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Author Topic: Team Go Dog, Go! Modified Partial Streamliners  (Read 518552 times)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #210 on: July 28, 2010, 12:22:51 AM »

All I caught was a little red rock crab and a starfish.  Really, all I wanted to do was be in the warm sunshine all day.  A rare treat that we get for a few months.
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #211 on: July 28, 2010, 08:25:54 PM »

This year I finished the build on the long block and it is tested and broken in.  The street induction and exhaust systems are figured out.  No more work is needed there.  Now it is time to get the racing induction and exhaust systems working.  The bike is about ten horsepower down from where it should be.  The standard carbs cannot flow enough air and correctly atomize the fuel mixture at high rpm.  This cannot be fixed.  I have enough money to get to Bonneville, barely.  The new book by Vizard gives me some ideas and I will do some low cost basic hot rod tricks.  Installing a fuel/air mixture meter is the first task.  Accurate jetting, done on the salt if needed, will help me to corral a few ponies.

Lots of high powered research goes into this task.  I go down to Performance Racing and Engineering, our local auto speed shop.  I say "What fuel/air gauge will work on that Triumph?"  The owner sez "They are using the Innovative Performance gauges."  I say "Order me one."  The owner says "What do you want to look at?"  I say "I can't see all that good, and I am looking through a dark face shield while wearing sunglasses and riding a jackhammer."  He says, "We will order you a dial gauge."  The next day I hand him some money and he gives me this box full of all sorts of wires, a gauge, and other strange stuff.  I have is G2 Gauge / LC-1 Kit P/N 3801  See www.innovativemotorsports.com  These folks are very prompt at replying to technical questions when I e-mail them.

The first task is to install the oxygen sensor bung hole.  The supplied bung hole is steel and it has M18 x 1.5 threads.  My pipes are titanium and I cannot weld steel to ti.  The Arrow pipes have bung holes for the fuel injection system oxygen sensors.  I am not using them and they have M 12 x 1.25 threads.  Innovative makes a special bung hole adapter for motorcycle pipes.  It is Part # 3801 and it has M 12 x 1.25 threads.  I install it and the M 18 x 1.5 bung plug that is supplied with the kit.  The first photo shows the standard bung hole and plug on top and the special item below.  The second picture shows the setup in place.   

   

 


* Big and Little Bungs.JPG (108.77 KB, 447x336 - viewed 194 times.)

* Bung on Pipes.JPG (70.04 KB, 448x299 - viewed 232 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #212 on: July 31, 2010, 01:01:13 AM »

My wife's family has a saying "The little bird told me to do it" or "it was the bird on my shoulder talking."  No one seems to know exactly where these little sayings came from.  Their best guess is that sometime in Teutonic history a guy was about to get into big trouble.  A little bird flew down and gave him some advice.  The things the bird said saved his butt.

This week I had a bird on each shoulder.  One bird says "You need to unlock the horsepower in that engine.  Buy the carbs.  Use the credit card."  The other bird said "Don't spend the money.  You are broke for all intents and purposes.  Go slow and be happy.  You need to grow up and be responsible."  The birds chirped away and I could not make a decision.  I do not have any common sense on motorcycle matters.  I presented both sides of the issue to my wife.  She said, "Order the things and hurry up. You need to get them on the bike and working before Bonneville."  It did not take me very long to make a decision.

The 35 mm Keihin smooth bores were what I was going to order.  South Bay Triumph said the 39 mm Keihin flat slides would work better for my intended use.  I ordered a set with the billet manifolds and I sent South Bay some info about my engine.  They will prejet the carbs, as best as they can, for running at Bonneville.  These carbs are specially made for Hinckley Bonneville.  The standard throttle cables, air box, and throttle position sensor can be used.  This is more last minute work.             
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« Reply #213 on: July 31, 2010, 09:48:14 AM »

Can I borrow your wife for a while? smiley
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #214 on: August 01, 2010, 01:02:01 AM »

I think I will keep her for awhile. 
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grumm441
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« Reply #215 on: August 01, 2010, 10:36:06 PM »

The 35 mm Keihin smooth bores were what I was going to order.  South Bay Triumph said the 39 mm Keihin flat slides would work better for my intended use.  I ordered a set with the billet manifolds and I sent South Bay some info about my engine.  They will prejet the carbs, as best as they can, for running at Bonneville.  These carbs are specially made for Hinckley Bonneville.  The standard throttle cables, air box, and throttle position sensor can be used.  This is more last minute work.             

