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Author Topic: MPS-PG-650 build  (Read 19320 times)
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JimL
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« Reply #75 on: July 14, 2013, 09:34:35 PM »

Heres what the bike looks like for M-PF-650 (or M-PG-650).  Starting issue is fixed by virtue of a CX500 starter.  CBR600 shifter fit right onto the CX trans.  Still have to put on numbers and letters, mod the belly pan for the shifter linkage clearance, and get cranking on fitting two bikes onto my crane trailer.

Regards, JimL


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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #76 on: July 15, 2013, 09:02:05 AM »

The engine has about 500 miles on it and it is broken in.  The jobs in early August are to change the cams, carbs, and mufflers, do the jetting on the dyno, pull all of the street stuff off and put the racing parts on, put on the giant Cascades Moto stickers, bring the bike up to Cascade Moto for an exhibit on the 17th of August, load up, and get to B'ville.  Everything is on schedule and there are lots of things to do.

The injuries and death back east make me sad.  They also tell me I need to double check things, build and develop incrementally over a long period, and be darn careful about everything.  Bill's mishap is of special concern.  He is someone I admire and my streamlining is working slowly toward his shape.  The job next year is to enclose the bottom and the back.  I hope this full partial streamlining is aerodynamically stable.   
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JimL
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« Reply #77 on: July 17, 2013, 12:26:25 AM »

Here is a pic of the bike ready for MPS class.  The second pic shows my "streamlining parts supports" for both bikes.  These hold the fairings (and for my orange bike, the tailpiece and front fender).  This allows those parts to be bolted to the fender of our trailers, while on the salt flats, when running unstreamlined classes.  I think this will be better than leaving the parts sitting loose in the pits, or trying to protect them in the back of a pickup with all the other stuff floating around.

Thats it for tonight.  Tomorrow its time to get both bikes onto the floor and start modifying my trailer for the trip out.

Regards, JimL


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JimL
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« Reply #78 on: July 26, 2013, 04:30:30 PM »

Pretty late loading up, this year.  Last year was ready in May, but it has taken a while to finish this second bike.  Now its time to start packing tools, equipment, spare parts... and do some mods to my spare 750 class engine in case one of these breaks.  

This first pic is a pretty good testament to the difference between an A bike and an M bike, running the same engines.  The second pic is a view of the other side of my trailer.  

I had to raise the deck of the trailer, to fit these two "fat" bikes.  That rear view is deceiving.  The M bike is actually 1" wider than my A bike.

  NOTE:  I wont be towing them out to Bonneville with my old '62 Ford.  That is a project for this winter, and I dont want to every take it on the salt!

JimL


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« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 04:52:09 PM by JimL » Logged
JimL
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« Reply #79 on: July 26, 2013, 04:42:01 PM »

Here are a couple of pics showing my bike mounting method.  This eliminates the slapping tie downs, slipping latches, and cut webbing.  You cant get the bikes off the trailer with a box cutter in the night, either. evil

One addition, this year, is a rear "side steady" to take a little of the work off the two mount tabs.  Probably not needed, but it keeps the rear of the bike from pumping up and down on bad roads or railroad crossings.  I've hauled the A bike a lot of miles, over the last four years, relying on those two tabs; never had a problem of any kind.  

The red bike has angle-iron guides, and center ramps for the base.  This mount will be transferred to Dans low trailer.  It will roll on and off that trailer with a shallow angle ramp.  The tire guides help get it positioned for the tab bolts.  A BIG positive for this arrangement, is that you only have to get one bolt in for the bike to be stable.  Because the tires are between the rails, a  single bolt keeps the bike vertical so that one person can go to the other side and rock the bike gently to slip the other bolt into place.  

NOTE:  I use 1/2" shouldered bolts, with a long shoulder ground to a taper, for those hold down tabs.  This allows the smaller thread area to slip through a partially aligned hole.  A 1/2" bushing is slipped over the taper area, after the bolt is fully seated.  a flat washer followed by a Nylock nut completes the bolt down.  The key point is using this tapered bolt method to prevent using too much force or physical strain when loading and securing the bike.

