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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 520141 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #240 on: August 20, 2010, 01:29:39 AM »

I wish that I knew what I am doing.  The verdict is still out on the carbs.  A bad ground and maybe the kinked line caused trouble.  The bike starts four out of five times now and I am still working on the problem.  These are very good racing carbs if the starting problem is overlooked.  I do not want to give up on them.  These carb issues are minor compared to the tire problems at Speedweek.  Those shredded racing tires are scary.  I sure hope the experts figure out a solution.

The flatslides came with #135 Keihin hex main jets.  I want to have more jets in different sizes so I can rejet as needed on the salt.  I bought a pairs of 128's, 130's, 132's, 138's, 140's and 142's.  The local Honda shop sold me these.  They pulled them out of a plastic box with little compartments just like almost any other bike dealer in America. 

I laid the jets out in pairs in order from smallest to biggest.  Then I got out some saddlemaker's needles.  All sewing shops have some big needles like these.  I slid the jets onto the needle and used my thumb as an indicator of how far up the needle that they slid.  Bigger jets slide further up the needle.

Genuine Keihin jets have a little "K" next to the number and the number is marked on the side.  A pair of these jets had "128" stamped on the ends and no "K."  They slid up the needle farther than the Keihin 130's.  Obviously, they were too big.  They went into the reject pile.  Two jets said "AB142" and they had no "K"s.  They seemed to be the right size.  They slid farther up the needle than the Keihin 140's.  I put them in the good pile.  One jet marked "140RD" slid up the needle as far as a Keihin #142.  It was too big.  Another jet marked "130" was one size too small.  The rejects are shown in the bottom of a photo and the good jets on the top.  This trick was showed to me by a tuner years ago. 



* Jets and Needles.JPG (90.02 KB, 448x263 - viewed 156 times.)

* Jet on Needle.JPG (69.72 KB, 408x336 - viewed 166 times.)

* Thumb on Needle.JPG (71.63 KB, 404x336 - viewed 192 times.)

* Good and Bad.JPG (102.03 KB, 448x330 - viewed 166 times.)
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55chevr
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« Reply #241 on: August 20, 2010, 04:41:10 AM »

Have you considered rollers ... they make it a lot easier to start cantankerous bikes ... Joe
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #242 on: August 21, 2010, 01:14:55 AM »

Joe, it starts every time now.  I learned the special secret procedure.  Now I can leave it parked with the key in it.  No one except me can start it.  I am going to learn about roller starters at the BUB meet.  Maybe Harbor Freight has one that I can afford.
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Bruin
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« Reply #243 on: August 24, 2010, 10:55:09 PM »

Nice tip with the needle for checking no-name jets. I've run into the same thing with K vs non-K jets. They are rare as hens teeth in our understocked bike shops so STD might have to make doo with some itty bitty drill bits. See ya at BUB.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #244 on: August 25, 2010, 01:26:54 AM »

Bruin, we learned the same thing.  The original equipment Keihin jets are the right sizes.  It is the pattern jets made by others that are off.

These folks send me genuine jets with very quick shipment:  PJ Motorsports at PJMOTORSPORTS.com 
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #245 on: August 27, 2010, 11:24:55 PM »

A few final finishing touches.  I grabbed one trailer wheel and shook it to check for bearing play.  The wheel moved a lot.  One of the U bolts holding the axle to the leaf spring corroded and broke.  Salt termites at work.  It was late and only the hardware store was open.  I bought some rod and made a new u-bolt.  I am very glad that I found this problem in the driveway and not on the way to B-Ville.  Rosie gave me a navy hair cut and beard trim.  Plenty short.  This makes it more comfortable out on the salt.  A couple of braces make the Triumph front fender a lot stronger.  They were added after reading about JimL's experiences at Speedweek.  All done and time for bed.  As Bob Dylan says, "The Titanic sails at dawn."



   


* U Bolt.JPG (98.01 KB, 448x299 - viewed 182 times.)

* Fender Brace.JPG (77.9 KB, 448x299 - viewed 175 times.)