I run the 39FCR's on my Ducati 750GT and My Guzzi 850 GT , I also used to run a single 39FCR on my Benelli Scooter and a pair on my 750 monster. Now if I have project and it needs a carby my choice is easy. Great carbs, easy to setup, and work really well.  Funny really, as I used to work fro the Australian Dellorto Importer
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #216 on: August 03, 2010, 01:22:14 AM »

It is nice to hear that these carbs work good.  I am a bit nervous about them.  They might be too big.  They are 1 -1/2 inches diameter, just like the Clubman racing Gold Star carbs, and the Goldie has a big 500cc cylinder, as compared to my little 432cc jugs.  The Gold Star is can be a high strung and difficult bike to ride. 

Copper is an easy material to work and finish.  Lots of shapes are available at the plumber's supply, such as the tubes and end caps that I used to make these two gage housings.  One is the air fuel ratio gage and the other has a LED that tells me if the system is "on."   The button on the little gage is for system calibration.  The gages are low so they will fit inside the race fairing.

Some flat sheet was needed for the brackets and small gage face.  I heated a pipe section to red hot and dropped it into a bucket full of water.  This annealed it.  Then I slit the pipe lengthwise and flattened it out into a sheet.  The handlebar clamps are Drag Specialties DS-302020 Miller's Mirror Clamp for use on 1" OD Tubing.  These clamps are handy when anything needs to be mounted on 1 inch diameter handlebars.  The brackets are attached to the cases with copper rivets from a saddle maker's supply.  Zip ties near the gages clamp the wires to the bar.  This prevents the wires from being pulled out of the gages if the wires are tugged.

The dial gage is a complex instrument.  It has a stepper motor and lots of intricate lighting components.  Bike vibration destroys a lot of gages and I did not want this one to break.  It is rubber mounted so it will last a long time.

 

 


* Back of Gages.JPG (77.51 KB, 448x308 - viewed 203 times.)

* Front of Gages.JPG (77.19 KB, 448x299 - viewed 206 times.)

* Gages on Bars.JPG (108.22 KB, 448x305 - viewed 206 times.)

* Tie Near Gage.JPG (73.73 KB, 448x299 - viewed 204 times.)
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grumm441
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« Reply #217 on: August 03, 2010, 01:51:04 AM »

It is nice to hear that these carbs work good.  I am a bit nervous about them.  They might be too big.  They are 1 -1/2 inches diameter, just like the Clubman racing Gold Star carbs, and the Goldie has a big 500cc cylinder, as compared to my little 432cc jugs.  The Gold Star is can be a high strung and difficult bike to ride. 

The Benelli was the best example.
It was 432 cc and as it is a scooter, has a centrifugal clutch. This meant that the carb had too work smoothly throughout the rev range
With a small amount of jetting it worked really well, and made a noticeable increase in HP. But it did come standard with a Bing.

I needed to make a gauge housing for my 750GT
While thinking about it , i was in a camping store, looking for a tent, and noticed a whole lot of different size and shape stainless steel cups.
I went back to the car, got the gauge,  back to the shop, tried it in a few different cups, and $5.00 later , really nice gauge housing.
The guy in the shop thought i was some kind of nut case. He was probably right
G
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« Reply #218 on: August 03, 2010, 02:02:36 AM »

The guy in the shop thought i was some kind of nut case. He was probably right
G

....hey, he sounds like a smart guy,send me his number we'd probably get along.... cheers tongue

BTW Wobbly, that Benelli went like a bullet, I borrowed it once and the Colonel said, "keep both hands on the bars, no, I'm serious....keep both hands on the bars"....A young motocross gun at work laughed at me when I turned up at work on it, I made him ride it to the end of the driveway, he stopped laughing.
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Few understand what I'm trying to do but they vastly outnumber those who understand why...................

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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #219 on: August 07, 2010, 12:07:33 AM »

So many, many things to do ... so little time!
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grumm441
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« Reply #220 on: August 08, 2010, 12:31:08 AM »

So many, many things to do ... so little time!

If it wasn't for the last minute, when would anything get done cheers
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« Reply #221 on: August 08, 2010, 10:42:26 AM »

Usually I can avoid the last minute panic.  This is a time when I do not think and reason like I should.  Lately my battery is getting low and it will not start the engine.  I got all upset and was going to do some serious electrical diagnosis.  Triumph electrical parts are very expensive and I was worried.  Then I realized the loud racing pipes are on the bike and I keep the rpm low so I do not make noise and get people mad.  I was not spinning the engine fast enough to keep the battery charged.