I still prefer the hoist method for my long, low A bike.  It just seems so easy, compared to pushing up a ramp.

JimL


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« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 04:51:14 PM by JimL » Logged
Koncretekid
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« Reply #80 on: July 26, 2013, 04:47:39 PM »

Jim your bikes and set-ups are immaculate!  I wish I could get to SCTA to see you run.
Tom
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We get too soon oldt, and too late schmart!
Life's uncertain - eat dessert first!
JimL
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« Reply #81 on: July 26, 2013, 04:56:21 PM »

Thanks, Tom, they are actually "20-foot" bikes.  Anything closer and the warts start to show.  The trailer is pretty rough, but I've been using the same one for the last 43 years.  Fresh paint this year reduces the amount of ruined clothing caused by sitting on rust or splinters!

Regards, JimL
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JimL
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« Reply #82 on: July 26, 2013, 05:01:43 PM »

I just realized I should add a note, here, for those following this thread.  When it was time to remove the M bike from my roll around build table, I could not easily get it under my trailer crane arm.  With the help of my son, I took a chance on that overhead winch you saw mounted in the attic of my shop.  It was absolutely NO problem handling that M bike with the winch using a single snatch block.  If a fellow used a 3:1 pulley reduction (and your rafters are strong enough; mine are double 2x6 in the winch area), you could probably pick up stuff sooo heavy... you could really scare yourself!

JimL
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #83 on: August 11, 2013, 01:13:49 AM »

Ray showed us a picture of your bike.  It looks like you got there on time and in good shape.  Keep us posted.
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JimL
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« Reply #84 on: August 14, 2013, 07:27:24 PM »

All done, Bo, with three for the orange bike and one for this MPS bike.  The red bike is hurt due to  a water pump wire issue while trying for another record.  It put in a nice 135+ in its MPS class.  My orange whale had a pretty good result in APS-PF-650 with a gusty side wind down run at 148+ and a return run at 163.8.  Best speed ever and not on my 750 engine.  Hmmmm....

Anyway, we also bumped the A-PG and A-PF 650 records.  Heading for home.  Have a great BUB time!

JimL
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Old Scrambler
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« Reply #85 on: August 15, 2013, 08:41:02 PM »

Now your showing some real serious speed smiley smiley smiley

When you have it all figured out the 500; 650; & 750 records are all in sight...........including the 180+ from Tom Mellor's Trident

How soft was the salt?
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2011 AMA Record - 250cc M-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 82.5 mph
2013 AMA Record - 250cc MPS-PG TRIUMPH Tiger Cub - 88.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc M-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 130.7 mph
2016 AMA Record - 750cc MPS-CG HONDA CB750 sohc - 137.7 mph
Chasis Builder / Tuner: Dave Murre
Freud
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« Reply #86 on: August 15, 2013, 10:22:48 PM »

My only comment regarding Jim is:   TOTAL CLASS.

I was so happy to get to meet him..

FREUD
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wobblywalrus
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« Reply #87 on: August 16, 2013, 12:51:54 AM »

Congratulations, Jim.  It looks like you had a good meet.
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salt27
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« Reply #88 on: August 16, 2013, 11:04:59 AM »

My only comment regarding Jim is:   TOTAL CLASS.

I was so happy to get to meet him..

FREUD


Freud, you are correct and it is great to have him as a neighbor.
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Koncretekid
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« Reply #89 on: August 16, 2013, 03:55:29 PM »

Jim,
You've definitely raised the bar!  I was thinking about bumping my motor up to 600cc by using the original long stroke crank for next year.  Now I have to think about going gaining another 20 mph - - that will be quite a goal but will be fun chasing that Honda.
Tom
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We get too soon oldt, and too late schmart!
Life's uncertain - eat dessert first!
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