* Titanic.JPG (74.83 KB, 448x299 - viewed 180 times.)
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JimL
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« Reply #246 on: August 28, 2010, 12:07:48 AM »

Useful learning from KentR today....my handling issue appears to be several things combined.  He gave me some good ideas, and the gist of it is:
1.  Fender needs to be kept off the tire.
2.  Taking out the front engine, and NOT adding ballast up front, lightens up the front end a lot.  This means my rake doesn't really work (making the bike very susceptible to the fender effect).
3.  That front-rear balance issue matters more with the large side area of the fairing (center of pressure is well ahead of the center of mass).  This also makes the bike less stable.

I should have seen this coming, but mistakes are my stock in trade.  Doing the big "hurry up" to get to the salt left me with a compromised ride.  I'll be moving the engine forward, and another battery and water tank as well.  I'm making more heat, per run, than expected.  I'm also taking one battery down pretty hard (those dual SPAL fans can pop a 20A fuse at switch on!)

Have a great ride and keep us posted when you can!
JimL
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #247 on: September 06, 2010, 12:57:57 PM »

Last night we got home.  The lawn sprinkler is under the truck.  The BUB staff and volunteers ran a great meet.  My youngest daughter, Gretchen, and me had an enjoyable time.  Definitely, we will be back in 2011.

The fancy lambda meter quit working and I do not know how to read the plugs when I use the racing gas.  Matt Capri was there and I asked him if the #135 main jets that he installed were right for the conditions.  He said that the big NA motors run #140 and #145 jets and the #135's should work fine in my little engine, and if they were off, they would be a little bit rich.  He said "Don't worry.  Just ride it."  He was right.  The jetting was perfect.

My usual method is to run down the middle of the track.  I did this on Tuesday morning on the down and it worked OK up till about 120mph.  Then the bike snaked around.  The front wheel was hunting when it jumped in and out of ruts and the back tire was spinning bad.  There was very little traction.  I kept the throttle on the stop until I thought I was going to crash and then I backed off a bit.  Then I pinned it again.  I went through this procedure a few times.  It was one of the best moments in my life when I got through the traps.  The down was 126+.

It was time to do my annual thinking.  Another run in that goop might be my last.  There was a side wind that morning and almost everybody avoided the downwind track edge.  The good salt would be there, I hoped.  The wind had died down.  It was my lucky day.  I ran the back on the track edge just inside of the markers.  The salt was nice and Bonnie ran straight and hard.  It was a good run.  The back was 129+.

This is the first year for the new motor and it is slightly faster than the old one was after years of fiddling and tuning.  The 130 mph barrier was not crossed.  Maybe next year.

     
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #248 on: September 07, 2010, 10:35:51 AM »

Land speed racing is in many ways the ultimate test of a builder's ability.  The adverse atmospheric and ground conditions, the remoteness of the speedways, the long distances to be traveled at full throttle- all make it very difficult.  Lars and his Indian Scout had an especially challenging time.  This is his first year on the salt and conditions are completely opposite those of his native Denmark.

Lars had his share of challenges, such as head gasket durability.  He overcame all of this and he made a successful run through the mile.  The bike is fast, it ran in the mid 80's as I recall.  This is much quicker than a standard Scout.  He has done a very good job.   


* Lars and Gasket.jpg (344 KB, 1024x683 - viewed 199 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #249 on: September 09, 2010, 12:08:33 AM »

Meeting new people is a great thing about land speed racing.  These two fellows are Dave on the left and Louie on the right.  They came down from BC in a ratty old van.  Their bike was this 400 cc Yamaha twin with the Burt Munro handlebars.  Their pit was next to ours.  Their objective was to learn everything they could about LSR.  They got six runs on the little Yamaha before it gave up and broke.  Dave did the riding and Louie was the wrench.  Louie said he will definitely be back next year with his own bike.  Nice people.

A couple of young guys thrashing an innocent little Jap twin.  Sorta like most of us a long time ago.       


* Louie and Dave.JPG (320.82 KB, 1024x683 - viewed 215 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #250 on: September 09, 2010, 07:19:13 PM »

This cute older couple owns a Vincent.  The Vincent owners are unique to motorcycling - it is their commitment to their bikes.  The motorcycles seem to return this affection with good service.  One fellow I talked to a few years ago had his Vincent in his minivan.  He put 400,000 miles on the bike over the years.  Another bloke was my age and he had his Vincent since his teens.  He modified the bike as he went through the phases of his life.  The psychedelic paint job in the 70's, etc.  Some of the bikes have names and are part of the families.  Many are not sold.  Instead, they are passed on through the generations.  These folks are very interesting to talk to if one gets the chance.   


