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Author Topic: Australian Streamliner Bike Build  (Read 195440 times)
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Jon
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« on: March 12, 2012, 11:38:19 PM »

Hi

Been lurking & asking random questions for a while.

I'm putting together a Streamliner bike slowly, this is a low(ish) $ build compared to a lot of the builds I see on here.
Plan is to do all work myself if possible, I've got hobby size lathe & mill, old Mig that I bought 20+ years ago and a folder I made just after I left school.

With Lake Gairdner washed out I'm spending a couple weeks working on it, have a few more random questions & thought I may as well put them all in one spot.

My design is based on NACA66 low drag airfoils, 600mm wide at the widest point, 800mm body height +100mm of ground clearance, 4m long.
 
Height is so I can see over a 23" LSR tyre width is to fit the current CBR1000f motor and possibly a Bussa motor later.

I started off by cutting out a series of ellipses to represent the body shapevery 250mm along the length.

Latest in ellipse drawing equipment (did I mention I'm low tech)

Front profiles;


Rear profiles;
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Jon
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2012, 11:54:54 PM »

I set these up along my build table and started mocking bits up inside;



The ellipsipses that were cut out I cut in half and used to make the core of a body plug to throw a mold off.
After pricing expanding foam etc my father mentioned he had seen lifesavers making buoys from beanbag balls when he was young so I used them and PVA glut to bulk out the mold;



I plastered over that and sanded it into shape;


Then put a layer of glass over that;

Front;


Right front 1/4"


Tail;



Pretty happy for my 2nd ever fiberglass job, 1st was at school, teacher reconed it caught on fire cos I used too much hardener, I still recon it was a lightning strike.

jon

« Last Edit: March 13, 2012, 01:06:12 AM by Jon » Logged

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Dr Goggles
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2012, 12:41:00 AM »

He's one of ours, and,

he fits right in. cheers



Clever, creative and with a sense of humour,next thing we know he'll be going fast.


Good to see you've started a diary Jon, looking forward to meeting up in person some time.
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2012, 01:00:39 AM »

Intuitively that shape sure looks right!  grin grin grin

Nice work.

Pete
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grumm441
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2012, 03:36:20 AM »

Nice one Jon
G
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Jon
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2012, 05:09:19 AM »

Thanks for the kind words guys, I get a bit random every now and then so if you see something I'm doing is a bit off please stick the boot in.

I bought 1 1/4" DOM tube for making the frame.
Didn't go ChromeMoly, figure if I get the design & welds reasonable the DOM will stand up ok.

The main hoops are ellipses to follow the body shell.
After ringing a few specialist tube benders I worked out the answer to " Can you bend some ellipses for my rollcage/frame?" is Click.... Beep.......beep. Sooks.

A guy who builds boats in a little industrial area has a tubing roller & a dirty shed.
He now has a clean shed & I got to use his roller for a few hours;



I rolled the whole tube length to the biggest radius then worked my way into the middle in stages tightening up the radius in stages.
The first one (in pic) took about 3/4 of an hour with lots of in an out of roller and testing in the profile.
I wrote down the measurements for each segment & the others the same took about 10 minutes each.

The halves will joint at the widest point and their joins wil intersect the belly rail joins.

Pic of the rear ellipse halves trimmed and laid in the shell profile at that point;


The rear engine mount, swingarm, rear suspension, chute pull mount stays & chute tubes all tie into this hoop.
The main ones follow the top and bottom better, old mates roller couldn't come in tight enough to get the tighter radius.

Made a jig up for my lathe and chucked a 1 1/4" endmill to notch my tube;

Dint be picking on my favorite G-clamp either.

Jon

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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2012, 06:42:53 AM »

I'm new to this TIG welding thing, I've run the odd bead with a MIG & stick but never used a TIG before making a couple tanks for Dave's bike.

I did a couple test welds today on the offcuts of the tube that I rolled;


I then went looking for a press to break them to see if I was happy with the strength before I started welding anything real.

While going around I called in at a guy who builds rally cars.
I'd never met him before but he took the time to have a look and he recons it looks fine but my welds too big, he gave me some advice on filler rods gas flow and stuff which should help.

I did a weld this size thinking that the fillet should be at least as big as the wall thickness of the tube.
Any advice would be great, should I stick with my gorilla welding or go thin fillets?

