Landracing Forum Home
November 22, 2017, 01:14:55 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
BACK TO LANDRACING.COM HOMEPAGE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  


(Note: Donations are not tax deductible)







Live Audio Streaming and Archives of Past Events
Next Live Event: TBD
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Australian Streamliner  (Read 10771 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Lynchy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Brisbane - Australia
Posts: 124




Ignore
« on: September 12, 2008, 12:55:49 AM »

I thought I’d start a Landracing.com Bonneville build page for an Australian streamliner that I now help out on. The streamliner is owned by Trevor Slaughter and will compete in the F/BFS class. I’ve included it in the Bonneville build pages as there is every chance that it will eventually compete over there.

Trevor kicked off his build about 4 years ago after starting to design the car about 20 years ago. He recently decided to get the build in high gear and so advertised on the DLRA site for some help. So, we now have a “Build Night” every Tuesday evening where six of us get together to make brackets for stuff and work to assemble and disassemble the car as many times as possible.
 
So, the car. The streamliner is a very nice piece of work and will compete in the F/BFS class. F=under 3 litre BFS=BlownFuelStreamliner. The engine is a Toyota 2JZ with a largish turbo. The gearbox will be (it’s still in the delivery stage) a B&J 5 speed with pneumatic clutch engagement and CO2 shifting, the diff is a Winters quickchange.



This is how it looks. In fact this was a month or so ago and we've been madly fabricating mounts / brackets / firewalls etc since that time. You can see the twin parachute tubes at the rear under the push bar and the hole above the push bar is where the 5" exhaust will exit. The exhaust is a straight line from the outlet of the turbo. The canopy is up in this picture and is also pneumatically opened and closed. This can be done by the driver or by the crew outside the car. If the car crashes the air tank can be purged and the canopy pulled open.



This is the rear end. It has brakes fitted and these will only be used below 100mph with primary braking via the parachutes. The brakes will be activated by a hand lever in the cockpit and will be locked out above 100mph to prevent accidental activation. Another safety feature is the disengagement of the clutch if the driver lifts off the accelerator at speed. This is to prevent the rears potentially locking up. There is rear suspension activated by the pivot, there will be about an inch of travel front and rear.

Here’s the front:



The front is a beam axle held in place by a four link and twin shocks with remote reservoirs and adjusters. The rear shocks are the same. The Castor and King Pin angle are locked in and the rack is bolted to the axle.

Here’s a view of the exhaust:



Here you can see the twin Waste gates and the 5 inch exhaust pipe. Below the visible w’gate is the radiator for the engine. Up front there are 2 aluminium tubes that hold coolant and feed into an electric pump. The pump then pushes the coolant through the motor and radiator. Air will feed the radiator via a NACA duct near it in the bodywork. The other side of the car has an intercooler which will also be fed via a NACA duct.

Here’s the intake:



The cockpit looks like this:



We cut the top off a Kirke alloy seat so that the belts would go neatly over the Hans device and a headrest will be added later. The harness is a 7 point and it is a snug but comfortable fit for Trevor. The cockpit will be lined with ally sheet and covered with flameproof “carpet”. The pods on either side will hold some controls and equipment that do not need to be touched by the driver as they will not be accessible once the canopy goes down. The big yellow bottle is an air supply for the driver. The barely visible grey bottle is the CO2 for the shifter. The lever on the left is the brakes.



Here’s a photo with the exhaust in and the fin underway.



This is the maintenance panel which has the air purge(emergency dump), battery disconnect, air inlet, canopy up/down control and a few more ports for battery charger and engine oil preheater. In the background you can see the air tank and some of the canopy pneumatics.

I’ll update the build as we go. I’m also doing a build page on the DLRA site and Trevor has a website showing a rendering of the finished car at www.slaughtermotorsport.com

Thanks
Lynchy
Logged
Rex Schimmer
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 74
Location: Fulton, CA
Posts: 2121


Only time and money prevent completion!




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2008, 12:41:40 PM »

Lynchy,
Neat car! and thanks for starting the build diary please keep it going. It appears that you are planning to use an air to air style intercooler, any thought about using water to air? Probably gets the inlet charge to a lower temp and it eliminates the drag of the air going thru the intercooler. Just a thought.Keep the updates coming!

