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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #150 on: May 28, 2010, 11:13:50 PM »

Yea, at least I knew where the washer fell.

This year I am racing under a different sanctioning organization.  They are a bit fussy.  Riders need to take a physical exam.  Folks over 50 need a cardiovascular treadmill stress test.  They have this backwards.  Younger guys should take the test.  Older fellas and gals are not in shape for that kind of thing.

As always I prepare.  I stayed up past midnight last night and had a big lunch an hour before the test.  The nurse was in her 40's, with a trim figure and big green eyes.  Her assistant wired me up and she asked me a few questions.  I explained why I was taking the test.  She said "You like pizza and beer?"  I said "Yes, of course.  They are the staples of life.  How did you know?"  She said "All you motorcycle guys puke this up when you are in the ER (emergency room)."  I wanted to be somewhere else.  Then she said  "Most people in here are sick or have something wrong with them.  You are in reasonably good shape.  We will see what you can do."  Egad, now I know what my Triumph feels like.

The treadmill is a device like a belt sander turned upside down.  There are some handlebars in front of it to hang onto.  A person stands on the belt and walks or runs in place.  They turn it on and it is "Feets, do your stuff."  At first it is not too bad.  A walk is all I need.  Then she turns up the speed a bit.  Now I am walking real fast.  I do not run.  I try to look super cool and composed but this is starting to be tiring.  Then she tilts the blasted thing.  I am walking uphill fast.  About 30+ years ago I did this and it was no fun then.  At least I am not carrying a pack this time.  Finally I see black spots in front of my eyes, I am dizzy, and my legs start to cramp.  I say "I give up.  Turn it off."  She says "You passed, but your doctor will tell you the definite answer.  Toward the end you were a little hypertensive."  I do not know what hypertensive is and I do not want to find out.

Words of advice.  Never say you ride a motorcycle.  Say "Nurse, I just ate a big meal.  Projectile vomiting is never pleasant.  Just do the minimum possible to see that I can pass the test.  I will make sure I do not erupt, and if I do, it will not be in your direction."

   

 

   
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Seldom Seen Slim
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« Reply #151 on: May 29, 2010, 06:52:54 AM »

WW, you didn't tell the entire story -- at least not from my experience on the "stress test" treadmill.

When I've taken the tests (twice) I get to the spot "...Finally I see black spots..." and say I give up -- that's when the attending nurse suddenly sprouts horns and a forked tail and tells me "Good.  Now that we've got your heart going full-blast -- we need to have you continue at this rate for at least two minutes."  This is the point when i remind myself that at least I'm doing this foolishness in a hospital, 'cause when I suffer the heart attack that's only a few seconds away -- at least I'll be near help and maybe I won't simply die.  She eventually does relent and tell me I can get off the treadmill and onto the autopsy table (I'm sure they have an autopsy table there --saves time for the mortician) -- when I manage to stagger the two feet to said table I crash onto it and lie there panting and listening to the scary clatter of the pneumatic drill in the next room (and then I realize it's not an air hammer -- that noise is my heart!).

A week or two later comes the even-worse part of the story.  That's when the doctor reviews the results of the test and says something like "Well, this test showed what might be an issue, so I'd like to have a follow-up test done in two more months."  I don't know why he tells me that -- he knows that I'm about to use the double-bitted axe that I've carried with me into the Doc's exam room. . .
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #152 on: May 31, 2010, 01:12:58 AM »

Geez, I guess I had it easy. 

The hubub about racing tires in SCTA racing made me me curious about my bike's tires.  The back tire on the Bonnie was H rated.  This tire is certified to 130 mph sustained speed, maximum.  Hopefully I will be faster than 130 this year.  It is time for a new tire.

The old tire is a 130/80 x 17 steel belted Metzeler radial.  Front tires are available in this size with high speed ratings.  I need a rear tire and I do not want to experiment.  The Metzeler Roadtech is an excellent tire.  I have one on the front.  There are no 130/80 x 17 rear tires, but there are 150/70 x 17 ZR rated rears.  This tire has a height and circumference that is similar to the 130/80 x 17 tire.  I bought one and it is wider and it fit.  There were no clearance problems.  Now I have back and front tires certified for up to 150 mph.  Both are Roadtech Metzelers and they work well together.

