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Author Topic: Old roller lifters  (Read 1235 times)
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Jack Gifford
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« on: January 29, 2017, 02:08:02 AM »

These nineteen-fifties ads for Chet Herbert roller lifters are puzzling to me. The picture gives the impression of a square bar passing through them. Yeah, that would provide anti-rotation, but nobody would bore holes the full length of their block for them! I never saw a Herbert lifter back then. What was the anti-rotation scheme? What's the deal with the picture? huh

[Sorry- digital scan of the picture came out badly]


* herbert_lifter0001.jpg (87.18 KB, 468x229 - viewed 73 times.)
« Last Edit: January 29, 2017, 02:10:09 AM by Jack Gifford » Logged

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jl222
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2017, 03:11:36 AM »


  It's only ben about 55+ yrs but we had those on our Duster car club chevy powered dragster. The square bar was above the lifter bores if I remember right, something must have anchored them at the ends.

                   JL222 cheers
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Stan Back
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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2017, 01:02:39 PM »

I've got a brand new Herbert cam and kit -- all in the original wood box from about 1966.  The square rod goes thru the oil galley in the SBC.  The problem is, if you need to change something, you gotta pull the rod out the front of the block.
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rouse
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« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2017, 01:28:51 PM »

Wow! $150.00 Dollars in 1955 would be like a whole lot nowadays.

 The square bars was so there would still be room for oil.

Later on they had rivet heads on the lifter body that you machined a groove down each lifter bore for anti-rotation. That actually worked pretty good, but you did have to machine the grooves in the lifter bores.


Rouse
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Johnnie Rouse
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Jack Gifford
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« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2017, 11:54:40 PM »

Hmm... I guess it's my fault for never being "into" Chevy V8s- I had no idea their oil galleries intersected the lifter bores. So... Chet Herbert must have determined that the galleries were machined true enough to the lifter bore centerlines for the guide bars to function okay? In general, that sort of precision would be unusual for oil passages in mass-produced blocks- if created by drilling from both ends (very common practice) the two bores usually didn't even align well where they met in the middle. huh

rouse- Are you sure those two schemes didn't occur in the opposite order? When Herbert first offered these lifters (and Iskenderian first offered the tie-bar style) was 1958, at about the time engine builders were getting tired of needing to broach keyways into lifter bores.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2017, 11:56:22 PM by Jack Gifford » Logged

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salt27
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« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2017, 12:08:37 AM »

I had to drill the passenger side lifter oil gallery on a SBC that was not drilled all the way through from the factory.

Had a heck of a time trying to figure out why we weren't getting oil to some of the lifters.   tongue

  Don
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jacksoni
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« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2017, 09:05:51 AM »

I had to drill the passenger side lifter oil gallery on a SBC that was not drilled all the way through from the factory.

Had a heck of a time trying to figure out why we weren't getting oil to some of the lifters.   tongue

  Don
Hmmm, you did pull all the plugs and run brushes through all galleries to clean this newly machined block prior to assembly right?  shocked sorry.... evil
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Jack Iliff
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rouse
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« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2017, 09:18:50 AM »

Quote

rouse- Are you sure those two schemes didn't occur in the opposite order? When Herbert first offered these lifters (and Iskenderian first offered the tie-bar style) was 1958, at about the time engine builders were getting tired of needing to broach keyways into lifter bores.

Your probably right about that. Shows you what a poorboy trying to go racing has to do. I ran the broached lifters in my old 392 Hemi until 1980. Never ran anything else. The T bar stuff was out there but cost more, and I thought it added to much extra stuff that could break.

Rouse
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Johnnie Rouse
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Stan Back
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« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2017, 11:05:49 AM »

"Chet Herbert must have determined that the galleries were machined true enough to the lifter bore centerlines for the guide bars to function okay?"

By the time you got the straight bar thru 8 lifters, they were aligned pretty well.  Can't remember it all -- but some blocks used small freeze plugs at the front, some had "pipe" plugs.
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salt27
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« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2017, 11:27:58 PM »

I had to drill the passenger side lifter oil gallery on a SBC that was not drilled all the way through from the factory.

Had a heck of a time trying to figure out why we weren't getting oil to some of the lifters.   tongue

  Don
Hmmm, you did pull all the plugs and run brushes through all galleries to clean this newly machined block prior to assembly right?  shocked sorry.... evil

Jack, It arrived at the dealership that way in a brand new 1976 GMC pickup.

Evidently GM doesn't run a brush through the galleys before assembly.    rolleyes

No need to be sorry, I do clean the galleys on the engines I build.    grin

  Don

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