He didn't have a press but I found a shop that did, same test piece after a bit of abuse;


The bends in the ends away from weld were already there from the rolling job.
Thanks in advance.
jon



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Elmo Rodge
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2012, 08:32:22 AM »

Very cool Jon.  cool I'll be watching this one.  cheers Wayno
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Peter Jack
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2012, 08:35:23 AM »

Your welds are just fine. I sometimes think a lot of guys doing tig welds are too busy trying to be artists instead of working on structural soundness. I like your theory relating to wall thickness. Play with the gas flow until the weld doesn't look burned and the puddle looks clean. All should be good.

Pete
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Stainless1
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« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2012, 09:24:57 AM »

Jon, my metric math skill are limited but the widest point in you body is about 23.4 inches.... while a hayabusa will fit in that width, the wide parts of the engine sit a bit low, at the bottom of your ellipse.  It might stick out a bit.   Is it long enough, 13 feet seems a little short to fit all the stuff in, you may need another meter or 2.  Not criticism, just asking... I've worked on a few vehicles with everything tight fitting, Max's bike it like a jigsaw puzzle, pieces go in in an order  undecided
Love the shape, nice looking work... keep up the good work
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Stainless
Red Hat 228.039, 2001, 65ci, MSA Bockscar Lakester with a little N20 
MSA Bockscar Lakester #1000 my fastest mile 245 and change, 84 ci turbobusa motor... but Corey's 233 MPH H/BFL record is still 3MPH faster than mine.
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« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2012, 04:56:08 PM »

Thanks for looking guys, if it turns out 1/2 as good as your projects I will be happy.

Wayno; I'm keeping an eye on yours too.  cheers

Peter Jack; my kids tell me I'm an artist of the BS kind, I'll mess about with the gas flow some & see how it goes.
Think I'll stick with the bigger fillets, unless someone can tell me a downside.

Stainless; going on the measurements I have a Hayabussa motor should fit (just) if I put the lengthwise frame rails in the right spot.
It is pretty short & its going to be a tight fit, bit of a cross between Tetris, a Soma cube and a Rubiks cube to make it fit.
Didn't see your comment as criticism at all, if I didn't want feedback from people who have done itI wouldn't be posting on this forum.

jon





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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2012, 10:18:21 PM »

The new Triumph 675cc triple has a shape that might work well in those dimensions.  They are good engines.
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grumm441
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« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2012, 03:04:18 AM »

Jon
The other big thing you have to fit in is the fire bottles
and they're not like the fuel and water tanks
they only come in one shape
G
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« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2012, 03:43:46 AM »

Thanks for the segue Grumm cheers
Made up the fire bottle mounts this am out of 20x3mm FMS.
They go up the back of the firewall;


The fire bottles were one of the first things I bought as I figured they are one of the bigger things to find a home for, bought them uncharged and supplier will charge when I'm ready to go.

I got a pair of the bigger 10lb Coldfire bottles, had to have 11lb+ and couldn't see the sense of buying 1 10lb & 1 5lb to save a couple $.

I'm plumbing the system in one loop  with 4 nozzles in the engine bay & 2 in the drivers compartmment.

I know most people have split systems for drivers and engine compartments.
My theory is everything that can catch on fire is behind me, the only way I'm going to know I'm on fire is my but is going to be getting hot or the cabin is full of smoke.
About this time I want foam everywhere.

Thinking of running an interlock so if I hit the fire system it pulls the chute, if im on fire I want to be stopped as well as covered in foam.

Did a bit more today, will update after I cook a feed.


jon
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« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2012, 06:42:42 AM »

Started the day off making the fire bottle brackets;


Cut the tails off the half ellipses & tweaked them a bit to get the alignment spot on and beveled them to get a decent weld;


These and a couple others are the only full welds I'll be doing until I get it all tacked up as they will be covered by the side rails intersecting.

I'm drilling a 6mm (1/4") hole inside each join so that the all the tubes are linked.
I'm not planning on running compressed air, I'm going to purge and charge the frame with nitrigen when I'm finished & fit a pressure gauge, if I loose pressure the frame is cracked somewhere.
If I need to run air later I will use the frame, guess people charge their frames through a drier so that no moisture gets pumped in?

When I bought my mill 2nd hand it came with a bit of tooling, among it was a digital angle meter thingy.
Bit gimmicky I thought, I found a use for it today, getting both ends notched at the same angle;


Must be getting old, heaps easier to get spot in than a spirit level.


By the end of the day I had the main cage hoop & the rear suspension mount hoop with the mid rails & bottom rails tacked up;


The bottom rails are wide enough to let the front wheel turn between them, I will be putting a very bottom rail under the drivers comapartment for extra protection.

Dave did some surgery on his bike with a 9" cutoff wheel, guess he will update his thread.
One minute he's helping me square things up, never he has a 2 piece bike. shocked

jon
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