Early this evening I got the Triumph running.  Rosie was watching the bike go together so she got to go on the first ride with the new engine.  We went to Borders Books.  It was raining and I could not pay much attention to the bike.   



  eThis might be dangerous .   tire

  is approved rated up to a 130 mph maximum sustained speed and I hope 


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saltwheels262
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« Reply #153 on: June 01, 2010, 08:36:10 AM »

curious as to what the tie wraps on the
spokes do.

haven't seen that before.

franey
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bub '07 - 140.293 a/pg   120" crate street mill  
bub '10 - 158.100  sweetooth gear
lta  7/11 -163.389  7/17/11; 3 run avg.-162.450
ohio -    - 185.076 w/#684      
lta 8/14  - 169.xxx. w/sw2           
'16 -- 0 runs ; 0 events -- made a 2 state change in ZIP codes

" it's not as easy as it looks. "
                            - franey  8/2007
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« Reply #154 on: June 01, 2010, 10:58:54 AM »

I've seen it done on dirt bikes, it is used to keep them from vibrating loose. cheers
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« Reply #155 on: June 01, 2010, 11:26:27 AM »

wobbly  the zr rated is good to 200mph                                    willie buchta
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #156 on: June 02, 2010, 01:16:32 AM »

Willy, that is nice to know and thanks for telling me.  This tire will never see 200 mph but I feel good knowing that it can do it.  A good quality tire.

Franey, spoke wrapping is something I always did with my dirt racing bikes.  I continue to do it on the Triumph.  Factory spokes on the rear wheels of these bikes are not the most reliable.  They are known to break and the tie wraps keep them from flopping around if they do.  These spokes are heavy duty ones from Buchanan Wheel in Azusa and they should not break, but I tie them anyhow.

We look down a two stroke's cylinder.  We see that the piston does not start to compress the mixture until it passes the port tops during its upward movement.  A similar thing happens with four strokes, to some degree.  The intake valve is open at bottom dead center and it does not close until after the piston has started to move upward.  The four stroke compression ratio that considers the timing of the intake valve closing, along with the engine's bore, stroke, and connecting rod length is the dynamic compression ratio.  I never figured out how to do this using pencil and paper.  Fortunately, now we have on-line calculators.  My favorite is at www.rbracing-rsr.com.  It also considers the effects of altitude.

The intake valve on the #813 cam closes at 49 degrees after bottom dead center (ABDC).  This figure is shown on the cam data sheet.  The intake valve closing on the original 790cc cam is not given in the cam data at the 0.050 inches lift value we use in the USA.  It is listed at 1mm lift.  It takes a bit of figuring to determine the closing.  Charts from previous posts are used and the 790cc intake valve closes at 37 degrees (ABDC) at 0.050 inches lift.

Experience with my 305 Honda Superhawk and BSA Spitfire showed me that putting a cam in an engine with a longer duration, alone, gives mixed results.  The engine runs great when the engine is "on the cam" and it is a bit dull and lifeless at the other engine speeds.  This is not good for a street engine built for top end power.  The engine will spend the majority of its life running in the doldrums below the speeds where the cam works best.

Lessons are learned.  Now I pay a lot of attention to dynamic compression ratio.  The 790cc engine had a 8.6 to 1 dynamic compression ratio at near sea level altitudes as shown in the table.  The 865 cc 9.1 to 1 cast pistons with the #813 cams would give me a lower 8.0 to 1 ratio.  Not good.  This would give me the same problems I had with the Honda and BSA.  I sent the cast pistons back and ordered the 865 cc 10.5 to 1 forged pistons.  Now I have a higher 9.2 to 1 dynamic compression ratio.  This will give me more performance than the standard motor at all engine speeds.

The affects of altitude on dynamic ratios are for another post.

