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Author Topic: Sheet Metal Intake Manifold.  (Read 76299 times)
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Queeziryder
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« Reply #90 on: December 26, 2015, 09:19:10 AM »

Mikey,
Make a replaceable blow off plate, using something like a plastic milk carton for the replaceable media.
I used something like this on my ally plenum on my Nitrous turbo funny bike. If I had a nitrous burp, then the plastic milk carton would blow, leaving the plenum intact, it was good for just under 3 Bar and 3 stages of Nitrous (about 400 HP).

It you make a jig for the blow off plate, then you can easily make replacements at a race meeting. I can see if I still have some pic's if you want.

Seasons greetings
Neil
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TheBaron
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« Reply #91 on: December 26, 2015, 10:21:27 AM »

fill the part with water and pressurize the water..... if anything lets go you only get a "Burp" and not a BOOM!....

Good luck and a blow-off panel is a necessity like Neil suggested,

Robert
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« Reply #92 on: December 26, 2015, 10:46:31 AM »

Thanks guys. Great advice.
That's what makes this forum so special. cheers cheers cheers cheers
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SPARKY
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« Reply #93 on: December 26, 2015, 12:17:05 PM »

hydrostatic testing   

I would for sure would only pressure  a small remote canister with only water running to the unit to be tested  also beware of threads pulling out
« Last Edit: December 26, 2015, 04:27:55 PM by SPARKY » Logged

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« Reply #94 on: December 26, 2015, 12:18:28 PM »

Hydro testing is the way to go Mike. You fill the object completely with water before you apply the air pressure. That leaves you with only a very small air bubble. You still have to contain the object in some way but the resulting explosion is much less. I've personally seen vessels let go at 16,000 psi and the result is massive destruction but not anywhere near what it would be without the water. Where I worked they were building aluminum cylindrical tanks wrapped in an inch or more of carbon fiber.

Good luck with it.

I hope Christmas went well and all the best in the New Year.

Pete
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« Reply #95 on: December 26, 2015, 01:49:51 PM »

Water filled is the ONLY way to go.

Immerse the whole contraption in a 55 (or larger) open head drum filled with water or loose sand.    Position the drum outside, away from buildings, and if you are paranoid, sandbag the outside of the drum.   You want to use some sort of easily dispersed media to absorb any high pressure explosion.

It should go without saying, you need to be: out of range . . . . . . .

JMO

Hope you have a pleasant (and safe!!) Holiday season and a Happy (and prosperous) New Year.

 cheers cheers cheers
Fordboy
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« Reply #96 on: December 26, 2015, 05:53:41 PM »

Mike,
When I worked in a shop that fabed boiler tubes we filled them almost full of water, fit a pressure gauge and put in about 50 psi. In 24 hours if we had 50 psi, no leaks.
Doesn't get max pressure but it is  a start.
Terry
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tauruck
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« Reply #97 on: December 26, 2015, 10:44:28 PM »

OK guys, I'll do the test with water.

I'll make sure safety is the number one priority.

I guess the easier option would have been to fabricate an Aluminum piece
but I can't weld the material. I don't have the skill or the equipment.

Again, thank you all for the advice. You guys never let me down.
The project is not a quickie so it will be a while before we get a result. cheers
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Stainless1
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« Reply #98 on: December 26, 2015, 11:53:34 PM »

Uhh guys.... now you're scaring me... sandbags.... lets not get carried away....  

short story... we were building 2 3 gallon gas tanks for the Bockscar...  Our youngest member at the time was Marty's little brother Kevin, about 20 at the time, he is a very good welder... so after he welded  up the first one, he decided he needed to pressure test it to be sure of the welds... put the cap on, put plugs in the holes and hooked it straight to shop air.... 150 psi.... Bang... scared the crap out of him and us, we were working on the other side of the shop.  After things settled down, we mentioned that he might want to put a regulator on the air line... since psi was pounds of pressure per square inch and there were a lot of square inches...  shocked
No one was killed, the tank split next to the weld on corner... but Kev got a valuable physics demonstration... So if you are pressurizing any part, consider it's operating parameters, and what you are checking before you go over the edge.

Just my thoughts....  rolleyes
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Stainless
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« Reply #99 on: December 27, 2015, 06:35:49 AM »

When I check a tank of that sort I plug all the ports except one, usually the filler. I then wrap a rag around the air nozzle of the shop air and put that in the open port. I then just give quick blasts of air and spray the tank with water containing a bit of dish detergent. The bubbles show the exact location of any leak and it takes very little pressure to make the bubbles form.

Pete
« Last Edit: December 27, 2015, 06:38:02 AM by Peter Jack » Logged
Rex Schimmer
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« Reply #100 on: December 27, 2015, 04:48:40 PM »

Mike,
Filling with water is the very best way as water is pretty incompressible  so it cannot store lots of energy so when the part fails it is not a real big bang. Submerging in water is also standard practice for this type of testing as it contain what ever bang does occur. Another option for providing the pressure is to use a high pressure water pressure washer. The one I have will go to 2500 psi and it has a pressure control valve so you can slowly increase the pressure. The up side of using a pressure washer is that there is no air involved so you only have water under compression. There is some "capacitance" from the expansion of the hose but it is pretty small. I have been contemplating doing some hydro forming of small sheet metal parts and plan to use my pressure washer as the pressure source. 

When you do it take a video, it may be fun to watch! Good luck.

One other thing is not to do it at all as the part you are building sounds pretty stout. I have seen many fabricated aluminum manifolds that take several bar of inlet pressure that do not fail and they are not even close to being as strong as what you are describing.

Rex
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« Reply #101 on: December 27, 2015, 05:02:17 PM »

Another consideration is that pressure vessels do a lot better if they are spherical or cylindrical with curved ends.  Flat sides and corners are asking for stress concentrations and possible trouble.  Reinforcement at openings is also a good idea.
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« Reply #102 on: December 28, 2015, 12:38:23 PM »

Mike, some visuals for IO's point from the FlatCaddy build: http://www.landracing.com/forum/index.php/topic,8271.345.html
Check the next page as well. Remember the pressure affects everything connected to the manifold, not just the manifold!
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« Reply #103 on: December 29, 2015, 02:26:00 AM »

Thanks Woody, point taken. cheers

I've got part of the top half post curing right now at 60*C.

Tomorrow I'll add the heavy layers and vacuum the piece.

I'll have pics with a report. cheers cheers
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« Reply #104 on: January 17, 2016, 07:39:43 AM »

Wilson Manifolds is selling 105mm Throttle bodies some with the IAD block off.

Which one would suit my application?.

I like the unit that bolts on out back and has the V band up front but the IAD is new to me.
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