Rex
Logged

Rex

Not much matters and the rest doesn't matter at all.
Dave Cox
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Stanton CA
Posts: 144



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2008, 12:59:10 PM »

Looks good so far. You may want to reconsider locking out the braking system over 100 MPH. The brakes are VERY useful in controlling wheelspin, and if the chutes fail (and they do, just ask me), you'll want something to pull on while you're screaming....

Dave
Logged

SPARKY
Global Moderator
Hero Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 75
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 6260




« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2008, 01:20:02 PM »

I put a big foot pedal on mine this year---brought it down from 210 in 1.5 miles on test this year without chute- shocked--sure would not like to have to from 300---- LOL my leg almost had a cramp as it was!!!!!!!! :-Dlol
Logged

Miss LIBERTY,  changing TKI  to noise, dust and RUST!!!

The # 1 issue is: TO KEEP THE REPUBLIC      
   Center for Self Governance            tncsg.org     mrspowell.org

"Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing."   Helen Keller
NArias3
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 55
Location: Westlake Village, CA
Posts: 138



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2008, 06:43:23 PM »

Lynchy-
Finally, someone's building a landspeed car around the 2JZGTE.  This engine is a sleeper and is happiest when attached to a "largish" turbo, as you stated.  Expect big speeds from this thing.

Nick 3rd.
Logged

Enthusiasm is the Force that Creates Momentum.

SCTA Gear Grinder.

Webste: www.atomicspeedware.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Atomic-Speedware/205361742830953
Peter Jack
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 74
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3444





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2008, 01:35:18 AM »

Snug but comfortable is not the way safety harness should be used. Someone outside the car with lots of leverage should be pulling those things down as tight as he possibly can. In the event of a crash they stretch an amazing amount and the tighter the driver's held in the less damage happens to his body.

Pete
Logged
Aussi Trev
New folks

Offline Offline

Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 7


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2008, 06:19:28 AM »

To those who have made comments.  First let me say thank you to the positive comments. 
The seat belts, "snug but comfortable" that is a relative statement.  I have just sold my dragster to focus on the building of this car and I can assure you that, tight the seat belts will be and comfortable they won't be. Thank you for your advise I appreciate it.
The 2JZ is a wonderful engine and hopefully it will produce what is needed. I'm sure IT will.
Brakes.  My concern is again based from my dragster experience.  The natual instinct for wheel spin etc was to gab the brake lever and pull as hard as I could.  I would hate to have some thing go " not to script" where my instict would tell me to grab the brake where it may well be the worst thing to do.  I always think of pulling on the hand brake on a gravel road. The result is that the car will spin.  Not nice in a streamliner.

Thank you every body for your comments, I will listen and consider them.
Logged
Lynchy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Brisbane - Australia
Posts: 124




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2008, 09:03:28 PM »

"Snug but comfortable" is a relative term, as the straps will be so tight that if he can breathe he will be comfortable. I help out as a starter at the DLRA speed week and one of the tasks is the final tightening and check of driver's harnesses. I always manage to drag them down tighter than is enjoyable.

Aussi Trev is our "boss" and owner of the car (owner/builder/driver/etc) and he can answer all the technical questions. I'll post up more photos as things go together.

Lynchy
Logged
Lynchy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Brisbane - Australia
Posts: 124




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2008, 01:29:06 AM »

Build Night Update for 16/9/08

Still lots going on and a few (poor quality) photos to enjoy. I kicked off last night by putting together a box that houses a step down transformer and a battery charger. The box was an old UPS battery box I had lying around. I put a handle on top and mounted the other bits inside. This just tidies up these bits for when we are in the pits and transporting the car up to the line. The step down tranny converts 240v to 110v and is used to power the engine oil warmer and the battery charger is to keep the batteries charged up. In the pits the box will be connected as necessary and will sit on the trailer plugged up to a generator when we take the car up to the startline.

Phil welded up the steering uni’s and connectors. The photo make the shaft look askew but I’m sure it was just the angle of the photo. Phil also welded up the ally in the canopy, the parachute levers, the seat belt brackets and seat brace and a bunch of other things.



Later on I made up a brace to sit behind the seat as a support and cut down the top of the seat as it would have rubbed on the belts. I think I had it in and out about 10 times – I’m still not finished either! The brace had to be put a bit higher than planned due to the brake booster. You can just see it on the left side of the seat.