   


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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #157 on: June 03, 2010, 10:58:42 PM »

Many years ago there were a number of street rodders in our neighborhood.  No one that I knew at the time had two cars.  The rod was also the daily transport.  A lot of the cars looked like the vehicles in the Venables Rods and Racing workshop.  Old Fords, Plymouths, etc.  A lot of these guys raced.  It was Sunday fun to them.  None of the cars had many wins.  These were street cars.  The Vietnam war ended this.  Most of the rodders left the 'hood.

My buddies and myself hit the streets during or a couple of years before the first Arab oil embargo.  We could not imagine that cheap or plentiful gasoline would ever happen again.  We were into bikes by necessity.  Cars and especially hot rods were not part of our lives.  One old hot rod was occasionally filled with gas and we siphoned the fuel out of it to fill our bikes.  It was the "mother ship" for us hoodlums.

The Triumph, with its 865 cc forged pistons and #813 cams, is built in the old hot rod tradition.  It is a street bike that sees some racing.  It has as many high performance parts as most race engines but it is not tuned for racing, only.  Compromises are made.  The bike has many other tasks on its list.  Next year I will put a set of 35 mm smooth bore carbs on it and I will tune the intake and exhaust.  That's about all of the engine related work for the next five years or so.

The 994 big bore engine is more of a Bonneville racing motor.  It will have about the same compression at Bonneville as my new build has in Oregon Willamette Valley.  The added displacement and compression will help make up for the power loss due to the thinner atmosphere.  Anyone building one of these Triumphs for the salt should consider the bigger engine.

This concludes the tuning part of the build.  Now, a few posts will be about putting the engine together. 
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« Reply #158 on: June 04, 2010, 03:36:43 PM »

both answers on spokes sound
good to me.

franey
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bub '07 - 140.293 a/pg   120" crate street mill  
bub '10 - 158.100  sweetooth gear
lta  7/11 -163.389  7/17/11; 3 run avg.-162.450
ohio -    - 185.076 w/#684      
lta 8/14  - 169.xxx. w/sw2           
'16 -- 0 runs ; 0 events -- made a 2 state change in ZIP codes

" it's not as easy as it looks. "
                            - franey  8/2007
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« Reply #159 on: June 04, 2010, 11:57:55 PM »

Now it is time to build the motor.  These posts, as with all others, are intended to show the basic things that every racer does.  Nothing fancy.

Manuals are an essential starting point.  The Triumph manual is a handy reference for an experienced mechanic.  It is a quick reference for most tasks.  The Haynes manual has the same information as the Triumph manual plus a lot more.  It shows a lot of procedures.  I use them both.

The Triumph manual is organized into chapters such as "Fuel and Exhaust," "Final Drive," etc.  My notebook is organized with the same sections.  All notes and other data for the parts covered in the Final Drive chapter are in my Final Drive notebook section.  This organization helps immensely.  I do not keep expenditure receipts.  Some things I would rather forget.

The critical engine parts have arrived from South Bay Triumph.  I asked them to make sure the bores were the right size for the pistons and to hone as needed, to check the rod small end to gudgeon pin clearances and to hone as needed, and to check and set the ring end gaps.  These are special racing parts and I do not have the experience to do this.

It has been a long time since I was a machinist and I have lost the feel that is needed to measure parts to tenths.  Thousandths is the best I can do.  I bring the pins, rods, pistons, and barrels to my machinist and he fills out many of the blanks on my 2010 Clearances form.  I measure the ring gaps and the crank and rod bearing clearances.  This form is vital as a reference for the future.     

 

     


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« Reply #160 on: June 05, 2010, 01:52:30 AM »

  I do not keep expenditure receipts.  Some things I would rather forget.