Decades ago, I suffered through a few electrical engineering classes.  We built an intricate circuit in the lab and it took us civil engineering guys a week of afternoons to get it to work.  The entire mess of wires, resistors, and other goodies generated different electrical currents and impulses at various output nodes.  The professor OK'ed the circuit and then he said "put this little resistor in the circuit near the ground."  We did, and all of the circuit outputs were wrong.  The prof said something like "That simulates a bad ground.  Always make sure that everything is grounded OK.  Check the grounds first when things do not work."  He had us hook up the meters to the output terminals and then he moved a cord or wire around the circuit.  The cord carried electricity from an independent source and it did not touch the circuit.  The outputs changed.  Something was happening.  I am not sure what it was.  Since then, I always read the instructions very carefully for electronic stuff and I actually do everything they say.  Some of the minor things like grounding, component location on the vehicle, and cable routing seem to be pointless and optional, but they are very important.  There are a lot of instructions with this air / fuel mixture gage and I follow them.

The components share a common ground on the engine block.  Bike engines vibrate and the little wires from the components can fatigue and break at the junction where they connect to the ground lug.  I use a gold plated ground lug and some dielectric grease between the lug, bolt, and block.  This helps to minimize corrosion and the electrical resistance that it creates.  A short piece of copper mesh cable is installed between the little wires and the lug.  This cable flexes when the engine vibrates and it does not fatigue and break as quickly as a direct connection between the lug and the little wires.

Some of these materials are hard to find.  A dab of anti-flux on each side of the wire mesh keeps the solder from being absorbed throughout the entire cable.  The anti flux I use is from Allied Manufacturing in Bozeman, Montana www.alliedmfg.co  A good electronics solder is a big help.  The stuff I use is in the picture.  The mesh cable is Radio Shack desoldering cable.  Most of these goods are stocked in a model train and airplane shop. 
 

 



* Anti-Flux.JPG (72.74 KB, 448x299 - viewed 211 times.)

* Desoldering Braid.JPG (66.92 KB, 448x299 - viewed 193 times.)

* Solder.JPG (85.12 KB, 448x299 - viewed 194 times.)

* Ground.JPG (58.44 KB, 448x299 - viewed 194 times.)
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55chevr
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« Reply #222 on: August 08, 2010, 10:45:55 AM »

I personally detest the "nick of time" struggle but seem to engage in it continuosly ...
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #223 on: August 08, 2010, 02:25:29 PM »

It is raining in the garage.  A good time to finish the gage posts.

The picture shows the ground on the bike.  A short piece of shrink tubing helps to keep the little wires from flexing where they are soldered onto the mesh.  The sensor is installed and the wires are covered with fuel line insulation where they are close to the cylinders.  This keeps them cooler.

My general philosophy on lake racer wiring is to use the minimum number of connectors, and the connectors that I do use are protected from the salt.  The wires for all components meet under the seat.  The connectors I use are little gold plated soldered on bullet jobs from Great Planes www.electrify.com.  They are very expensive.  They work good and this justifies their cost, although I would like to find more reasonably priced equivalents.  I use a small amount of dialectric grease on the connections.

The wire color coding does not match on the Innovative Motorsports components.  Green wires connect to browns, etc.  I make little tags that remind me how to connect everything together.

 


* Insulation.JPG (91.79 KB, 448x299 - viewed 202 times.)

* Ground on Bike.JPG (63.11 KB, 448x282 - viewed 205 times.)

* Connectors.JPG (106.91 KB, 448x287 - viewed 209 times.)

* Tag.JPG (119.58 KB, 410x336 - viewed 199 times.)
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #224 on: August 08, 2010, 02:44:34 PM »

The last gage post.  The wires are connected and the connectors, tags, etc are stuffed in a plastic bag.  The whole nest is put in a can.  Can choice is important.  This is a British bike so the Prince Albert can is appropriate.  Albert must be English.  Our royalty is Lady GaGa.  It is important to loosely seal the electrics so they are protected from the salt and there is enough air circulation to prevent condensation.

The gages work.  One tells me the indicated fuel-air mixture and the other shows me that the system is in operation.  All gages are prone to problems just like other systems.  I do not rely on them entirely.  I also look at the traditional mixture indicators such as the soot color on the spark plugs and muffler ends, too.   


* Connectors in Bag.JPG (95.32 KB, 448x326 - viewed 199 times.)

* Prince Albert.JPG (95.81 KB, 371x336 - viewed 187 times.)

* Gages Gauging.JPG (83.69 KB, 448x299 - viewed 214 times.)
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