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Author Topic: #72 nearing completion  (Read 9950 times)
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desotoman
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« Reply #30 on: July 16, 2009, 10:28:32 AM »

For general information when I bought the Temple Roadster a few years ago it was painted Red. I asked Greg Temple why it was painted Red and not the White I remembered. He said the officials were giving him a hard time when  it was white, so he painted it Red. It had big numbers as well as exposed wheels.

Tom G.
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Asking questions is one's only way of getting answers. As a young boy I was always taught that there is no such thing as a stupid question. It suggests that the quest for knowledge includes failure, and that just because one person may know less than others they should not be afraid to ask rather than pretend they already know. In many cases multiple people may not know but are too afraid to ask the "stupid question"; the one who asks the question may in fact be doing a service to those around them.
DallasV
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« Reply #31 on: July 16, 2009, 10:56:09 AM »

I used to love to watch that car and I never had any trouble seeing it. Of course there was a lot of noise associated with the car to help track it. Whenever I would bring first timers to the salt I would always point out temples roadster when it was at the starting line and tell them this car is either going to go really fast, or round and round. Great car to watch
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Records or parts, I didn't come all this way not to break something.
jl222
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« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2009, 11:32:46 AM »

Great looking lakester, one question though.  I thought that the officials frowned upon white vehicles on the salt, are you going to add a little color to it before bonneville? cheers

  This problem goes back to November 19 1937. Quoting out of THE LAND SPEED RECORD book ''During a series of trials with the THUNDERBOLT the new 'electric eye' recording apparatus failed to register the car as it flashed through the mile. Calmly, Captain Easton suggested that the combination of the blazing sun, the silver fusalage of the aluminum car, and the blinding whiteness of the salt were to blame.
 Less than a year later, Captain Easton returned to Bonneville, sporting a matt black arrow painted each side of the 7-ton car to overcome the problem of visual recording.''

  He did set a record that year of 312.00 mph and 345.50 the next year August 27 1938.

     JL222 cheers

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Rex Schimmer
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« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2009, 11:53:49 AM »

Harv,
So great to see your car completed, all of the work to get the endless list of details done so that it is ready and doing most of it (all?) by yourself is very admirable. Can't wait to see you at the salt.

Rex
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Rex

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Glen
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« Reply #34 on: July 16, 2009, 12:06:33 PM »

Over the years SCTA has spent a lot of money on photo cells/sensors to assure we don't miss any times. The final answers to the now used cells are made by Banner. The last two years we never missed a time on any vehicle except the ones that ran over the cells or spun across the wires.

As I stated earlier we are about 1000 feet from the course and the small, bikes, cars and streamliners are  a problem to see until they start the first timer at the 2-1/4 mile. We are at the 3 mile and to see a small vehicle that is light in color adds to the problem even for the crews trying to find it.

Once they enter into the middle (4th) mile it is up to the stewards to keep us updated on all courses. Keeping up with the 3 courses requires some very dedicated volunteers to be on top on everything going on.
If you sat in my seat for as many years as I have you would understand why we ask for certain things in the rule book including a good mobile CB that has an out side antenna and we can talk to the crews in the push vehicles and keep everyone on the lake bed (salt flats ) as to whats going on.
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Glen
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« Reply #35 on: July 16, 2009, 07:59:19 PM »

Glen,

If you have trouble seeing my car let me know. I'll bring some rattle cans to remedy that. I just thought it wouldn't be much fun to sit in a completely enclosed dark car getting ready to run. Maybe next year I'll have a air conditioner to keep this old boy cool. Hope to see you at salt talks.

Harv
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hitz
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« Reply #36 on: August 22, 2009, 09:50:42 AM »

Well Speedweek 2009 is history.
We've lost a racer that was from my little town and was no doubt the most important thing that happened at this Speedweek. I didn't know Barry personally
but had gone to his dad Tom Bryant for advice before I started to build the lakester. God speed, Barry.

We made it to the salt flats on  Aug 6th and lined up for inspection in a heavy wind. We made it to the new car inspection slot and were told not to pull any panels. Then they asked us to take the car back to our pit. They were afraid the canopy was going to fly and beat the cars up. I didn't argue. They promised me I would be allowed to go to the front of the line the next day. They made that promise good.

Michael Stewart and Doug Macmillan were my inspectors and Bill (one of the starters) helped me with the restraints and clausaphobic tendencies. Should have built a roadster. The car passed as is with a few recommendations in the log book. I hung out in the inspection area all one day in 2006 and am still amazed at geniality and helpfulness of the inspectors.

