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Author Topic: Special Construction Build  (Read 8139 times)
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55chevr
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« Reply #30 on: December 23, 2011, 06:28:41 PM »

The dining room table photo wasnt my dining room ... A friend got it for me from a local guy in Fort Worth Texas ... He sent me the photo after he picked it up ... What is interesting this that there is nice work on all the frames. Good welding and nice design work ... I dont have the the 3rd one yet, it is on the way. It looks like there are a lot of drag frames laying around from old projects. I got a Kawasaki ZX9 front end from a local guy here off Craigslist. The parts are coming together. I am going to build a frame jig to check angles and square.  Plumb lines and level work but are a bit crude

Joe
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55chevr
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« Reply #31 on: January 11, 2012, 05:03:16 PM »

I sat the ZX10 engine in the D-K drag frame and it looks like someone trying to put a jet engine in a biplane.   They are generations apart. The original air cooled Z1 engine is wider and longer than the water cooled ZX10 engine. The deep oil pan, throttle bodies and air box make the ZX10 taller and virtually impossible to fit in the frame. I might have to front half the frame.  I am trying to avoid building a frame jig but it seems impossible without it.  The stock frame that was back halved fits better.   Now I have too many options and none are going to be easy.   
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mtkawboy
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« Reply #32 on: January 11, 2012, 05:16:12 PM »

Im sure you already know this but Ill feel better if I say it anyway. The original Z1 steering necks were never very accurate in the tracking dept front wheel to rear wheel. Hopefully it got cured with the back half but its something you might want to check. Now I feel better anyway, good luck with it
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55chevr
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« Reply #33 on: January 11, 2012, 05:45:51 PM »

The original Z1 frames were terrible. The engines were what they engineered in the 70-s. One of the frames I had there was a 12 inch mig wire tail under the gas tank. No QC at all.   Looks like I am going to build a frame jig and buy a tubing bender unless I can find someone that can do what I want. I can get a complete frame built to my spec for $3k but this simple project is becoming more like a nightmare.   
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Koncretekid
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« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2012, 08:47:32 AM »

Now you're talking!  Make a jig - - lot's of good ones on this forum and also take a look at michael moore's Euro Spares sight.  You can borrow mine if you want to pay the freight.  Build a tube bender - - Pro-tools in Florida have dies for all tubing sizes as well as complete benders, and the internet has tube bender designs for a pittance.  You'll also need a tube notcher of some kind.  Spread the top tubes out like the modern perimeter frames so you can get down low and also to have lots of room to work on the top of the motor.  Make it long enough to get your seat down below the top of the rear wheel.  Start with a good drawing.  I built my complete bike in a little over 3 months.  Good luck and keep us posted (like you might not!)
Tom
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Tman
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« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2012, 04:41:33 PM »

I once read about a guy that found this cool boat prop at a yard sale, 10 years later he had a finished 30 foot boat built around it. Sounds kinda like this project Joe!
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55chevr
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« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2012, 08:18:55 PM »

I know ... I am reviewing the logic of it right now.  If there is any logic. I tried to pick up a low frame that would work on an open bike without streamlining.  Found early Z-1 Kawasaki drag frames looked promising and when I got them in the shop nothing fits.  On the older drag frames the drive sprocket doesnt line up well with horizontal cross tubes.  The ZX10 engines output shaft it higher.  The engines are radically different in every dimension.  If I start hacking on it I might as well just make a frame from scratch.  I could build a frame jig on the welding table but this is way beyond what started as a simple project.  I have to review all the options and decide.
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oz
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« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2012, 12:23:43 PM »

I have never used a jig for frames just a flat bench with Quarter and centre lines acuratley marked out and just check and double check everything triangulating of the said lines,The frames are usually acurate to within a couple of mm. I used a plumbers 1" pipe bender to build the CBR and notched the tubes with a 4.5" angle grinder.
Shoestring stuff but it works and works well!

Cheers Oz
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2012, 10:39:57 PM »

Joe, the way Oz built his frame with a big open area above the intakes is a good idea.  Right now I am working on the Triumph inlet configuration and there is a big fat frame member in the middle of everything.  It seriously limits my options such as a Helmholz resonant plenum and other things.  I want to saw it out but the handling might affected.  Just an idea if you decide to make a frame.       
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55chevr
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« Reply #39 on: January 18, 2012, 07:32:30 AM »

My son and I built a frame jig 4 years ago for his circle track car.   it gives you a fixed center line that is easy to find .  He is proposing to build a scaled down version for bikes.   I bought the steering neck fixture from Bitterend Choppers and the rest we will make.   I am going to borrow the tubing bender from work and it looks like a go.   
Joe
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Koncretekid
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« Reply #40 on: January 18, 2012, 07:42:09 AM »

Joe,
There are pipe benders and there are tubing benders -- big difference.  Pipe benders work OK with thick wall pipe, as long as the mandrels are the exact size as the pipe.  Tube benders work on a different principal, are sized to tube sizes, and do a much better job. Make sure the bender you use is suited to the tubing you will be using.
Tom
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Frank06
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« Reply #41 on: April 16, 2012, 08:01:47 PM »

Hi Joe,

I've been rereading old build threads and was wondering if you've made any progress on this project?

Regards,
Frank John
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55chevr
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« Reply #42 on: April 16, 2012, 09:09:58 PM »

Frank -
Started over ... built a frame jig and got started ... click this link

http://www.landracing.com/forum/index.php/topic,11095.0.html

Joe
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Frank06
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« Reply #43 on: April 17, 2012, 09:38:34 AM »

Joe,

Thanks, will hopefully see you in a couple of weeks...
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