That's the least of your problems....As far as relationships go the kind of money that LSR gobbles up is practically a war crime, if you keep ANY evidence of cost make sure it is in a code that even you will forget, that way even if the cojones are being twisted you won't give it up evil.......besides what's the point in writing something on one side of a ledger to which there will NEVER be anything on the other rolleyes

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« Reply #161 on: June 06, 2010, 02:18:56 AM »

Yes, racing costs big money.  We need to look at the good side, we would be spending the money somewhere, like on loose wimmen, gambling, or booze.  Racing keeps us out of trouble.

The engine had a little oil leak that I fixed and I have been running it about town for the last week.  Today it stopped raining and I took it out on the open road.  I cannot run it hard now, it is in the "break-in" period.  The engine runs very strong up to about 3,000 rpm.  It goes flat and stutters, then it runs like a rocket above 4,000 rpm.  I tried a few things and eliminated carb jetting as a problem.  Jetting changes do not make it run better.   

Years ago I had this same difficulty on a couple of engines that I put cams into.  It seemed like, at a certain rpm, there was a pressure wave traveling back from the closing intake valve that was confusing the carburetor.  My cure at that time was to either learn to live with the problem or to switch to a different cam.

Does anyone have any suggestions?



 
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« Reply #162 on: June 06, 2010, 02:32:36 PM »

Yes, racing costs big money.  We need to look at the good side, we would be spending the money somewhere, like on loose wimmen, gambling, or booze.  Racing keeps us out of trouble.

The engine had a little oil leak that I fixed and I have been running it about town for the last week.  Today it stopped raining and I took it out on the open road.  I cannot run it hard now, it is in the "break-in" period.  The engine runs very strong up to about 3,000 rpm.  It goes flat and stutters, then it runs like a rocket above 4,000 rpm.  I tried a few things and eliminated carb jetting as a problem.  Jetting changes do not make it run better.   

Years ago I had this same difficulty on a couple of engines that I put cams into.  It seemed like, at a certain rpm, there was a pressure wave traveling back from the closing intake valve that was confusing the carburetor.  My cure at that time was to either learn to live with the problem or to switch to a different cam.

Does anyone have any suggestions?



 

It sounds to me like your having a problem with reversion. I believe that I suffered from the same problem last year and it prevented me from getting into top gear since my RPM dropped into the reversion zone on that upshift and it would not pull. You may remember that my bike had a very long intake between the carb and the head, and a relatively short exhaust. I'm blaming my problem on that combination. I was experimenting with the pressure waves, and I was getting positive pressure in the intake in the upper 3rd of the rpm range, and it pulled like a freight train once there, but if I can't get to that range in top gear it's not doing me any good.

For this year I'm going back to having the carb mounted at the head, and will play around with exhaust length to optimize the midrange, and hopefully get it to pull top gear and really bump my record to something a little more respectable, LOL.

You might find that the easiest way to correct your problem is by playing with the exhaust configuration. On Harleys with drag pipes I've experienced similar issues to what you describe and found that adding or modifying baffles helped. The trick as I understand it is to make the low pressure portion of the exhaust pressure waves hit the exhaust port at the same time that the cam is on overlap. This will have the effect of sucking the intake charge into the cylinder. If the high pressure wave is at the exhaust port it pushes back through the valves and doesn't let enough fresh air/fuel mixture in. A little exhaust tuning might just be the ticket for you.
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« Reply #163 on: June 06, 2010, 09:58:36 PM »

     Jim McFarland offers some thoughts on reversion in the August 2010 issue of Circle Track magazine, pages 16 & 18.

     I used to get a lot of "stand off" just outside the inlet to the carb on my BB34 BSA single back in the early 70's.  Always figured the fuel wasn't doing much good out there [holed the piston more than once], suspected the reground cams might not have been optimal for the rest of the combination, life got in the way before I ever really figured out what was happening.

                             Ed
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« Reply #164 on: June 07, 2010, 12:53:17 AM »

Thanks, Ed and Ed.  Thanks for the tips.  I read up on reversion today and that is what it is.  I remember the Gold Stars, too.  They had a problem with this.  Fortunately I have all sorts of intake and exhaust parts laying about and a couple of months before BUB.  It is time for me to get the magazine and start to figure out a solution.     
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