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Author Topic: My LS Bike Build Part 2  (Read 35757 times)
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isiahstites
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« on: February 02, 2008, 06:58:05 PM »

Well the new racing season will be starting in four months and I have been planning all winter what will be on the agenda this year for the bike.

Currently I have the bike down at a friends shop on a building table for motorcycles as I am with his guidance going to be cutting the existing neck off and stretching the frame and lower the neck. I am hoping this will allow me to be a little more stretched out on the bike and reduce frontal area.

With the new backbone and neck in place the Yamaha tank will more than likely not be on the bike this year as I will be using the space in front of the motor for a hand made gas tank. This will allow me to get lower in the bike. I will add a fuel pump and a regulator to get the fuel to the carb which will be getting a S&S style air cleaner and doing away with the stack.

With the new changes to the frame I will have to make new fork stops. With the rule change this year I will have to check travel to either side.

After all of the frame work is done I will be building another set of custom pipes for the bike which should make more power on the top end. We are hoping to go over the 130 horse mark this year with the new pipes.

Once the exhaust is done I will be hoping to add a data logging system to the bike.

And last but not least I plan on adding a set of full fairing to the bike so I can try and achieve my goal of 175 mph. I have a great color scheme planned for the bike that will hopefully be worth 1-2 mph! j/k

Pictures to follow after next weekend.

Scott

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sheribuchta
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2008, 08:28:24 PM »

scott  i know that there is a arguement about rake and trail on this site but do yourself a favor and add some  you wont be sorry  and double check swing arm and rear wheel bearings and check for a broken frame  you will be glad later  thanks  willie buchta
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isiahstites
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2008, 01:39:48 AM »

scott  i know that there is a arguement about rake and trail on this site but do yourself a favor and add some  you wont be sorry  and double check swing arm and rear wheel bearings and check for a broken frame  you will be glad later  thanks  willie buchta

Thanks Willie,

                      We have talked about kicking it out to 40 degrees. We will see how everything lines up and go from there. Did you have any problems with the swingarm and bearings this year?

Scott
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isiahstites
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2008, 02:26:09 PM »

I forgot to mention in my first post the bike weighed in at 410 lbs with a full tank of gas........not bad for a HD bike. I will also be adding some stablizing support to the rear of the bike to prevent frame flex.

Scott
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sheribuchta
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2008, 03:44:53 PM »

not this year as i run a ridged frame but i have in the past had problems with swingarm flex very scary --i like lots of rake it slowes down the steering and helps me to not overcorrect --if you use a sportbike frontend (buell) you should be good with 34 degrees of rake any other harley i would add 2 more degrees --different frontends with the same amount of rake can have different amounts of trail--depending on the steering stem and forktube offset and the axel forktube offset and some other things that you wont encounter with production tripple trees --my bike has over 50 degrees of rake -i built the bike in a biker build off with pretty much used parts i had lying around  to show that a record bike could be built for a reasonible amount (under 3000 dollars) and set a record  --the bike set 6 records this year -me i was just along for the ride  --i like to keep it simple (less things to fail) do it cheep (s.s. doesnt pay that much) have fun  oh yea and have fun and dont forget to HAVE  FUN    just some thoughts see you all at el mirage     willie buchta
« Last Edit: February 03, 2008, 03:46:38 PM by sheribuchta » Logged
isiahstites
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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2008, 09:01:01 PM »

Thursday after work I spent about an hour and half stripping the bike to what you see in the pictures below. I removed everything so the bike could bolted down to build table. I took pictures from all angles so you could see what the current neck looks like and what the new one will look like once it's finished.



















Here is what's left after cutting most of the back bone, neck and down tubes off.


Here is a pic of the neck jig that I started to set-up. I didn't get much farther than this as I could not find the right set of centering cones. I will get back to the set-up Monday. I will determine the desired stretch of the back bone and move the chassis forward to neck jig at that measurement and then center the chassis on the table and bolt it down in place and then I will center the neck jig and bolt it in place. This will allow me to start mocking up the back bone and down tubes to the new neck position.


