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Author Topic: 9216 APS-1350 rebuild  (Read 9330 times)
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Nortonist 592
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« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2014, 10:49:21 PM »

What laughs at our paint efforts?   And is better than safety wire or loctite for keeping nuts on forever?
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Get off the stove Grandad.  You're too old to be riding the range.
Jessechop
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« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2014, 07:03:36 AM »

The frame was originally silver 2 part urethane.  The first trip to the salt flats revealed the need for some frame mods and a different fairing. The silver paint  was media blasted off. New fairing mounts fabricated. Then the frame was painted with DuPont metal etch epoxy primer. Finally painted with DuPont red 2 part urethane.   

Its good paint, that's for sure. The bike looks powdercoated, just that one spot on the swing arm. Found a broken fairing mount too. I went to the parts store this morning and asked for some Joe Daly red, he said they didn't list it. I asked for Fairway Motorsports red, couldn't find that either..... grin
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55chevr
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« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2014, 03:50:46 PM »

The swing arm spot was repaired from Bonneville when the sprocket ate the chain guard.   Try "Fire Engine Red".   


Joe
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Jessechop
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« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2014, 08:42:05 PM »

Picked up a blast cabinet today. Should of done that years ago.
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edinlr
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« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2014, 10:15:37 PM »

That is a nice looking bike stand you have in post #12 and I also like the lift under the chassis.  Do you mind telling me what brands you used?  Any issues with either one?  Thanks, good luck on the build.
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Honda CX650 turbo
Jessechop
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« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2014, 07:04:49 AM »

All of that is Pro Lift from Clark Heintz tool in NH. The lift table is air and I love it. It was a package deal with roller bars, extension, etc


http://www.nhproequip.com/pro-1200max-motorcycle-lift-package-free-shipping

Let me know if you want more info. It blows my Harbor Freight lift table out of the water
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Jessechop
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« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2014, 02:46:33 PM »



Experimenting with the rear brake/ clutch lever set up today. Very close on clearance to the body. Will need to do some modifying there.

That's a Wilwood master off a newer Arctic Cat snowmobile. Just need to get a ball on the end of the lever
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Jessechop
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« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2014, 06:35:41 AM »

The braking system explained.

When Joe ran the bike the first year he used a foot mounted rear master and hand mounted front. Years after he ran a hand operated rear only. With the primary track being Loring I was not comfortable running a single master, even though the speeds will likely be below the 175 mph front brake requirement. We have plenty of shut down, just planning for the what ifs.

The foot mounted master was not ideal for me as my legs are relatively long and the fluid motion of activating the pedal isn't there. Thus the hand mounted rear and front. Loosely I am planning on running BMST this year. If in fact that happens the pictured master will be removed and the front master will become the rear once again.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2014, 07:43:56 AM by Jessechop » Logged
55chevr
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« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2014, 08:21:44 AM »

The bike was originally built to ECTA rules.  Initially the bike had conventional dual braking systems.  The rules mentioned front brake optional for classes below 175 mph.  The 1000cc pushrod records were in the 150 mph range and second year racing I removed the front brake system.  The conventional foot operated rear brake conformed to the rules and functioned flawlessly racing.  The unforeseen issue was unloading the bike from the trailer.  Without a brake on the handlebars to control the descent on the ramp it was a nightmare to unload.   After a few adventures and pestering, other racers and neighbors to assist I came up with a simple solution. I used the front master cylinder to control the rear caliper using a long stainless AN3 line.  Problem solved.
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rd400f
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« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2014, 06:03:33 PM »

Hi
I trick I was shown when at Speedweek 2008.
Put the bike in gear and use the clutch lever to control the bike as it is rolling off the trailer.
No front brake needed.
Richard
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Stan Back
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« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2014, 07:54:15 PM »

Genius!!!

(Make sure the ignition's off.)
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Member of the San Berdoo Roadsters California's most-exclusive roadster club.
Celebrating 65th anniversary of racing on the salt.
55chevr
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« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2014, 08:00:10 PM »

Wet clutch drags .... tried that ....
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edinlr
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« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2014, 09:10:19 PM »

Thanks for the info on the lift table, I agree that it is much nicer than the HF.  The quality and extra features seem to make it worth the premium price.  So what brand blast cabinet did you get?
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Jessechop
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« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2014, 06:06:48 AM »

Thanks for the info on the lift table, I agree that it is much nicer than the HF.  The quality and extra features seem to make it worth the premium price.  So what brand blast cabinet did you get?

The lift was well worth the money, much less money than a Handy lift which was nice.

The blast cabinet is a cheap-o HF unit. It needed a little tweaking out of the box, but not bad. Extra seal on the door, whip hose with bulkhead connector for the air and a different vacuum hose set up. All in all I am happy.

I also purchased the HF parts washer. So far so good on that unit also
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Peter Jack
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« Reply #29 on: October 28, 2014, 07:41:22 AM »

If you want things a little quieter in the shop when you're using the blast cabinet you might want to replace the vacuum with a dust collector. A baffle in front of the dust collection opening in the cabinet will go along way sorting the beads from the dust.

Pete
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