless gas bottle and wire for my machine that I used to fix a mal-placed s/s gad tank inlet for an old hot rod, long gone.

Don't pizz away money needlessly.

I'm a fair-to-middlin' MIG welder sometimes.  Initial rough weld of Jeep top into '30-31 Model A Tudor sedan:





Mike
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« Reply #2695 on: February 01, 2017, 09:09:13 AM »

I googled mig welding stainless steel and came up instantly with a bunch of good information on both the Lincoln and Miller web sites. They had a bunch of information specific to small machines.

Don't start out working on your project Bo. Get some scrap stainless pipe and practice first. You may want to look into back purging. I use that all the time when I'm tig welding stainless. You want to be sure that the inside of the welds are smooth in an exhaust system.

Pete
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2696 on: February 01, 2017, 11:59:14 PM »

Thanks for the advice.  I needed some second opinions on a few things and you gave me those.  The shop will be wired correctly and finished before the pipes are fabricated.  It will take me a few months to do this.

Rose and me were down at the local having dinner and more than a few pints.  We walked out the door and saw it parked across from the pub entrance.  A most exquisite and rare automobile, between 30 and 40 years old and in excellent original condition.  It is something I never knew existed.  Ferraris and Lamborginiis are common fodder compared to it.  Rose took some pictures with her Kindle.  We will get one of our kids to figure out how to download them.  I will photo shop them so they look good and post them. 
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2697 on: February 02, 2017, 07:27:13 PM »

The breaker box I looked into last week was in the house cellar.  The breakers for the wires going to the shed were not there.  This morning I remembered that there is an electrical box door hidden behind where I hang up my leathers and bike riding jacket.  Voila! The breaker box for the shed it is.  The wires going from the house to the shed are plenty stout stranded wires.

The welder book says the wires should be 14 gauge, minimum.  The 110 V lighting circuit has 14 gage and the outlet circuit has 12 gage.  The 220 V outlet circuit has stranded wires a lot bigger than 14 gage.  Both the 220 and 110 V circuits have plenty big wire.

The welder book says the 110 V circuit should have a 15 or 20 amp fuse or circuit breaker.  It has a 20 amp breaker so this is OK.  The book says the time delay fuse for the 220 V circuit needs to be 25 amp or if it is a normal operating fuse it is 30 amp.  What amp breaker should I use in for the 220 V outlet, 25 or 30 amp?  It seems the 50 amp breakers in there now are too big.


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« Reply #2698 on: February 02, 2017, 08:46:12 PM »

The values in the book are minimums. The 220 volt outlet for the welder will likely be a 50 amp rated outlet although it's quite possible a lower rated outlet will be suitable for that machine. It never hurts to have a larger capacity circuit for a welder. In my case I use a 100 amp circuit for my big tig. The machine is capable of drawing 89 amps and when welding heavy aluminum I have been known to blow the old 70 amp breaker. in theory my machine should be hard wired into a box.

That's a long winded way of saying the 50 amp circuit is great. In this case bigger is better. You won't ever blow a breaker.

Pete
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #2699 on: February 02, 2017, 11:58:29 PM »

It looks like there is plenty of 'lectricity.  That is great.
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