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Author Topic: Marlo Treit's Liner  (Read 156479 times)
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jacksoni
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« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2007, 04:27:11 PM »

Reminds me a lot of the Barnyard Bomber!   
If you are referring to Jim Knapp's car, I  built it and I guarantee other than being called a liner, it bears no resemblence to Marlo's!
Yah, I know you were being only a little sarcastic. shocked  rolleyes
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Jack Iliff
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« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2007, 04:31:32 PM »

Yeah -- but success ain't always pretty!
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« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2007, 04:34:25 PM »

Yeah -- but success ain't always pretty!
Thanks, I did ok with it and am pleased that Jim has too.
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Jack Iliff
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Freud
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« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2007, 06:17:33 PM »

I will complete this section with 4 more posts and then I'll go to a different phase of the car.

The release system for the body panels makes it possible for two people to have the entire body off in several minutes. In a record attempt the time requirements will not allow dzus fastener's. As I remember there are 4 dzus buttons in the cockpit but they in no way are involved with the removal of body panels. The entire skin is more like the structure of an airplane than any car. Before the structures were riveted together all of the inside panels have been painted and made as moisture resistant as possible.

14.   The aluminum lever with the black end is the release lever for the cowl.
16.   Left side of the cowl release rod with 2 hooks and the roller attachments showing.
17.   Left side pivot point for the cowl release shaft and directly below it, the arm that's activated by the previously shown release lever in the cockpit. (14)
18.     The front end of the cowl shows the actuating shaft that passes thru the entire length of the cowl panel to release the hold down hooks.


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* 17bd copy*.jpg (125.59 KB, 800x532 - viewed 589 times.)

* 18bd copy.jpg (68.45 KB, 800x532 - viewed 628 times.)
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« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2007, 06:38:29 PM »

Knapp's car ain't that bad-especially when you look at CdA-there is way more to going fast than workmanship, but HARD work is guaranteed!-Oh yeah, ain't that NUMBER ONE on his vehicle?

Jim Hume's efforts on Treit's machine are beyond belief-he is one of , if not, the best and doing it basically as a WW II level technology project executed to the highest degree of finish and quality may be one of the last of those projects what with today's composite world. I hope Hume has some more in him. Awesome project!
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5 mph in pit area (clothed)
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« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2007, 08:02:17 PM »

There are other fotos posted in Treit's website. The fotos that are there
will not be posted in the Build Diary.

http://target550.com/

FREUD




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« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2007, 12:00:28 PM »

Freud,
   
Thanks for posting those pictures. I appreciate it.

Tom G.
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Asking questions is one's only way of getting answers. As a young boy I was always taught that there is no such thing as a stupid question. It suggests that the quest for knowledge includes failure, and that just because one person may know less than others they should not be afraid to ask rather than pretend they already know. In many cases multiple people may not know but are too afraid to ask the "stupid question"; the one who asks the question may in fact be doing a service to those around them.
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« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2007, 03:04:33 PM »

Tom, if there is a section that is in question for you, post this weekend and I'll do
fotos of that area Monday when Marlo and I go up there.
Hume lives about 50 miles north of me. Marlo drives up here, it's about 235 miles
from his hanger to my place, and then I drive up and back to Humes. It saves
Marlo 100 miles out of a day that approaches 600 miles plus visitation, consultation and
2 meals. When I was a runner I had a lot of time to think about things. Marlo uses
the drive up for questions and suggestions and the drive back to digest the answers. It has been
one huge project.

The foto includes Hume and Rick Vesco. Meeting of 2 great minds.
Rick and Lance Morris were there in Oct of 2006.
Have you ever seen an idiot that wasn't smiling?


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« Last Edit: August 03, 2007, 03:14:18 PM by Freud » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2007, 05:33:52 PM »

Wow, talk about a small world the other day I was at a friends house at a party in Aurora (a little sod farm at the end of the Aurora airport) and this lady at the party asked about the "Jonny Hotnuts Bonneville Racing" sticker on the back of my truck and she mentioned that there was a friend of hers that was building a car to break 550 mph in a hanger close by (but she did not know any real details about it).

I politely nodded and wished her friend "good luck in his quest" but was really thinking that she was not really sure what she was talking about (she was definitely not crazy, in fact she was very nice but I figured she was told or misheard what she was talking about) ....after all, that would be breaking the record by over 100mph and did not think that it was possible especially from a little farm community in the sticks.