This a shot of the back bone after being cut. I was shocked to find out that the 1 1/2" tubing had a 1/4" wall thickness. I found a piece of tubing the same o.d. and i.d as the existing back bone I just have not figured out how I am going to bend tubing that thick.


I will be back to work Monday making the slugs for all of the new tubing to mate with the old tubing via a rosette weld.

Scott
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sheribuchta
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2008, 09:20:59 PM »

good plan  sleeves rosette welds  thats the ticket  willie buchta
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isiahstites
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2008, 11:46:06 PM »

After I got off work today I went down to the shop and machined down these slugs which were orginally 1" o.d. and I needed .750 o.d. to fit the inside of the downtubes. I am not much of a machinist, but they will work.



Here they are in the downtubes, I started to drill the holes to weld them in place but it was time to go as the guys at the shop had worked a full day so I will be back at it Wednsday to make the slug for the backbone and to bend the tube for the backbone.







Scott
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« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2008, 12:10:33 AM »

Clean, intelligent, workwanship and it's apparent you're not advertising your business.- or beating your chest about how smart you are about what any dummy should know is simply good engineering.

Keep up the good work!
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5 mph in pit area (clothed)
isiahstites
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« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2008, 01:37:28 AM »

Clean, intelligent, workwanship and it's apparent you're not advertising your business.- or beating your chest about how smart you are about what any dummy should know is simply good engineering.

Keep up the good work!

Thank you for the comment it is appreciated! Althought I have had help in the way of advice on approaching certain things so I can not take all of the credit.

Scott
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RayKimbro
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« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2008, 09:15:24 AM »

I truly enjoyed watching your build diary progress - it's hard enough to just get the blessed thing DONE, much less be concerned w/sharing your trials & tribulations w/a bunch of other racers.  Thanks for taking the time to share your reflections with us.
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Don't BS on the track - that's what the internet is for.
isiahstites
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« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2008, 09:48:06 PM »

I truly enjoyed watching your build diary progress - it's hard enough to just get the blessed thing DONE, much less be concerned w/sharing your trials & tribulations w/a bunch of other racers.  Thanks for taking the time to share your reflections with us.

No problem Ray! I do it because I enjoy the interaction with the other racers and there are lots of experienced people on here who could help me if I go the wrong direction.

Scott
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isiahstites
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« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2008, 10:35:56 PM »

I got the slug for the back bone turned down.



I got the holes drilled to weld the slug in place.


I got the new back bone bent and in place. I had to use a 16 ton press to bend it, the 1/4' wall is a complete pain in the Acura.


I am off Monday so I plan on heading to the shop for part of the day to complete some more. It has been kind of frustating working an hour here and an hour there, but it's getting done slowly but surely.

Scott
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isiahstites
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« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2008, 02:14:33 AM »

I got the back bone cut to fit the neck. I decided on 38 degrees of rake as the trail was better at 38 than at 40. I stretched the frame 4 inches and it is about 4 or 5 inches lower.







Here I have the bike centered and locked down to the table. I set up the laser to create a plane so the center of the neck, back bone and rear axle could all be found a centered.







Look in front of the brush handle at the end of the table you can see the laser on the table and on top of the center line of the table.




Here are all of the pieces cut, drilled, bent, massaged, tweaked, fish mouthed and a bunch of other things that took me forever to complete. Oh, it's almost time to weld!



Everything is tacked in place and ready for final welding.



Here is my friend Dusty TIG welding the frame. I decided to have him TIG weld it rather than me MIG weld the frame. He is a much better welder than I am so it will be piece of mine when I am speeding down the track!




Here is the frame back at my house all welded up and ready for some more  modifications.




I will be adding some gussets to strengthen the neck as well as a motor mount and steering stops.

Scott
« Last Edit: February 23, 2008, 02:21:52 AM by isiahstites » Logged
1212FBGS
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« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2008, 02:34:29 AM »

i thought dusty was gonna weld your junk tomorrow.... did he get my stuff done today...
k
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