I arrived at the salt with a fever and some kind of flu but antibotics were doing their job and the fever left. Not too perky but determined to take that first ride. The rookie pass was done slowly (in the 70's) and the pilot chute couldn't pull the main chute out because of the slow speed. The course worker asked me if I had pulled the chute. I told him I had. When I got out I saw the pilot chute on the ground by itself.  Didn't feel to cool about that but the starter signed it off and said I had done everything that was required.

The car was running lean and I enrichened it up with the laptop. It continued to run lean through the next 6 runs although it helped the air/fuel ratio each time I enrichened it. It was too little too late. I killed the little Saturn on the 7th run. I got to 144.8 but just could not get that last 6 mph. for a license upgrade.

The car ran true although 200 mph speeds would have been a much better test.


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hitz
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« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2009, 10:52:52 AM »

that was a breakfast call.
Although the first run for the car could have gone a lot better, I still feel that it was a success and pointed out a lot of need for improvement. After the fact it's easy to see some things like going to full rich and leaning out a little at a time! Shifting was difficult and needs major improvement. Some controls in the cockpit need to be repositioned. The new G-Force arm restraints when fully shortened should be a inch shorter. The heavy rings and snaps flop around when exiting the cockpit chipping paint, banging on instruments and looking for something to hang up on. However they have the proper SFI rating and date. Go figure!

All in all, it was a fun experience and driving the car was a lot more enjoyable than I imagined! See you next year.

Harvey
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4-barrel Mike
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« Reply #38 on: August 22, 2009, 10:56:20 AM »

Harvey:

  You are an inspiration to all of us young guys  afro who have yet to turn a wheel on the salt.  cheers

Mike
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Mike Kelly - PROUD owner of the V4F that powered the #1931 VGC to a 82.803 mph record in 2008!
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« Reply #39 on: August 22, 2009, 11:20:16 AM »

Congratulations Harvey---new cars can be slow to reveal their wants and needs---might we see you at EL M first!!!!!!!!  It still amazes me that we are able to get these things down the track---we canged ECUs this year and had NOISE issues---go figure!!!!!!!!!! RPM limited to 7000 instead of 8000!!!!!!!! 

I sure understand why so many like Mags, tachs, oil and water guages ONLY!!!!!!!
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Miss LIBERTY,  changing TKI  to noise, dust and RUST!!!

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« Reply #40 on: August 22, 2009, 11:36:26 AM »

Building a new car or bike and taking it to the track the first time begins stage two of the vihicle. The inspection is step one, setting in line for the first check out run can make a long day. Getting fired up and being pushed off you try to remember everything you were told is a whirlwind inside your head. Going through the timing lights and remembering which way to turn out and getting to the return road is just another step. Waiting for the crew and the words and speed takes forever.

The rest of the day hs much conversation, note taking and checking out the vehicle. It will be hard to sleep that night and the night seems to last for many more hours. The next morning you repeat the process and are allowed to increase your speed for the next license upgrade.

On the way home the conservation goes on for many hours. You get home usually very tired and face all of the clean up, checking out everything and make a lot of changes they put in the log book. Oh, don't put it off it's 11 months to the next speed week. Oh ! congrats on the first time down the long black line.
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Glen
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Bville701
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« Reply #41 on: August 22, 2009, 11:58:00 AM »

I agree with Glen.

Building a new car is NOT easy, and getting the car to the salt and making your first pass is AMAZING! Last year was our first experience with a brand new car that we had built, and we also wanted to try and get in the 200 MPH range. Well, as you know that is a very difficult thing to do. With a new car there are so many things that need to be checked after each run. This makes it difficult to just "throw the car back in line" for another pass. You should be proud that you built something and made a run with it at the salt! That is an accomplishment in itself! It might take awhile to work out all the bugs on a new car, (I know that we are still working on some) but you will get to where you want to be.

Congratulations on making your first pass down the salt with something that YOU built!     cheers
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Ryan LeFevers

701 C/GMR - 216.509 MPH El Mirage Record Holder

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« Reply #42 on: August 22, 2009, 12:10:33 PM »

Harvey;

Congratulations on your first run in your new car. Your description of it has me psyched up to get back to work on my car!

Regards, Neil  Tucson, Az
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Regards, Neil  Tucson, AZ
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