* Vincent Couple.jpg (270.86 KB, 1024x683 - viewed 190 times.)
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« Reply #251 on: September 10, 2010, 10:30:27 PM »

That sounds like Terry Prince with the sidecar
Had his Vincent since his teens
Still has the same leathers! that still fit!
Really clever guy and a really nice guy to talk to as well

I've still got the CB1100 I bought when I was in my twenties, not quite the same thing
And my younger brother recently gave me back the jacket my gave me when I turned 17
I can't even get my arms in it
G

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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #252 on: September 11, 2010, 01:08:36 AM »

My old leathers are too small, too.  It is strange how cowhide shrinks.  The guy I talked to that had the bike forever was not Terry and he had a solo.  I wish I could remember his name.  A red Rapide will go on auction soon in Las vegas.  The auctioneer's estimates are US$80,000 to US$100,000, as I remember.  The Rapide is the basic model Vincent.  That is serious money for an old bike.

It was my first day of my rookie year.  Everything was going wrong.  Speed wobbles, etc.  I was a scared little puppy.  Golf was looking good.  That night while I sat near the campfire a racer asked me how I was doing.  I told him what was happening.  He carefully explained to me what to do so things would work.  The next day he watched me and gave me more help.  That fellow is Curtis in the photo with his Buell Blast.

Most of us like to race.  Curtis lives to ride at Bonneville.  He has some health issues and his love of the salt keeps him alive.  Every year he shows up to ride in the Run-Watcha-Brung class with his NOS powered Blast.  He goes faster every year in his quest for 100 mph.  Now he is up to 94 mph.  That is as fast as it will go this year, according to Curtis.  He hopes to make it quicker during the off-season.  Almost everyone goes faster than Curtis, but few have more fun. 


* Curtis and his Bike.JPG (279.58 KB, 1024x683 - viewed 188 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #253 on: September 12, 2010, 10:28:17 PM »

Motorcycle racers generally fall into three categories.  One bunch has lots of talent and luck.  They can do something for the first time and everything goes great.  Another group has lots of time or money and fewer skills.  They can get good results from trial and error.  The remainder do not have the funds or hours for trial and error and they are not rocket scientists.  They need professional help.

I am one of those who cannot do it alone.  When I started land speed racing it was many years since I built bikes and engines.  The internet was new and wonderful.  Computers were not around earlier.  I could order all sorts of things with a few mouse clicks.  I did this and a lot of the things I ordered worked OK.  Some very expensive things did not.  This bothered me.  This LSR is serious business and inferior parts and assembly could cost me a record, injure me, or worse.  It was time to use the old fashion method.  I needed to find a speed shop that did LSR.

The gentleman in the photo is Matt Capri, the owner of South Bay Triumph in Lomita, California.  He developed most of the engine parts that I use.  He helps me a lot, and of course, I pay him for the parts and work.  This is his business.  The motorcycle to the right is the Turbo  Bike.  It is a Bonneville just like mine that runs a blower.  Matt and the bike hold several records and the engine has about 100 hours on it of racing and dyno testing.  There are all sorts of Turbo Bike developed parts on my cycle, especially in the lower end.  As I figure, if the Matt cannot break them on the Turbo Bike, I cannot break them, either.

The folks around us in these meets are all special in their own ways and they make our experiences richer and fuller.  These people have done this for me. 





* Matt Capri with Bike.jpg (350.27 KB, 1024x683 - viewed 237 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #254 on: September 13, 2010, 10:53:52 PM »

The Bonneville is back on the road in street trim.  It is time to enjoy these last few dry days before the rains.  A nice ride in the hill country after work.  Life is good.

Modern finances allow a person to go beyond broke and this will be a Burt Munro year.  Maximum speed with minimal financial is the theme.  The streamlining will be streamlined, the intake and exhaust systems will be tuned to the cams, and the black box will be reprogrammed to give more spark advance. A new helmet, too, to meet the 2010 certifications.  That is all.  Most of this I can do myself.   


* Back on the Road.JPG (293.23 KB, 800x534 - viewed 179 times.)
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