The photo above shows the steering column as it is now mounted and the stick holding up the canopy + Dave’s backside! Trevor tells us that the canopy may go off this week to be skinned. Hope so!

Another photo towards the rear:



With Phil deep in thought about how the intercooler is going to sit. Yes the foxtail is back in position…..



Dave was busy making up blanking plates for the parachute launch tubes as well as creating a new dash for inside the car. He also did a bit more work on the switch panel for the driver. The dash inside will just have indicator lights showing what gear the car is in, a shift light and a “trouble” light. There will be no gauges for Trevor to read as he feels that they will be hard to read and a distraction. Any time the Trouble light goes on he will need to shutdown. It is used to indicate any problem anywhere in the car.

Here’s the intercooler:



Phil was working out the ends and fittings needed as well as how it would best sit in the car. As mentioned earlier NACA ducts will feed air to it from the side of the car.

Richard the 2nd was busy making up the shock absorber link mounts for the diff. Difficult job due to the placement of bolts on the diff and slight irregularities with the casting from side to side.

I’m off for the next two weeks. Trevor has granted me leave to go on holidays even though I’m going to Sydney to do some work on another car belonging to a friend of mine, Big Gaz. So I may not have any updates unless Trev sends me some photos or the other guys post some notes. I might do an update on the Jag though. I started a build page for this one ages ago but never found the time to keep it up to date. I might get it going again.

Don’t forget - www.slaughtermotorsport.com.au
Logged
Aussi Trev
New folks

Offline Offline

Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 7


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2008, 10:48:03 PM »

For your interest, the new front page for the team web site is now up and can be seen at www.slaughtermotorsport.com 
More to come as we fully develop the pages.
Please enjoy and thank you all for the interest in our car.
Trev.
Logged
Jambo
New folks

Offline Offline

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2008, 05:27:12 AM »

Hi All,

My name is Ray Box.  I'm part of the Slaughter Motorsport Team and I look after the PR, Marketing and website within the team.  From now on all the news and build updated can be found on our News & Build Diary page of the Team website http://www.slaughtermotorsport.com/builddiary.html

We plan to have weekly updates but this will depend on the progress of the build.  Very soon you'll be able to join our email E-News list and we'll keep you update on all the latest with the build etc.  Until then please check back to the site on a regular basis for all the latest.

We'd also enjoy any feedback on the build and if you have any questions please drop us an email. 

Regards,
Ray Box
Slaughter Motorsport
Logged
mtkawboy
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Location: Billings Mt
Posts: 459




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2008, 12:07:22 PM »

Very nice build web site, keep it coming !
Logged
1212FBGS
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Age: 57
Location: Vista, Ca
Posts: 2532


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2008, 02:14:02 PM »

i like the air rams to open and close the canopy
kent
Logged
guttley782
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Age: 59
Location: York, United Kingdom
Posts: 209



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2008, 01:05:36 PM »

I think the quality of the build is superb. You guys should be proud of what you are doing. I wish you all the best in you project. I would love to come to Lake Gairdner but it is a long expensive trip for me!
Logged

An eccentric Englishman building a motorcycle streamliner with the help of a few friends!
Lynchy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Brisbane - Australia
Posts: 124




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2008, 01:24:57 AM »

Kent - the air rams are a great thing to play with. We've set up 2 switches for them. The driver has a switch and the access panel outside the car has one. The canopy will only close if both are in the down position and will open if either is put in the up position. If we lose air pressure you just push the canopy open.

Gabe - It's a long and expensive trip for us as well. Though not as expensive as those from the US who've so far come over. From my point of view, I love our build nights and I thank Trevor for the opportunity to work on his car. Trevor recruited some of us by posting a "crew wanted" ad on the DLRA webpage. I was lucky enough to get on board.

Here's a photo from last tuesday night:



I won't be posting any more blow by blow updates here as the website now has that data and there is more scope to put additional photo's up there, but work on the car is progressing and we hope to have it complete by Christmas and on the salt at Lake Gairdner in March 09. I took the picture above because I stuck the wheels on it and it looked too good to pass up the photo. We'd done some work on the rear end to make it easier to change tyres and had to check out how it worked. I then thought why not put the fronts on?

I might do a Freud and post the odd photo now and again so you can see where we are at.

Lynchy
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page November 16, 2017, 03:06:45 PM