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Author Topic: Steady, Straight, WOT  (Read 8865 times)
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Elmo Rodge
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« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2016, 08:08:53 PM »

I like it. One thought though. As you are adding to the chassis, be careful that you don't block yourself from getting in there to do your final welding. It can happen.  rolleyes Wayno
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Mr. Schimstock
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« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2016, 01:21:45 PM »

I like it. One thought though. As you are adding to the chassis, be careful that you don't block yourself from getting in there to do your final welding. It can happen.  rolleyes Wayno


LOL! ..... I found the that out already.   Had to take the helmet off, stick head through bars, put helmet back on already.  Really wasn't expecting that issue.  Haven't found anything I absolutely can't reach yet.
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Dr Goggles
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« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2016, 03:30:08 PM »

Mike and Gary did a LOT of development work on the Buford a few years back -

http://www.landracing.com/forum/index.php/topic,4974.0.html

It's a good read and a good discussion regarding the attributes and foibles of the Buick, and this thread concentrates on setting up EFI and testing.  It's been a long time since anybody went through this thread, and while the end result was less than they had hoped for, there's much to learn here.

SO GLAD to see another Lakester coming out of Wisconsin!  I was just in Berlin, WI, two weeks ago.

One quick thought - I see you're running disc brakes.  Consider changing out to drums.  You can back the shoes off, and they won't hang up or drag like discs are wont to do.  Turn the power into speed, not heat.

The chute is going to do most of the stopping, anyway.

TO SUPPORTIVE WISCONSIN RACING WIVES!   cheers

I like that idea.  The discs came on the axle and I haven't given them much thought yet.  Ultimately the drums might package in the wheels better and provide less drag.

Get the right wheels ( a six inch rim on zero will do it) and you'll be able to tuck the drums inside a flat inner wheel disc.

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Few understand what I'm trying to do but they vastly outnumber those who understand why...................

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tauruck
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« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2016, 01:09:27 PM »

The more I look at SOS, the more I think I should have built one.

I was just about to throw the drum brakes I have away.

I think I'll keep them for a rainy day. grin
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Polyhead
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« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2016, 02:57:09 PM »

The more I look at SOS, the more I think I should have built one.

I was just about to throw the drum brakes I have away.

I think I'll keep them for a rainy day. grin

drums are less drag, drums are faster.  lighter too so you have less unsprung weight.
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Ben 'Polyhead' Smith
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Mr. Schimstock
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« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2016, 01:20:51 PM »

On a vehicle without suspension or very little wheel movement, unsprung mass really doesn't matter much.  With no suspension it could be all considered unsprung.  

Disc brakes generally have better power density than a drum arrangement.   For an LSR application it depends on what you have room for and what your plan is for how to stop.
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kiwi belly tank
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« Reply #21 on: March 02, 2016, 02:11:05 PM »

If you need to stop a lakester in a hurry because it's on fire or you just need to clean the $hit out of your fire suit, you're going to need more than a couple of drum brakes on the back that will either be locking up or fading. Run your old drum brake vehicle down the freeway & nail the park brake & see how that works out for ya.
  Sid.
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RichFox
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« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2016, 02:52:40 PM »

i took the spot brakes off my roadster and replaced them with '56 Olds drums. No drag. It will easily lock the rear wheels on pavement, let alone salt. more brake won't lock them any tighter. front brakes would help a lot.
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Mr. Schimstock
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« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2016, 07:09:28 PM »

From what I've seen/read about, front brakes on the salt need to balanced really well with the back if they are going to be applied at higher speeds.  

I don't think it would be good if the front tires to skid or push the center of resistance (center of pressure plus the braking force) too far forward. That would result in a spin out. 

This will take some additional pondering.
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Mr. Schimstock
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« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2016, 07:19:36 PM »

If you need to stop a lakester in a hurry because it's on fire or you just need to clean the $hit out of your fire suit, you're going to need more than a couple of drum brakes on the back that will either be locking up or fading. Run your old drum brake vehicle down the freeway & nail the park brake & see how that works out for ya.
  Sid.

You make some good points.   
The biggest point against discs brakes is the difficulty in getting them to not drag.  Streamlining around them can be dealt with.

I wonder if anyone has ever put a set of springs between the pads to push them off the disc.  This would be similar to what the springs are doing in a drum brake.  Clearance over the disc would be an issue and it would take some fine tuning to get the clearance dialed in and take a little more volume from the master cylinder...... but it would provide the some of the best of both worlds.
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salt27
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« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2016, 07:36:23 PM »

I wonder if anyone has ever put a set of springs between the pads to push them off the disc.  This would be similar to what the springs are doing in a drum brake.  Clearance over the disc would be an issue and it would take some fine tuning to get the clearance dialed in and take a little more volume from the master cylinder...... but it would provide the some of the best of both worlds.

That's what we do on our bike and it works well.
With new pads we don't have pump up issues.
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Milwaukee Midget
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« Reply #26 on: March 02, 2016, 07:39:47 PM »

A trick some of the bike guys do is just before the take off, they pry open the discs a touch with a pry bar.  Gets it done, but if you enclose your brakes inside a disc, another approach might be necessary.

Mark once mentioned machining the disc a few thousandths off center to push the pads out as you roll - a trick some sports racers embrace - but few capable of over 200 mph.

It all depends upon where you run and how fast you go.

I asked Joe Timney last year about running my Midget at Wilmington.  I'm only running rear drums, and ran a best of 126 in 3 at Bonneville - it might hit 110 in the mile on pavement - he didn't think it would be a problem.

You'd likely be using much bigger brakes than I do, and they ran drums in NASCAR up until - what - the late 1960s when they were getting close to 190 mph in cars that weighed 3500 lbs.


In the end, you need to feel safe driving it.
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"Problems are almost always a sign of progress."  Harold Bettes
Well, I guess we're making a LOT of progress . . .  rolleyes

We are NOT rebuilding . . . We are reloading.

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kiwi belly tank
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« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2016, 10:06:31 PM »

A simple spring mechanism between the pads will retract them from the rotor & the style of that will depend on the style of your caliper.
I've done it on a lot of race cars over the years & learned to left foot & heel n toe. My new 4WD liner has 4 wheel steel brake rotors (built by Podunk) with 3500 Chevy calipers on all 4 corners with horseshoe springs between the pads & they retract for zero touch. I also have spiral gear diff carriers so it can't lock a wheel without breaking something.
The brakes only brake the wheels, the tires brake the vehicle.
  Sid. 
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Mr. Schimstock
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« Reply #28 on: March 04, 2016, 01:48:44 PM »

Sid,   

By "spiral gear diff carriers" are you referring to the Torsion style diff?   These are a proportional style diff.  I'm not sure what you would break by locking a wheel.     
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Tman
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« Reply #29 on: March 28, 2016, 04:40:10 PM »

Geeze Marty, I did not know you were working on this!?
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