I see now that she was not as misinformed as I thought she was.....funny thing is that I met Bob Durry the very next day at Grainger.

who woulda thought.

-JH


One more thing:
550 mph?....really?.....
I looks like Im going to need get a bigger motor for my Fiat!!!!!

(seriously, good luck)






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"Sometimes it is impossible to deal with her, but most of the time she is very sweet, and if you caress her properly she will sing beautifully."
*Andres Segovia
(when Im not working on the car, I am ususally playing classical guitar)
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« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2007, 10:39:46 AM »

22. This handle actuates the lock and release mechanism for the cowl panel. It is in the release position. The driver reaches this even while strapped in.
23. The lever is in lock position.
24. The white part is plastic with a ramp that has a protrusion on it. The lever locks against that ramp. The ramp is not evident in the foto.
25. The cowl, front end is at the top, and one of the radiused panels that forms the side. 

A later set of fotos will show the air brake for high speed stopping. It will be attached to the rear bar of the roll cage. The small tube going back from the cage is to support the rear body panels during mock up. Several later fotos will show their use.


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« Last Edit: August 04, 2007, 10:50:14 AM by Freud » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2007, 11:04:23 AM »

 Hume places the cowl support in place to demonstrate the upper support and the side panel.

 The cowl and cleco secured side panel in place.

 The formed panel for the top of the cowl is in place with only 3 clecos. It's now apparent where the long panel with the short radius  fills in.

Securing the long panel.

NOTE: The last 2 fotos are switched. It's obvious when you look at the fotos and read the captions.



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* BD33.jpg (88.09 KB, 800x532 - viewed 532 times.)
« Last Edit: August 04, 2007, 11:11:45 AM by Freud » Logged

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« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2007, 11:10:46 AM »

Tom, if there is a section that is in question for you, post this weekend and I'll do
fotos of that area Monday when Marlo and I go up there.

Freud,

Thanks for the offer. I cannot think of anything at this point in time. As soon as Marlo bring her home I hope to go up and visit him and check everything out first hand. Keep up the good work your pictures speak volumes. I appreciate the thread and know a lot of other people do also.

Thanks,
Tom G.

PS. On Monday tell Marlo I said Hi, and hope to see him at Bonneville.
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Asking questions is one's only way of getting answers. As a young boy I was always taught that there is no such thing as a stupid question. It suggests that the quest for knowledge includes failure, and that just because one person may know less than others they should not be afraid to ask rather than pretend they already know. In many cases multiple people may not know but are too afraid to ask the "stupid question"; the one who asks the question may in fact be doing a service to those around them.
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« Reply #27 on: August 04, 2007, 12:21:19 PM »

 Marlo Treit, owner, looks where his money has been converted from green paper to tubing.

The wooden buck is still required to make certain that the skin is in exactly the same shape, when attached and secured, as it was originally designed.

The black pen line on the cowl is where the canopy shape will start.

The air brake, designed and machined by Les Davenport, is shown in the deployed shape.
The blurred person in the background is ATTICUS ROBERTSON,V. He is Humes grandson and is the only employee. More flattering fotos will occur in this diary as he acquires additional duties.


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« Last Edit: August 04, 2007, 12:38:10 PM by Freud » Logged

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« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2007, 12:27:11 PM »

 This is the retracted shape. It's attachment point was discussed in frame 26.
  (I quit using frame numbers. It added an extra step as I converted the files.)

Hume assembles the tail section panels to demonstrate the finish shape. There are 4 panels starting with the curved canopy section. The small tube mentioned in frame 26 is supporting the upper tail section.

 The 4 sections are well defined by the steps in the bottom of the panels.



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« Last Edit: August 04, 2007, 09:31:36 PM by Freud » Logged

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« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2007, 02:36:04 PM »

The four people in this foto are Marlo Treit, Jim Hume,  Michael Seal, Ph.D, and Dr. Seal's associate professor.
Seal was the Department head for Vehicle Research Institute, Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington.

http://vri.etec.wwu.edu/viking_xx.htm

Treit and Hume turned to  Dr. Seal and his then associate professor, Ed West, in the development of the car. This gave them access to the University's wind tunnel.
Viking 31 is the project number for this car at that University.
These fotos are of the 1/10th scale model.
FREUD


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« Last Edit: August 04, 2007, 07:42:31 PM by Freud » Logged

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